Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach Kali, Arnis & Eskrima at Ten Tigers Martial Arts, Las Vegas. August 4th, 2014.

Escrima Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Kali Arnis Eskrima

Guro Ariel Flores to teach Mosses Kali, Arnis & Eskrima at Ten Tigers Martial Arts, Las Vegas   … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii, Saturday, September 13th & 14th, 2014

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Kali Arnis Eskrima

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii, Saturday, September 13th & 14th, 2014 Announcing the upcoming seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii September 13 & 14, 2014. Please check out our exciting new website at www.combatfma.com designed by humaninterestvideoproductions@gmail.com   \ … [Read more...]

Seminar: Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 20th, 2014

Kali Arnis Eskrima Lameco Ilustrisimo

    Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 20th, 2014       Guro Dino and Guro Ariel have been training partners since the 1980′s. They first began teaching seminars together in the 1990′s in Wahington State, Oregon, Nevada and California. About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Masters Bruce and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Masters Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts are now officially the head of the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts “Ilustrisimo” organization which strives to preserve the purity of the art. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego.Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino also cites the importance of his training partners in Lameco SOG and Kapisanang Mandirigma in his growth. After the passing of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, certain members of the Lameco Backyard group reformed also became know as Kapisanang Mandirigma. The group regularly continued  training, sparring, experimenting and seeking the deeper roots of their chosen arts. This group includes Guros Joel Adriatico, Hospecio “Bud” Balani Jr., Mar Elepaño, Choy Flores, Arnold Noche, Gary Quan, Hans Anton Tan and Pantaleon “Mang Leo” Revilles, Jr. (RIP). With frequent visits by Guro Lowell Pueblos, Guro Bong Hebia and honorary member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses.   … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Launches New Website @ http://combatfma.com

combat fma

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses:   About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012.   To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://combatfma.com/index.html   … [Read more...]

Illustration: Various Philippine Blades

blades

    Illustration: Various Philippine Blades   … [Read more...]

Documentary: World War II: Manila Clean-Up (1945)

manila

http://youtu.be/NtR4UTFQOGM   A month after the 1st Cavalry Division arrived in the Philippines, the battle for Manila’s liberation finally met its conclusion. The wrath of war resulted to the deaths of 100,000 Filipino civilians and the destruction of stunning landmarks that once made Manila the Pearl of the Orient.   In 1995, a monument called the “Memorare-Manila 1945” was placed at Plazuela de Sta. Isabel in Intramuros to remember this dark chapter in country’s history. The inscription, which was penned by National Artist Nick Joaquin, says that “This memorial is dedicated to all those innocent victims of war, many of whom went nameless and unknown to a common grave, or never even knew a grave at all, their bodies having been consumed by fire or crushed to dust beneath the rubble of ruins.”   From: http://www.filipiknow.net/rare-historical-videos-philippines/   … [Read more...]

Documentary: The End of Manila 1945, The Forgotten Atrocity (Warning: Graphic Content)

End of Manila

http://youtu.be/RzmE8H5wiC8   Battle of Manila (1945) The month-long  Battle of Manila in 1945 was one of the bloodiest moments of WWII, killing at least 100, 000 Filipino civilians who were either bombed or bayoneted–some were even burned alive.   It all started when the American forces led by Field Marshal Douglas MacArthur arrived in Manila in January 1945. Their initial goals were to liberate Allied civilians interned at UST as well as seize the Malacañan Palace, which they were able to achieve. Threatened by the advancing American forces, the group under General Tomoyuki Yamashita withdrew to Baguio City. All hell broke loose when Rear Admiral Sanji Iwabuchi refused to surrender and chose to defend the city until death. Historical buildings and bridges were destroyed, Bayview Hotel served as a rape center, and entire row of houses were burned together with their occupants. Thousands of innocent Filipino civilians were killed using the most atrocious of methods–they were massacred with the help of machine guns, katanas, and bayonets. In his book “American Caesar,”  author William Manchester wrote that the “devastation of Manila was one of the great tragedies of World War II. Seventy percent of the utilities, 72 percent of the factories, 80 percent of the southern residential district, and 100 percent of the business district were razed… Hospitals were set afire after their patients had been strapped to their beds. The corpses of males were mutilated, females of all ages were raped before they were slain, andbabies’ eyeballs gouged out and smeared on walls like jelly.”   From: http://www.filipiknow.net/rare-historical-videos-philippines/   … [Read more...]

The Bolomen of the Revolution by Perry Gil S. Mallari , FIGHT Times Editor

An illustration by J. Alexander Mackay published in the book Bamboo Tales by Ira L. Reeves (1900) IMAGE FROM PROJECT GUTENBERG

The Bolomen of the Revolution by Perry Gil S. Mallari , FIGHT Times Editor Arma Blanca is the name of the clandestine regiment of Filipino bolomen active during the revolution against the Spaniards and the Americans. Arma Blanca is a Spanish singular term for a bladed weapon like a sword or a knife. A fairly recent mention of Arma Blanca was made in Orlino Ochosa’s book Bandoleros: The Outlawed Guerillas of the Philippine-American War of 1903 to 1907 (New Day Publications, 1995), and it reads, “Manila’s Arma Blanca that phantom army of bolomen whom General Luna had so much depended upon in his bold attack of Manila at the start of the war with the Americans.” An earlier reference to Arma Blanca can be found in The Philippines Past and Present, by Dean C. Worcester released in 1914. Worcester, who had served as Secretary of the Interior of the Philippine Islands from 1901 to 1913 and was a member of the Philippine Commission from 1900 to 1913, wrote, “The regiment of Armas Blancas had already been raised in Tondo and Binondo. It was in existence there in December, 1898, and may have been originally organized to act against Spain.” The bolo being both a farm implement and a weapon was carried with impunity by Filipinos even in the presence of Spanish and American soldiers. Its blade is often designed heavily weighted towards the tip for ease of chopping hence when used in combat, it can easily severe a limb with a single stroke. The Philippine bolo boasts of a sturdy construction and minor dents on its blade could easily be fixed by a little hammering and filing. In the absence of guns, the Philippine revolutionary forces greatly depended upon the bolo in inflicting casualty on the enemy. A part of Worcester’s book reads, “There is no reason for believing that this is a complete statement of sandatahan [Filipino armed groups] organized in Manila by the end of January, and yet this statement gives a force of at least 6,330 men. General Otis said that this force had been reported to him as being 10,000 men. It is probably true that only a small number of them had rifles; but armed with long knives and daggers they could have inflicted much damage in a sudden night attack in the narrow and badly lighted streets of Manila.” Filipino bolomen even received precise instructions on how to use the blade in conducting raids to snatch the guns of their enemies. A part of Emilio Aguinaldo’s order to the sandatahan was included in Worcester’s book, and it reads, “At the moment of the attack the sandatahan should not attempt to secure rifles from their dead enemies, but shall pursue, slashing right and left with bolos until the Americans surrender, and after there remains no enemy who can injure them, they may take the rifles in one hand and the ammunition in the other.” Continue reading story at: http://www.manilatimes.net/the-bolomen-of-the-revolution/104227/ … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, May 31st, 2014

kali kalis arnis eskrima escrima lameco ilustrisimo fma arnis sulite ricketts

Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, May 31st, 2014     Guro Dino and Guro Ariel have been training partners since the 1980′s. They first began teaching seminars together in the 1990′s in Wahington State, Oregon, Nevada and California. About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Masters Bruce and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Masters Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts are now officially the head of the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts “Ilustrisimo” organization which strives to preserve the purity of the art. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego.Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino also cites the importance of his training partners in Lameco SOG and Kapisanang Mandirigma in his growth. After the passing of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, certain members of the Lameco Backyard group reformed also became know as Kapisanang Mandirigma. The group regularly continued  training, sparring, experimenting and seeking the deeper roots of their chosen arts. This group includes Guros Joel Adriatico, Hospecio “Bud” Balani Jr., Mar Elepaño, Choy Flores, Arnold Noche, Gary Quan, Hans Anton Tan and Pantaleon “Mang Leo” Revilles, Jr. (RIP). With frequent visits by Guro Lowell Pueblos, Guro Bong Hebia and honorary member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses.   … [Read more...]

Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room.

guro ariel flores mosses

Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room. http://youtu.be/11s-EeaYD6A Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room. This GVR Tacticals class is included in the Club Membership and open to the public. The S.A.F.E. Program (Survive an Attack by Fighting Effectively) is based on Filipino Martial Arts. Utilizing everyday objects like a pen, keys, a rolled up magazine, stick and a knife, Ariel Mosses instructs on basic self-defense techniques. These techniques can be utilized and adapted for different age groups and physical ability. Every month GV Range offers a Skill Building Class called "GVR Tacticals" with guest instructors who specialize in specific self - defense arts. Be sure to like and share our video and stop on by to get some Trigger Time on at Green Valley Range! Stay Safe! Guro Ariel F. Mosses is also an advisor for Mandirigma.org and a founding member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. More information on him at: http://combatfma.com, http://backyardeskrima.com/?cat=43 and http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=858         … [Read more...]

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS by Perry Gil S. Mallari FIGHT Times Editor

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS May 25, 2014 12:30 am by Perry Gil S. Mallari FIGHT Times Editor While there is scant mention of the specific names of the martial arts that pre-colonial Filipinos practiced, I believe that various prototypes of Filipino martial arts (FMA) were already in existence long before the arrival of Spain. To me, three things serve as indicators of the existence of indigenous FMA: organized method of warfare, metallurgical technology and sophisticated blade culture. All three aforementioned were chronicled by the Spaniards when they arrived in the Philippines.    Organized method of warfareAsdang is the prehispanic Filipino term for hand-to-hand combat as mentioned by William Henry Scott in his excellent book Barangay: Sixteenth-Century Philippine Culture and Society (1994), “Asdang was hand-to-hand combat. Bulu was a duel. Hulaw was a man known to be on the lookout for an enemy,” he wrote. While it may be true that sheer number is the prime factor why the native army of Lapulapu defeated the forces of Magellan in Mactan, I am firm in my stand that the pre-colonial Filipinos were already schooled in their own methods of warfare. Scott in his book wrote that the Visayan general term for warfare was gubat. He distinguished combat engagements into two—gahat (by land) and mangayaw (by sea). Salakay is the word used for attacking.” On land attacks, he comments, “The preferred tactic on land was ambush—habon, saghid, hoom or pool—either by lying in wait or by such strategies as exposing a few agile warriors to enemy view to lure them into a trap. Sayang was to pass by hidden enemies unawares.”  Scott even referred to an individual tactic used while being pursued by the enemy as well as how the concept of death could affect a warrior’s psyche, “Pinaorihiyan was for a fleeing warrior to turn and spear his pursuer; naga kamatayan was to fight to the death; and mangin matay was a desperate man determined to die on the field of battle.” Terminologies pertaining to military affairs also abound as the following lines from Scott’s book indicate, “Special roles connected with the conduct of war included away, enemy; bantay, sentinel; bila, allies; kagon, mediator; and laway, spy.”   Continue reading article here: http://www.manilatimes.net/evidence-of-pre-colonial-filipino-martial-arts-2/99117/     … [Read more...]

The PBS Film: Crucible of Empire – The Spanish American War

Katipunero

  The PBS Film: Crucible of Empire - The Spanish American War   One hundred years ago, United States celebrated victory in the Spanish-American War. Popular songs and headlines popularized Commodore Dewey's victories at sea and Theodore Roosevelt's ride up Kettle Hill. Although the Spanish-American War sparked unprecedented levels of patriotism and confidence, the defeat of the Spanish also raised new questions about the nation's role as a world power. CRUCIBLE OF EMPIRE: THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, narrated by award-winning actor Edward James Olmos, examines the colorful characters and historic events surrounding this 100-year-old war and its relevance to the twentieth century. When a declining Spain, beset by rebellion abroad, fell to American expansionism, the United States inherited her colonies and suddenly emerged as a world power. The experience and questions that the Spanish-American War raised about foreign intervention echo throughout the 20th century—as recent events in Kosovo show. Even in its own time, the war with Spain was understood as a turning point in American history. As the twentieth century ends, it is instructive to note the complexities and significance of this very brief war that began this century. In the words of noted historian Walter LaFeber, "The 1898 war literally as well as chronologically ushered in the United States as a major shaper, soon the major shaper, of twentieth-century world politics and commerce." In the process, it also unified a nation still embittered by Civil War divisions; debuted the media in its role as catalyst of U.S. intervention; built up the navy and inspired a re-evaluation of the army; and vastly broadened the powers of the president in wartime and foreign affairs. Clearly, the Spanish-American War was more than the war that ended the nineteenth century; it was also the war that launched the American century. Using original footage and period photographs, newspaper headlines, more than a dozen popular songs from the 1890s, and interviews with some of America's most prominent historians, CRUCIBLE OF EMPIRE tells how issues of race, economy, technology, yellow journalism, and public opinion propelled America into this war. Four 1990s Senators bring to life the 1899 Senate debate on imperialism: Patrick Leahy (VT), Frank Lautenberg (NJ), Paul Simon (IL), and Alan Simpson (WY). The film also features Larry Linville (Major Frank "Ferret Face" Burns of "M*A*S*H") as the voice of Rough Rider Theodore Roosevelt, Laurence Luckinbill as President William McKinley, and Lou Diamond Phillips as Philippine revolutionary Emilio Aguinaldo. Continue reading at: http://www.pbs.org/crucible/film.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g8NpQsmxj4 http://youtu.be/8g8NpQsmxj4 … [Read more...]

Photo: Eskrimadors in the Korean War

mandirigma.org kali arnis eskrima escrima philippines

Eskrimadors in the Korean War Philippine Army soldiers in South Korea display their bladed weapons (the Bolo) which they used in silently killing Chinese and North Korean sentries or during hand to hand fighting. The Filipino soldiers earned a well-deserved reputation in the Korean War as brutally efficient in killing the enemy soldiers with their bolos.         The Philippine Expeditionary Force to Korea (PEFTOK): 1950-1955 THE KOREAN WAR, which began 63 years ago on 25 June 1950, remains a"Forgotten War" for most of today’s 100 million Filipinos. Hardly surprising in a country where three out of four persons is 35 years old or younger. But for the 7,420 officers and men of the Philippine Army that served in Korea from 1950 to 1955, and for those who actively supported our fighting men, the Korean War was probably the defining event of their lives. From 1950 to 1955, five Battalion Combat Teams (BCTs) of the Philippine Army served in Korea as the elite PHILIPPINE EXPEDITIONARY FORCE TO KOREA orPEFTOK. PEFTOK’s mission was to defend the Republic of Korea against communist conquest. Continue at: http://peftok.blogspot.com         More about the Korean War at Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs, United States Department of State http://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/korean-war-2 … [Read more...]

Lameco Eskrima is the system of Filipino martial arts founded by the late Punong Guro Edgar Sulite

edgar-sulite

Lameco Eskrima is the system of Filipino martial arts founded by the late Punong Guro Edgar Sulite Lameco Eskrima is the system of Filipino martial arts founded by the late Punong Guro Edgar Sulite based on his training and experience with various Philippine Martial Arts masters, with heavy influence from Jose Caballero and Antonio Ilustrisimo. The word Lameco is actually a combination of words which are the three basic ranges of combat involved in the study and practice of Lameco Eskrima – Largo, Medio and Corto (Long, Middle, close). Contents One of the characteristics of Filipino martial arts is the use of weapons from the very beginning of training. Lameco uses Double and single Stick, Double and single Dagger, Stick and Dagger, Sword, Staff, Handkerchief, and Empty Hands. Lameco Eskrima is a synthesis of five major and six minor systems of Eskrima. Lameco training includes  drills called Laban Laro (Play Fighting). Laban Laro allows the escrimador to come as close to real combat as possible without injury. It is also designed to get an uncountable number of repetitions in a short period of time. Through his constant efforts for developing new training innovations, Edgar invented unique armor for the hands and forearms that allowed practitioners to safely train more realistically. History At a young age Edgar Sulite’s father exposed him to the Filipino Martial Arts, himself being a boxer and Arnisador. Growing up in the Barrios of the Philippines, Edgar witnessed many skirmishes settled blade against blade. Edgar trained with martial arts masters who included Leo Gaje of Pekiti-Tirsia, Jose Cabellero of De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orehenal, Jesus Abella of Modern Largos, Antonio Illustrisimo of Kali Illustrisimo and many others. In 1981, he moved to Manila to train under Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo. After relocating to the United States on June 30, 1989. … [Read more...]

Movie Poster: The Pacific Connection – Philippines, 1974. Starring Master Roland Dantes

Master Roland Dantes

  Roland Dantes plays an avenging hero, who defeats the forces of oppression with the power of Arnis! Roland Dantes plays Ben, a farm boy who comes into conflict with the Evil Spanish Governor and his two sons. One of the sons is played by a young Dean Stockwell. To assist in their oppression the Governor hires a Samurai played by Hiroshi Tanaka to teach his son the Japanese Katana sword. To counter this, Ben studies under a blind Franciscan monk to obtain some advanced fighting secrets and develop his warrior senses. Additionally Ben must search for the legendary “Iron Reed”. A mystical stick so strong that grows in the lava of an active Volcano. One of the first full length movies featuring the Philippine Warrior Arts. A must see for any Filipino Martial Arts practitioner. Made in a similar spirit of the “Kung Fu” movies coming out of Hong Kong at the same time in the 1970′s. The fight scenes were choreographed by Professor Remy Presas himself and is jam packed with Arnis inspired fight scenes. Dean Stockwell learned Arnis for his role and continued his Arnis practice long after the filming was over. The success of this movie led to a follow up film “Arnis: Sticks of Death” in 1984 also starring Roland Dantes. Director: Luis Nepomuceno Country: Philippines Language: English Release Date: 1974 (Philippines) Stars: Roland Dantes, Dean Stockwell, Hiroshi Tanaka, Nancy Kwan, Guy Madison, Alejandro Rey, Gilbert Roland, Elizabeth Oropesa, Fred Galang, Gloria Sevilla, Vic Diaz, Cole Mallard … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Launches New Website @ http://combatfma.com

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses mandirigma.org

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses:   About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012.   To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://combatfma.com/index.html   … [Read more...]

David Gould discusses comparing Spanish fencing Influence on the local Warrior Arts in both Mexico and the Philippines

David Gould discusses comparing Spanish fencing Influence on the local Warrior Arts in both Mexico and the Philippines When comparing the results of Spanish Influence in both Mexico and the Philippines, there is a distinct difference between Filipino Sword Play (Eskrima; indigenous Filipino / Spanish Fencing influence) and Mexican Swordplay (Esgrime; Pure Spanish fencing not mixed with indigenous fighting arts). The Filipino version is quite different as it adopted a lot of the native Filipino practices at the time (1521 - 1898) and the Mexican style remained very much Spanish with Espada-y-daga and Cape and sword technique being brought to the forefront by the Doms and Nobles who were placed in charge of Mexico during its centuries of evolution. Compare the style of "Zorro" from Alta California fame (Mexico) with "Tatang" Ilustrisimo of kalis Ilustrisimo fame and you will get a better idea of what I am referring as there is a distinct difference even though the common thread for both seems to be Spanish Fencing. You can look at the two which were both influenced equally centuries back by the very same Spanish Sword play but each has a different result and appearance to them today. This is significant to the influences which were in each area before the Spanish arrived, native Filipinos in the Philippines and Aztec and Maya in Mexico. Spanish Swordplay was mixed with Filipino Martial Arts in its evolution in the Philippines which resulted in a hybrid of sorts but it remained pure in Mexico not being mixed with the fighting systems of the Mejica (Aztec) which seemed to have not survied in Mexico after Hernan Cortes and his conquistadors defeated that culture in the 1520`s in what is now Mexico City. Through the 1800`s in Mexico this was very obvious regarding the many duels fought in Mexico City with Sword play which had the appearance of remaining pure Spanish fencing. So with all things being equal you should not see any differences in the Spanish Fencing which influenced both Mexico (1519) and the Philippines (1521) but you do and this is because of pre-hispanic fighting methodology which existed in both geographical locations before Spanish Fencing reached the shores of either of the two cultures. Other wise you would not be able to see a distinct difference between Spanish Fencing as it was influenced equally in Manila and Mexico City as both would have the same appearance today as it would have been allowed to remain pure in both cultures equally. But it did not, so there had to have been an Indigenous Filipino component which influenced the evolution in the Philippines, hence the difference in concept, application and appearance yet still showing some Spanish influence and the usage of Spanish names with-in its curriculum regarding numerous fighting styles in the Philippines.   When the Spanish invaded the Phiippines in 1521 they did so from Cebu, North to Manila and there was a lot of territory where native Filipinos lived who never saw a Spaniard or their influence. But the question remains for how long? Until the 1600`s? 1700`s? 1800`s? At some point in time the influence would have had to travel south into Mindanao and other areas where Spanish influence had not been felt or experienced before if only minimal by travelers or fishermen who ventured from Mindanao and those areas to other parts of the Philippines and then those influences could have been taken back with them to Mindanao. You are right, there are a lot of things found in the Filipino Warrior Arts regarding weapons, strikes, angles, footwork, etc... which are not found in Spanish Fencing from the 16th Century. So like I stated in my post above you have to come to the conclusion that there were indigenous Warrior Arts in the Philippines before the Spanish invaded at Mactan, but how long were those styles allowed to continue on and flourish unaltered before they were influenced with Spanish methodology, if at all? No one can say with certainty. I am sure that some styles in Mindanao and other areas may have gone generations without mixing the new technology and methodology with the old, but again for how long? It is evident that Spanish Fencing did not mix with the indigenous warior Arts of the Aztec or Maya in Mexico, as well as with the Inka in South America (Peru) because Spanish Fencing remained very pure and unaltered in those areas through out the 19th century and beyond. But this can not be said of the Philippines where the end result is so much different from Spanish Fencing. There clearly was another dominating influence which is responsible for the evolution in the Philippines. In saying all of the above let me make one thing clear. Regardless of the various influences and evolution regarding the Pilipino Warrior Arts in the Philippines and now around the world I am amazed and in awe by this knowledge and fighting ability. I have been fortunate to have trained in numerous Martial Arts from all around the world … [Read more...]

Comparative table of Baybayin variations by Pedro Paterno, 19th century.

paterno

Comparative table of Baybayin variations In the 19th century Pedro Paterno published this comparative table of the various baybayin variations. Baybayin the correct term for our pre-Spanish syllabary not "Alibata". … [Read more...]

Mandirigma.org – Online Since 1998 – A Project of Kapisanang Mandirigma

  Mandirigma.org – Online Since 1998 - A Project of Kapisanang Mandirigma Mandirigma.org Mandirigma Research Organization also known as mandirigma.org is a project of Kapisanang Mandirigma. Their focus includes preserving and promoting the Warrior Arts commonly known as Kali, Eskrima and Arnis. The Warrior Arts is one of the most important aspects of any society because its very nature is to defend and preserve the culture. Thus, mandirigma.org is also involved in researching issues from ancient to current. The primary objective of mandirigma.org is to do its part in keeping alive ancient knowledge and give honor to the sacrifices made by previous generations.Using both traditional and modern methods in its work, mandirigma.org has organized, collaborated with and participated in classes, conferences, demonstrations, festivals, lectures, seminars and workshops with prominent college and community organizations. Aside from their hands-on approach, mandirigma.org utilizes multimedia technologies such as audio, desktop, video and web to reach people across the globe. Researching since the 1970′s and online since 1998, mandirigma.org believes in being actively involved in giving back to the community. They have collaborated with and volunteered in various non-profit agencies. They have also arranged fundraisers in order to assist causes for indigenous tribal groups and organizations dedicated to cultural preservation in the Philippines. mandirigma.org believes that this expansive pursuit is at its best a collaborative effort. This has allowed mandirigma.org to meet and work with many fine individuals and organizations throughout the Philippines, the United States and the world. mandirigma.org welcomes all with an open and positive mind to participate and join them on this never-ending cultural adventure. This humble site is dedicated to honoring the sacrifices of Warriors throughout the many generations that have come before us. Maraming Salamat!   … [Read more...]

Mandirigma.org founders Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, Guro Arnold Noche, Guro Bud Balani and Guro Dino Flores mentioned in the Virtual Filipino Martial Arts Museum’s “Top 200 Living Guro’s” List

Mandirigma.org founders Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, Guro Arnold Noche, Guro Bud Balani and Guro Dino Flores mentioned in the Virtual Filipino Martial Arts Museum's "Top 200 Living Guro's" List Exerpt from: http://www.filipinomartialartsmuseum.com/index.htm Welcome to the Filipino Martial Arts Museum, the virtual museum and repository of knowledge of Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) systems, styles, masters, history, literature and virtual artifacts. The writing ranges from incisive to light-hearted to even controversial, and the literary and virtual exhibits encompass all aspects of Filipino martial arts systems and disciplines including arnis, kali, eskrima, dumog, buno, hilot and other indigenous arts of the Philippines. Authors are well-known experts in their fields as well as volunteer writers. Article submissions are encouraged. The authors of these articles have consented to have their articles reprinted and republished in whole or in part, as long as the author’s name, website reference address and this website are acknowledged. I would like this site to become the most comprehensive online reader-written encyclopedia on FMA. It is meant to be a contemporary or living as well as an archival museum. Send your submissions for The Top 200 Living Masters, The Top 100 FMA Schools and other FMA Museum Who’s Who series, and then see your submissions published online. We also accept original articles and online book publications. http://www.filipinomartialartsmuseum.com/index.htm   http://www.filipinomartialartsmuseum.com/FMA_masters-systems-schools/FMAguros-living-list.html 1 Dino Flores Lameco Los Angeles, CA, USA 2 Hospecio Balani Lameco Los Angeles, CA, USA 3 David Gould Lameco 4 Leonard Trigg Lameco 5 Arnold Noche Lameco Los Angeles, CA, USA 6 John Jacobo Bakbakan Maryland, USA 7 Roger Agbulos Lameco North Hills, CA, USA 8 Marc Denny Dog Brothers CA, USA 9 Eric Knauss Dog Brothers CA, USA 10 Tim Hartman Modern Arnis USA 11 Kelly Worden Modern Arnis WA, USA 12 Myrlino Hufana Modern Arnis WA, USA 13 Jeffrey Delaney Modern Arnis Canada 14 Randi Schea Modern Arnis 15 Jay de Leon Modern Arnis, Los Angeles, CA, USA 16 Alvis Solis Seneres Arnis TX, USA 17 Ron Balicki Inosanto Kali Los Angeles, CA, USA 18 Diana Balicki Inosanto Kali Los Angeles, CA, USA 19 Ramon Rubia San Miguel Eskrima CA, USA 20 Mel Lopez Villabrille-Largusa 21 Greg Alland Dekiti-Tirsia-Siradas 22 Mary Ann Presas Modern Arnis San Pablo, CA, USA 23 Demetrio Presas Modern Arnis San Pablo, CA, USA 24 Remy Presas, Jr. Modern Arnis San Pablo, CA, USA 25 Tom Bolden Modern Arnis NY, USA 26 Jerome Barber Modern Arnis NY, USA 27 Percival “Val” Pableo Doce Pares 28 Graciella Casillas CA, USA 29 Raffy Pambuan Pambuan Tulisan Arnis FL, USA 30 Steven Dowd Arnis Balite Fallon, NV, USA 31 Hock Hochheim Modern Arnis, Kombatan TX, USA 32 Jorge Penafiel Balintawak Cincinatti, OH, USA 33 Larry Alcuizar Doce Pares Los Angeles, CA, USA 34 Felix Valencia Lameco Santa Barbara, CA, USA 35 Anthony Davis Cabales Serrada CA, USA 36 Sultan Uddin Cabales Serrada CA, USA 37 Darren Tibbon Cabales Serrada CA, USA 38 Jason Inay Inayan Eskrima San Jose, CA, USA 39 Jena Inay Inayan Eskrima San Jose, CA, USA 40 Ray Dionaldo Sayoc Kali FL, USA 41 Edwin Mosqueda Doce Pares 42 Nate Defensor Doce Pares Chicago, IL, USA 43 Conrado Manaois Manaois Eskrima Los Angeles, CA, USA 44 Dan Anderson Modern Arnis WA, USA 45 Rocky Pasiwk Modern Arnis 46 Ron Harris Original Filipino Tapado New Orleans, LA, USA 47 Tim Waid Pekiti-Tirsia TX, USA 48 Leslie Buck Pekiti-Tirsia TX, USA 49 Erwin Ballarta Pekiti-Tirsia TX, USA 50 Gaudencia Ruby Comjuka TX, USA 51 Phil Rapagna Lameco, Inosanto Kali Los Angeles, CA, USA 52 Victor Gendrano Inosanto Kali Los Angeles, CA, USA 53 Stephen Aron Inosanto Kali Glendora, CA, USA 54 Menandro “Anding” de Leon Arnis de Leon Garland, TX, USA 55 Jaime Abregana Hawaii, USA 56 Vincent Cabales Cabales Serrada CA, USA 57 Vincent Cabales, Jr. Cabales Serrada CA, USA 58 Carlito Bonjoc Mata sa Bagyo CA, USA 59 Mark Wiley Cabales Serrada 60 Tom Bisio San Miguel Eskrima 61 Rafael Kayanan Sayoc Kali 62 Tom Kier Sayoc Kali 63 Jeff Chung Sayoc Kali 64 Paul Vunak Inosanto Kali CA, USA 65 Burton Richardon Inosanto Kali HI, USA 66 Steve Grody Lameco 67 Steve Tarani 68 Blaise Loong 69 Cass Magda CA, USA 70 Rick Tucci Inosanto Kali Princeton, NJ 71 James A. Keating Comtech Walla Walla, WA, USA 72 Ed Goco Galang Las Vegas, NV, USA 73 Michael Replogle Modern Arnis USA 74 Felix Roiles Doce Pares Los Angeles, CA, USA 75 Spencer Gee Pananandata NY, USA 76 Bruce Ricketts Kali Ilustrisimo San Diego, CA, USA 77 Maurice Gatdula CA, USA 78 Mar de Leon Tumba-tumba Arnis San Diego, CA, USA 79 Chris Siangco Pedoy Derobio Eskrima San Diego, CA, USA 80 Ernie Reyes, Jr. San Jose, CA, USA 81 Alex France Kombatan CA, USA 82 Alex Ercia Kombatan CA, USA 83 Arthur Gonzalez De … [Read more...]

FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS – TYPHOON YOLANDA (HAIYAN) RELIEF SEMINAR. Saturday, 14 December 2013. Nashville, TN, USA

FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTIST TYPHOON YOLANDA (HAIYAN) RELIEF SEMINAR. Saturday, 14 December 2013. Nashville, TN, USA

Over the course of the last month, the Philippines has been rocked by a series of natural disasters. First was the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that destroyed homes, many historical churches, and buildings on the islands of Cebu and Bohol. And the most recent, super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), cut a path of destruction through our island nation and other parts of Southeast Asia. Yolanda (Haiyan) has been declared the most powerful typhoon to make landfall in recorded history. The US Navy Joint Typhoon Warning Center stated that at its height, the storm produced sustained winds around 319kph (198mph) with gusts topping out at 379kph (235mph). The final details of fatalities, injuries, and property damage are yet unknown as many areas were left without power and are out of communication with emergency management services. This is a public event open to anyone wishing to learn the foundational concepts and principles of the Filipino Martial Arts. Guro David Gould of Lameco Eskrima, Guro Viko Perrine, and Guro Jerome Teague will be taking participants through some of the fundamentals of their respective systems including: sword, stick, knife, empty, hands, and weapon disarming. This will be an amazing gathering and will benefit a worthy cause. To register, please contact Guro Jerome Teague at (615) 319-3992. Cost is $40 with ALL proceeds going to the Philippine Red Cross. We will also be taking donations of clothing and other essential items. More Info at: https://www.facebook.com/events/169367563261944/ … [Read more...]

MANONUDA For The Philippines Typhoon Victims – “Hubud Session”, Brussels, Belgium

Typhoon

    Join our semianr in aid to the Philippines. All the profit will be donated here: http://www.1212.be/fr/haiyanfr/actualites-haiyan/item/5358-encourageant … [Read more...]

Filipino Martial Arts Fund Raising Event in favour of the Philippines Typhoon Victims, Brussels, Belgium. December 15th, 2013.

Fund Raising Event Banner

South East Asian Martial Arts Martial Arts Research Systems Belgium - Fund Raising Event in favour of the Philippines Typhoon Victims, Brussels, Belgium. December 15th, 2013.       We are all doing Filipino Martial Arts and thus are directly connected to the Filippins. I am setting up an event to support the victime of the Hayian Typhon that causes huge damage in the Filipins recently. I would ask all of my Martial Arts friends to relay the information of the event. The goal of the event is to raise a maximum of funds, During the event your will have the opportunity to train Filipino Martial arts technique and see some demontration. The event is open to all, practicioner as non martial arts practicioner. To be able to join this event, it will be requested that the particpants to give a donation of 15€ minimum directly to the NGO "Action Against Hunger" & "Philippine Red Cross" or any other NGO actively involved in helping the Filipinos victimes. The reason we have choosen "Action Against Hunger" & "Philippine Red Cross" as main NGO, we know from friends who are currently linving in the Philipines that those NGO's are active all the year long doing concret actions. All donations given to any other NGO's are of course welcome. Minimum participation is fixed at 15€ To register send your details and a copy of the proove of payment at info@seama.eu The proof of payement will be the ticket entrance. Minimum participation is fixed at 15€ for a 3hours event. Web Site : Philippine Red Cross: http://www.redcross.org.ph/donate Action Against Hunger: http://www.actionagainsthunger.org/take-action/donate Many thanks for your involvment https://www.facebook.com/events/185510098307114/ http://www.seama.eu/a … [Read more...]

Kalis Ilustrisimo Book by Guro Peachie Baron on Punta y Daga to be released early 2014

punta book

Kalis Ilustrisimo Book by Guro Peachie Baron Saguin on Punta y Daga to be released early 2014         What Is It Like to Train with the Master of Kalis Ilustrisimo? By: Peachie Baron-Saguin Submitted by: Steven Dowd I first met Master Tony Diego when I joined Bakbakan International in 1989. He was a friend of the Master of Bakbakan Christopher Ricketts, and was invited frequently in our practice sessions, to share with the students of Bakbakan his style in sword and knife fighting. Master Tony Diego When Master Christopher Ricketts left for the States, I started training with Master Diego on a regular basis with his Binondo group, the Kalis Ilustrisimo. My training then took on a leap. I was showed the proper way to hold the blade, not to grip the handle too tight, to prevent it from being disarmed when struck heavily with another sword. I was then taught the different kinds and forms of striking and blocking, and the footwork and stances that goes for each attack and counter attack. I was asked to repeatedly execute a particular strike before moving on to the next. Master Diego has always reiterated the importance of a repetitive exercise for one to gain mastery of the form. Peachie Baron-Saguin training with Master Tony Diego Soon enough Master Diego taught me how to use the stick and knife at the same time. This style is called Puntai y Daga. From this style, my interest grew more and more and I always look forward to a sword play with Master Diego, where my speed and accuracy to block and strike are put to test, my distance and movements, checked and corrected. There are moments when Master Diego would attack me when my guard is down to find out how I would react. If I stopped, he would tell me not to think but just to react, otherwise I get hit. The word “sorry” is never use in the gym. If you get hit, it’s your fault. After considerable drills with a wooden sword, Master Diego gave me as a gift, a real sword to practice on. Again my strikes and counter strikes were checked. Using the real sword, Master Diego would ask me to execute the different strikes and counter strikes. The purpose of this exercise, he said, is to gain better control of the blade and to prevent improper techniques from developing, and thus trains the student to hit at the right angle. My first swordplay using a real sword with Master Diego was really scary, but then I passed with flying colors. Suffice it to say, I was taught not only to defend and attack on a standing position, but on a sitting and lying down position as well. The exercise of ascending and descending the stairs during a duel is so difficult and tiring. Disarming is also part of the drills. Training with Master Diego is not easy. I often find myself catching my breath during the swordplay, while Master Diego is laughing and comfortably attacking and parrying my strikes. At the end of each session, I am totally exhausted. My shoulders ache and I could hardly lift my arms. At home before going to bed, I would take a muscle relaxant to relieve the pain so I could train again in the next session. Master Tony Diego and Tommy Dy Tang (Tom) in action using a bladed bolo or sword in an exhib- ition of Kalis Ilustrisimo. Tom is an instructor of Kalis Ilustrisimo, owner of the gym in Binondo where the group practices. As I continue my training with Master Diego, I am learning not only the art of bladed weapons but also, the essence of a good swordsman, the discipline and the commitment that one must have to the art.   … [Read more...]

Some of the Combat, Massacres,Rebellions, Disputes And Calamities of the Philippine Islands according to the book “The Inhabitants of the Philippines” By Frederic H. Sawyer. 1900

pilipinas inhabintants

Some of the Combat, Massacres, Rebellions, Disputes And Calamities of the Philippine Islands. according to the Book_   The Inhabitants of the Philippines By Frederic H. Sawyer Memb. Inst. C.E., Memb. Inst. N.A. London Sampson Low, Marston and Company Limited St. Dunstan’s House Fetter Lane, Fleet Street, E.C. 1900     Some of the Combat, Massacres, Rebellions, Disputes And Calamities of the Philippine Islands.   1521. Magellan and several of his followers killed in action by the natives of Mactan, near Cebú; Juan Serrano and many other Spaniards treacherously killed by Hamabar, King of Cebú. 1525. Salazar fights the Portuguese off Mindanao, and suffers great losses in ships and men. 1568. Legaspi’s expedition attacked in Cebú by a Portuguese fleet, which was repulsed. 1570. Legaspi founds the city of Cebú, with the assistance of the Augustinians. 1571. Legaspi founds the city of Manila, with the assistance of the Augustinians. 1572. Juan Salcedo fights the Datto of Zambales, and delivers his subjects from oppression. 1574. Siege of Manila by the Chinese pirate Li-ma-hon with 95 small vessels and 2000 men. The Spaniards and natives repulse the attack. The pirates retire to Pangasinan, and are attacked and destroyed by Juan Salcedo. 1577. War against Mindanao and Joló, parts of which are occupied. Disputes between the missionaries and the military officers who desire to enrich themselves by enslaving the natives, which the former stoutly oppose, desiring to convert them, and grant them exemption from taxes according to the “Leyes de Indias.” They considered the cupidity of the soldiers as the chief obstacle to the conversion of the heathen. The Crown decided in favour of the natives, but they did not derive all the benefits they were entitled to, as the humane laws were not respected by the governors. The Franciscans arrived in Manila. 1580. Expedition sent by Gonzalo Ronquillo to Borneo to assist King Sirela. 1581. Expedition sent by the same to Cagayan to expel a Japanese corsair who had established himself there. The expedition succeeded, but with heavy loss. Expedition against the Igorrotes to get possession of the gold-mines, but without success. The Jesuits arrive in Manila. 1582. Expedition against the Molucas, under Sebastian Ronquillo.[390]An epidemic destroyed two-thirds of the expedition, which returned without accomplishing anything. Great disputes between the encomenderos and the friars in consequence of the ill-treatment of the natives by the former. Dissensions between the Bishop of Manila and the friars who refused to submit to his diocesan visit. Manila burnt down. 1584. Second expedition against the Molucas, with no better luck than the first. Rebellion of the Pampangos and Manila men, assisted by some Mahometans from Borneo. Combat between the English pirate, Thomas Schadesh, and Spanish vessels. Combat between the English adventurer Thomas Cavendish (afterwards Sir Thomas), and Spanish vessels. 1587. The Dominicans arrive in Manila. 1589. Rebellion in Cagayan and other provinces. 1593. Third expedition against the Molucas under Gomez Perez Dasmariñias. He had with him in his galley 80 Spaniards and 250 Chinese galley-slaves. In consequence of contrary winds, his vessel put into a port near Batangas for shelter. In the silence of the night, when the Spaniards were asleep, the galley-slaves arose and killed them all except a Franciscan friar and a secretary. Dasmariñias built the castle of Santiago, and fortified Manila with stone walls, cast a large number of guns, and established the college of Sta. Potenciana. 1596. The galleon which left Manila for Acapulco with rich merchandise, was obliged to enter a Japanese port by stress of weather, and was seized by the Japanese authorities. The crew were barbarously put to death. 1597. Expedition of Luis Perez Dasmariñias against Cambodia, which gained no advantage. 1598. The Audiencia re-established in Manila, and the bishopric raised to an archbishopric. Expedition against Mindanao and Joló, the people from which were committing great devastations in Visayas, taking hundreds of captives. Much fighting, and many killed on both sides, without any definite result. 1599. Destructive earthquake in Manila and neighbourhood. 1600. Great sea combat between four Spanish ships, commanded by Judge Morga, and two Dutch pirates. One of the Dutchmen was taken, but the other escaped. Another destructive earthquake on January 7th, and one less violent, but long, in November. 1603. Conspiracy of Eng-Cang and the Chinese against the Spaniards. The Chinese entrench themselves near Manila; Luis Perez Dasmariñias marches against them with 130 Spaniards. They were all killed and decapitated by the … [Read more...]

BOOK: True Version of the Philippine Revolution By Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy President of the Philippine Republic., Tarlak (Philippine Islands), 23rd September, 1899

Aguinaldo-Emilio

True Version of the Philippine Revolution By Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy President of the Philippine Republic. Tarlak (Philippine Islands), 23rd September, 1899 To All Civilized Nations and Especially to the Great North American Republic I dedicate to you this modest work with a view to informing you respecting the international events which have occurred during the past three years and are still going on in the Philippines, in order that you may be fully acquainted with the facts and be thereby placed in a position to pronounce judgment upon the issue and be satisfied and assured of the Justice which forms the basis and is in fact the foundation of our Cause. I place the simple truth respectfully before and dedicate it to you as an act of homage and as testimony of my admiration for and recognition of the wide knowledge, the brilliant achievements and the great power of other nations, whom I salute, in the name the Philippine nation, with every effusion of my soul. The Author. Page 1 The Revolution of 1896 Spain maintained control of the Philippine Islands for more than three centuries and a half, during which period the tyranny, misconduct and abuses of the Friars and the Civil and Military Administration exhausted the patience of the natives and caused them to make a desperate effort to shake off the unbearable galling yoke on the 26th and 31st August, 1896, then commencing the revolution in the provinces of Manila and Cavite. On these memorable days the people of Balintawak, Santa Mesa, Kalookan, Kawit, Noveleta and San Francisco de Malabon rose against the Spaniards and proclaimed the Independence of the Philippines, and in the course of the next five days these uprisings were followed by the inhabitants of the other towns in Cavite province joining in the revolt against the Spanish Government although there was no previous arrangement looking to a general revolt. The latter were undoubtedly moved to action by the noble example of the former.Page 2 With regard to the rising in the province of Cavite it should be stated that although a call to arms bearing the signatures of Don Augustin Rieta, Don Candido Firona and myself, who were Lieutenants of the Revolutionary Forces, was circulated there was no certainty about the orders being obeyed, or even received by the people, for it happened that one copy of the orders fell into the hands of a Spaniard named Don Fernando Parga, Military Governor of the province, who at that time was exercising the functions of Civil Governor, who promptly reported its contents to the Captain-General of the Philippines, Don Ramon Blanco y Erenas. The latter at once issued orders for the Spanish troops to attack the revolutionary forces. It would appear beyond doubt that One whom eye of man hath not seen in his wisdom and mercy ordained that the emancipation of the oppressed people of the Philippines should be undertaken at this time, for otherwise it is inexplicable how men armed only with sticks andgulok1 wholly unorganized and undisciplined, could defeat the Spanish Regulars in severe engagements at Bakoor, Imus and Noveleta and, in addition to making many of them prisoners, captured a large quantity of arms and ammunition. It was owing to this astonishing success of the revolutionary troops that General Blanco quickly concluded to endeavour, to maintain Spanish control by the adoption of a Page 3conciliatory policy under the pretext that thereby he could quel the rebellion, his first act being a declaration to the effect that it was not the purpose of his Government to oppress the people and he had no desire “to slaughter the Filipinos.”. The Government of Madrid disapproved of General Blanco's new policy and speedily appointed Lieutenant-General Don Camilo Polavieja to supersede him, and despatched forthwith a large number of Regulars to the Philippines. General Polavieja advanced against the revolutionary forces with 16,000 men armed with Mausers, and one field battery. He had scarcely reconquered half of Cavite province when he resigned, owing to bad health. That was in April, 1897. Polavieja was succeeded by the veteran General Don Fernando Primo de Rivera, who had seen much active service. As soon as Rivera had taken over command of the Forces he personally led his army in the assault upon and pursuit of the revolutionary forces, and so firmly, as well as humanely, was the campaign conducted that he soon reconquered the whole of Cavite province and drove the insurgents into the mountains. Then I established my headquarters in the wild and unexplored mountain fastness of Biak-na-bató, where I formed the Republican Government of the Philippines at the end of May, 1897.Page 4 1 A kind of sword—Translator. The Treaty of Biak-na-bató Don Pedro Alejandro Paterno (who was appointed by the Spanish Governor-General sole mediator in the discussion of the terms of peace) visited Biak-na-bató several times to negotiate terms of … [Read more...]

Baybayin – The Ancient Script of the Philippines by Paul Morrow

Ang Baybayin

Baybayin - The Ancient Script of the Philippines  by Paul Morrow   This language of ours is like any other, it once had an alphabet and its own letters that vanished as though a tempest had set upon a boat on a lake in a time now long gone. "To My Fellow Children”, attributed to Jose Rizal, 1869 English translation by P. Morrow The tempest in Rizal's verse struck the Philippines in the 16th century. It was the Spanish Empire and the lost alphabet was a script that is known today as the baybayin. Contrary to the common misconception, when the Spaniards arrived in the islands they found more than just a loose collection of backward and belligerent tribes. They found a civilization that was very different from their own. The ability to read and write is the mark of any civilization and, according to many early Spanish accounts, the Tagalogs had already been writing with the baybayin for at least a century. This script was just beginning to spread throughout the islands at that time. Furthermore, the discovery in 1987 of an inscription on a sheet of copper in Laguna is evidence that there was an even more advanced script in limited use in the Philippines as far back as the year 900 C.E.  (See The Laguna Copperplate Inscription) Continue at: http://www.mts.net/~pmorrow/bayeng1.htm … [Read more...]

BOOK: Anting-Anting Stories And Other Strange Tales of the Filipinos By Sargent Kayme. Boston: Small, Maynard & Company. 1901

Anting-Anting-Stories-218x340

Anting-Anting Stories And Other Strange Tales of the Filipinos By Sargent Kayme Boston: Small, Maynard & Company 1901 [Contents]Copyright, 1901, by Small, Maynard & Company (Incorporated)Entered at Stationers’ HallPress of J. J. Arakelyan Boston, U.S.A.[V] [Contents] Foreword The life of the inhabitants of the far-away Eastern islands in which the people of the United States are now so vitally interested opens to our literature a new field not less fresh and original than that which came to us when Mr. Kipling first published his Indian tales. India had always possessed its wonders and its remarkable types, but they waited long for adequate expression. No less wonderful and varied are the inhabitants and the phenomena of the Philippines, and a new author, showing rare knowledge of the country and its strange peoples, now gives us a collection of simple yet powerful stories which bring them before us with dramatic vividness. Pirates, half naked natives, pearls, man-apes, towering volcanoes about whose summits clouds and unearthly traditions float together, strange animals and birds, and stranger men, pythons, bejuco ropes stained with human blood, feathering palm trees now fanned by soft breezes and now crushed to the ground by tornadoes;—on no mimic stage was ever a more [VI]wonderful scene set for such a company of actors. That the truly remarkable stories written by Sargent Kayme do not exaggerate the realities of this strange life can be easily seen by any one who has read the letters from press correspondents, our soldiers, or the more formal books of travel. Strangest, perhaps, of all these possibilities for fiction is the anting-anting, at once a mysterious power to protect its possessor and the outward symbol of the protection. No more curious fetich can be found in the history of folk-lore. A button, a coin, a bit of paper with unintelligible words scribbled upon it, a bone, a stone, a garment, anything, almost—often a thing of no intrinsic value—its owner has been known to walk up to the muzzle of a loaded musket or rush upon the point of a bayonet with a confidence so sublime as to silence ridicule and to command admiration if not respect. The Editor.[VII] [Contents] Contents The Anting-Anting of Captain Von Tollig1 The Cave in the Side of Coron21 The Conjure Man of Siargao41 Mrs. Hannah Smith, Nurse65 The Fifteenth Wife93 “Our Lady of Pilar”113 A Question of Time131 The Spirit of Mount Apo153 With What Measure Ye Mete179 Told at the Club195 Pearls of Sulu211 [3] [Contents] Anting-Anting Stories The Anting-Anting of Captain Von Tollig There had been a battle between the American forces and the Tagalogs, and the natives had been driven back. The stone church of Santa Maria, around which the engagement had been hottest, and far beyond which the native lines had now been driven, had been turned into a hospital for the wounded Tagalogs left by their comrades on the field. Beneath a broad thatched shed behind the church lay the bodies of the dead, stiff and still under the coverings of cocoanut-fibre cloth thrown hastily over them. The light of a full tropic moon threw the shadow of the roof over them like a soft, brown velvet pall. They were to be buried between day-break and sunrise, that the men who buried them might escape the heat of the day. The American picket lines had been posted a quarter of a mile beyond the church, near which no other guards had been placed. Not long after midnight a surgeon, one of the two [4]men left on duty in the church, happened to look out through a broken window towards the shed, and in the shadow, against the open moonlight-flooded field beyond, saw something moving. Looking close he could make out the slim, brown figure of a native passing swiftly from one covered form to another, and turning back the cocoanut-fibre cloth to look at each dead man’s face. Calling the man who was working with him the surgeon pointed out the man beneath the shed to him. “That fellow has no business there,” he said, “He has slipped through the lines in some way. He may be a spy, but even if he is not, he is here for no good. We must capture him.” “All right,” was the answer. “You go around the church one way, and I will come the other.” When the surgeon, outside the hospital, reached a place where he could see the shed again, the Tagalog had ceased his search. He had found the body he was looking for, and sunk down on his knees beside it was [5]searching for something in the clothing which covered the dead man’s breast. A moment later he had seen the men stealing towards him from the church, had cleared the open space beneath the shed at a leap, and was off in the moonlight, running towards the outposts. The surgeons swore; and one fired a shot after him from his revolver. “Might as well shoot at the shadow of that palm tree,” the one who had shot said. … [Read more...]

SILENT FILM: Philippine American War – Advance of Kansas Volunteers at Caloocan by Thomas A. Edison; 5 June 1899

Philippine American War

Philippine American War - Advance of Kansas Volunteers at Caloocan by Thomas A. Edison; 5 June 1899 From LibraryOfCongress, Washinton D.C.   Comment by Mandirigma.org: At the time of this production, film was a brand new medium. This Film by Thomas Edison shows Filipino Freedom Fighters defending their country against  American Invaders. However the director portrays the Filipinos as "Rebels" and the Americans as defenders of "Freedom" and "Liberty" who overcome the "Insurgents".   http://youtu.be/_ZjrPU6rPHE     SUMMARY From Edison films catalog: From the thick underbrush where the Filipinos are massed comes volley after volley. They are making one of those determined stands that marks Caloocan as the bloodiest battle of the Filipino rebellion. Suddenly, with impetuous rush, Funston's men appear. They pause but for a moment, to fire, reload and fire. The color bearer falls, but the standard is caught up by brave Sergeant Squires and waves undaunted in the smoke and din of the receding battle. This is one of the best battle pictures ever made. The first firing is done directly toward the front of the picture, and the advance of the U.S. troops apparently through the screen is very exciting; the gradual disappearance of the fighters sustaining the interest to the end. 65 feet. $9.75. NOTES Copyright: Thomas A. Edison; 5June1899; 37443. Original main title lacking. Reenacted by the New Jersey National Guard. Materials listed originate from the paper print chosen best copy of two for digitization; for other holdings on this title, contact M/B/RS reference staff. Edison code name (for telegraphic orders): Unbroached. MAVIS 47087; Advance of Kansas Volunteers at Caloocan. Reenacted May 1899 in the Orange Mountains near West Orange, New Jersey. Sources used: Copyright catalog, motion pictures, 1894-1912; Musser, C. Edison motion pictures 1890-1900, 1997; Niver, K.R. Early motion pictures, 1985; Edison films catalog, no. 94, March 1900, p. 4 [MI]; Edison films catalog, no. 105, July 1901, p. 30 [MI]. SUBJECTS United States.--Army.--Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 20th. Philippines--History--Philippine American War, 1899-1902--Battlefields. Battles--Philippines. Soldiers. Revolutionaries--Philippines. Funston, Frederick,--1865-1917--Military leadership. Battle casualties--Philippines. Flags--United States. War films. Historical reenactments (Motion pictures) Short films. Silent films. Nonfiction films. RELATED NAMES White, James H. (James Henry), production. New Jersey. National Guard. Thomas A. Edison, Inc. Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress) CALL NUMBER FEC 2820 (ref print) FPE 9628 (dupe neg) FPE 9135 (masterpos) LC 973a (paper pos) DIGITAL ID sawmp 0973 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/sawmp.0973   … [Read more...]

Fundraiser for Master Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo, July 2013

Master Tony Diego, Ilustrisimo, Kali Ilustrisimo, Kalis Ilustrisimo, Antonio Ilustrisimo, Arnis, Escrima, www.http://mandirigma.org, www.http://backyardeskrima.com/

  Greetings friends, We are seeking assistance for Master Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo. Master Diego's wife has breast cancer and has just had surgery for the second time. Sadly, even with surgery it has spread and costly chemotherapy is required. Master Diego is retired from work and has no medical or retirement benefits, so any amount donated will be very much appreciated and put to good use. If you would like to donate you can contact Dino at: mandirigma.org@gmail.com or you can contact Peachie Baron at:  peachiebaron@facebook.com … [Read more...]

The Films of Bakbakan Philippines member Master Ronnie Ricketts and the Warrior Arts of the Philippines

The Films of  Bakbakan Philippines member Ronnie Ricketts and the Warrior Arts of the Philippines ilustrisimo bakbakab

The Films of  Bakbakan Philippines member Ronnie Ricketts and the Warrior Arts of the Philippines Ronnie Ricketts is an actor, film producer and film director in the Philippine Movie and Film Industry. What is less commonly know is that he is a martial artist expert and a Master instructor in the Martial Arts group, Bakbakan International. He is currently the Chairman of the Optical Media Board (OMB), a Philippine Government Agency, which combats piracy of films, music, computer games and software. Ronnie in versed in several forms on Martial arts including the Filipino Warrior Art Kali Ilustrisimo. Ronnie is the brother of Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts the founder of the Martial Arts Brotherhood - Bakbakan International. Several of Ronnie's films feature the Martial Arts including the Warrior Arts of the Philippines generally know as Kali, Arnis or Eskrima. Bakbakan Members frequently appear in Ronnies movies. Ronnies latest movie "The Fighting Chefs". Some scenes feature the Philippines Martial Arts performed by himself and his nephews Bruce and Brandon Ricketts. Bruce and Brandon are Martial Arts experts and instructors in Kali Ilustrisimo.    Behind the scence for the movie "The Fighting Chefs. Ronnie with nephews Bruce and Brandons rehearsing some Ilustrisimo Filipino Martial Arts moves for the scene.   Ronnie with his brother, Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts. Poster for Mano Mano 3: The Lost Art.   Ronnie Ricketts Filmography 2013 The Fighting Chefs 2007 One Percent Full 2006 Lagot Ka Sa Kuya Ko 2005 Uno 2004 Mano Mano 3: Arnis The Lost Art 2003 Utang Ng Ama - Director (Uncredited) 2003 Dayo 2001 Mano Mano 2: Ubusan Ng Lakas 1999 Ang Boyfriend Kong Pari 1999 Desperado, Bahala Na Ang Itaas 1998 May Sayad 1998 My Guardian Debil 1998 Kamandag Ko Ang Papatay Sa 'Yo (Released Date: 4 February 1998) 1998 Anting-Anting 1997 Emong Salvacion 1997 Ilaban Mo Bayan Ko 1997 Wala Ka Ng Puwang Sa Mundo (Released Date: 22 October 1997) 1996 Kahit Sa Bala Kakapit Ako (Released Date: 9 October 1996) 1996 Hawak Ko Buhay Mo (Released Date: 25 September 1996) 1996 Madaling Mamatay, Mahirap Mabuhay (Released Date: 22 May 1996) 1995 Huwag Mong Isuko Ang Laban (Released Date: 25 December 1995) to (1995 MMFF) 1995 Mano Mano 1995 Angel On Fire 1995 Ultimate Revenge 1995 Matinik Na Kalaban (Released Date: 8 November 1995) 1994 Matira Ang Matibay (Released Date: 22 June 1994) 1993 Maton (Directed by: TOTO NATIVIDAD) (Released Date: 24 November 1993) 1993 Pambato (Released Date: 6 October 1993) 1993 Ikaw Lang (Released Date: 25 August 1993) 1993 Alejandro 'Diablo' Malubay (Released Date: 26 May 1993) 1992 Boy Recto (Released Date: 25 December 1992) to (1992 MMFF) 1992 Basagulero (Released Date: 14 October 1992) 1992 Dalawa man ang Buhay mo Pagsasabayin ko (Released Date: 12 August 1992) 1992 Aguila At Guerrero (Released Date: 22 July 1992) 1992 True Confessions (Evelyn, Myrna, & Margie) 1992 Zei Fa Wei Long 1991 Ganti Ng Api 1991 Kumukulong Dugo 1991 Anak ng Dagat 1990 Baril ko ang Uusig (Released Date: 14 November 1990) 1990 Isa-Isahin Ko Kayo (Released Date: 6 June 1990) 1990 Kakampi Ko Ang Diyos (Released Date: 8 May 1990) 1989 My Darling Domestic (Greyt Eskeyp) 1989 Black Sheep Baby (Released Date: 22 November 1989) 1989 UZI Brothers (Released Date: 27 September 1989) 1989 Uzi Brothers 9mm (Released Date: 9 August 1989) 1989 Tatak Ng Isang Api (Released Date: 26 April 1989) 1989 Gapos Gang (Released Date: 22 March 1989) 1988 Alex Boncayao Brigade: The Liquidation Arm Of The Npa 1988 Kumakasa, Kahit Nag-iisa 1988 Tumayo Ka't Lumaban 1988 Target: Maganto 1987 The Rookies And The Mighty Kids 1987 Mga Agila Ng Arkong Bato 1987 Ambush 1987 Target Sparrow Unit 1987 Cabarlo 1987 Kamandag Ng Kris 1986 Payaso 1986 Nakagapos Na Puso 1986 Agaw Armas 1986 Bodyguard: Masyong Bagwisa Jr. 1986 I Love You Mama, I Love You Papa 1986 The Graduates 1986 John En Marsha '86 TNT Sa America 1986 Dongalo Massacre 1985 The Crazy Professor 1985 Heated Vengeance 1984 Sa Hirap At Ginhawa 1983 Love Birds 1983 I Love You, I Hate You 1982 Good Morning, Professor 1982 My Heart Belongs To Daddy Directed by Ronnie Ricketts Rumble Boy (2007) Lagot ka sa kuya ko (2006) (as Ronn Rick) ... aka Isusumbong kita sa kuya ko (Uno (2005) (as Ronn Rick) Mano Mano 3: Arnis, the Lost Art (2004) (as Ronn Rick) Dayo (2003) (as Ronn Rick) Boyfriend kong pari, Ang (1999) (as Ronn Rick) Boy Buluran (1997) (as Ronn Rick) Wala ka nang puwang sa mundo (1997) (as Ronn Rick) Madaling mamatay, mahirap mabuhay (1996) (as Ronn Rick) Produced: Lagot ka sa kuya ko (2006) ... aka Isusumbong kita sa kuya ko (Philippines: Tagalog title) Mano Mano 3: Arnis, the Lost Art (2004) (producer) Wrote: Mano Mano 3: Arnis, the Lost Art (2004) Huwag mong isuko … [Read more...]

Second Lameco Eskrima DVD featuring Guro Dino Flores released by Budo International

guro dino flores budo

Second Lameco Eskrima DVD featuring Guro Dino Flores released by Budo International This dvd is focused in long distance with the sword, a special training that was heavily influenced by Great Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo. Guro Flores will teach you the differences in strategy in long distance with either stick or sword, the footwork and five of the 12 Eskrima Drills in detail with their applications and variations. Guro Dino Flores has focused this work on long range distance, a distance you must master before venturing into medium or short range distance with any weapon and without protective gear. The 12 Eskrima Drills are a combination of the movements Punong Gruo Sulite found most common in real combat situations and referred to them as the “Soul of Lameco”, because many hidden secrets are found in these apparently simple exercises. Though most of the Eskrima exercises can be done either with stick or sword, this dvd is focused in long distance with the sword, a special training that was heavily influenced by Great Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo. Guro Flores will teach you the differences in strategy in long distance with either stick or sword, the footwork and five of the 12 Eskrima Drills in detail with their applications and variations. These exercises are essential in order to understand the Great Art of Fighting know as Lameco Eskrima. LANGUAGES: ENGLISH. ESPAÑOL, ITALIANO, FRANÇAIS http://www.budointernational.net/296_dino-flores   http://youtu.be/kb2291PfCms     Information on the first DVD can be found at this link: http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=361 … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma and other Eskrima Groups to perform at the 22nd Festival of Philippine Arts and Culture, 2013 in Los Angeles

fpac 22 2013

    Kapisanang Mandirigma and other Eskrima Groups to perform at the 22nd Festival of Philippine Arts and Culture, 2013 in Los Angeles     http://fpacpahayag.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/martial-artists/           The iconic festival and annual celebration returns, now in its 22nd year! FilAm ARTS invites you to join us Sep.7-8 at Pt Fermin Park for the largest and longest-running community tradition in Southern California -- the only event where you can see over 500 artists & performers from all over the world entertain you and 25,000 of your closest friends & family! Advance tickets are available at http://fpac22.eventbrite.com/ Whether it's your first time or 22nd, it's always a party at FPAC. Bring everyone you can to the Filipino party of the year! FPAC is produced by FilAm ARTS - the Association for the Advancement of Filipino American Arts & Culture, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, and sponsored by the City of Los Angeles, LA County Arts Commission, California Arts Council, National Endowment for the Arts, California Community Foundation, Toyota, The Getty Foundation, LA-18, Mavshack, The Asian Journal, Weekend Balita, BakitWhy.com, Oishi Media, The James Irvine Foundation, and LEAP, Inc.   Martial Artists Posted on May 13, 2013 Nick Papadakis Kombat Instruments Ltd. Nick “Pappy” Papadakis has 30 years experience in the martial arts with over 100 fights in the Dog Brothers Gathering of the Pack. Instructor Pekiti Tirsia Kali, Full Instructor Dog Brothers Martial Arts, Blue Belt BJJ, 2nd degree black belt North American Self Defense Institute Kombat Instruments Ltd. is a company created to serve the needs of combat martial artists by providing durable gear for full-contact stick fighting and weapon matches. For more information on Nick or Kombat Instruments Ltd visit www.bloodsport.com  ::: Master Joe Tan Modern Tapado Joe feels very lucky and privileged to have trained personally and forged friendship with the original founders of these three Arnis groups that have made their own unique contributions in the propagation of Stick fighting as an Art. He has lot to share with the world. Tapado is an Original Filipino Martial Art which came from a Hiligaynon ( a Filipino dialect) word ‘Tapat’ or ‘Tapos’ which means – finished or done in english.or to finish the job in one strike. For more information visit www.mastertapadoarnis.com  :::  Willie Laureano FMA Instructor Guro Willie Laureano is a Kali, Silat, and Kickboxing instructor at Elite Training Center.  Willie says, “I am proud to be associated with Elite Training Center where I offer the best in all aspects of the Martial way including physical training respect and confidence.” Willie has lots of Martial Arts training and teaching experience. He has even trained and taught under Guro Dan Inosanto. He has also trained and taught alongside many notable instructors from around the world. Elite Training Center is a martial arts school focusing on self-defense and fitness. Teaching confidence while respecting others, they are founded on the four principals of Respect, Honor, Discipline, and Strength. Techniques include LOTAR®(Close Quarter Battle techniques) and Krav Maga (intuitive self-defense independent of strength or size), Muay Thai kickboxing, Adult Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) as sport, Youth MMA that emphasizes our founding principles, and Kali/Silat/Eskrima (Filipino open hand and stick fighting). For more information visit www.elitetrainingcenter.net  ::: Dino Flores The Kapisanang Mandirigma Eskrima Training Institute Guro Dino has taught numerous seminars and classes over the years. He has appeared on Television, Instructional Videos, Independent Film and Radio Shows promoting the arts. He has contributed to magazine article for publications such as “Masters”, “Blitz” and “FMA Digest. Guro Dino has also contributed to book publications including “Masters of the Blade” and “Warrior Arts of the Philippines”. He is currently working on several book and video projects for various masters.

Guro Dino has conducted numerous seminars, lectures and demonstrations. Including conferences at UCLA, Cal State Fullerton, University of California Irvine, Loyola Marymount University, Glendale College, Cherry Blossom Festival, Lotus Festival, Philippie Tourism Expo, Sports Expo in Manila, Balintawak Cuentada Gathering Las Vegas and The Festival of Philippine Arts & Culture to name a few. Guro Dino was one of the first instructors invited to the World Filipino Martial Arts Association EXPO in Seattle, Washinton in 1993. One of his proudest moments was to be one of two cultural groups (the othe one being traditional dance) to perform in the world famous Los Angeles City Hall during the televised dedication of the the very first official … [Read more...]

2nd FMA Charity Festival in Trebur, Germany for Grandmaster Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo

Master Tony Dieg Ilustrisimo Kalis

2nd FMA Charity Festival in Trebur, Germany for Grandmaster Tony Diego of  Kalis Ilustrisimo https://www.facebook.com/events/492191180856607/?notif_t=plan_edited "Master Tony's wife has breast cancer and had her second surgery last week. Even with the surgery though, it has spread and chemo therapy is needed. Master Tony is very much affected. Master Diego is retired from work and has no medical or retirement benefits. They had been saving money to operate on Master Diego's knees as they have deteriorated considerably in recent years. Master Diego is constantly in pain because of it. When the cancer was discovered, all the saved knee operation funds went to his wife's first cancer operation costs."   Instructors: GM Datu Dieter Knuettel (National Coach Modern Arnis) Master Philipp Wolf (NickelStick Balintawak Eskrima) Guro Flavio Ruiz Van Hoof (M.A.R.S.) Guro Tobias Ricker (Cacoy Doce Pares) Guro Jojo Balinado (Balinado Arnis Krusada) Guro Lars Helms (Pekiti Tirsia Kali) Hanjo Bergmann (Giron Arnis Eskrima) Andreas Hofmann (Filipino Fighting Arts) Joe Brandt (Lightning Scientific Arnis) Christof Froehlich (Lameco Eskrima) Minimum Donation: 25€ you are more than welcome to donate more;-) ALL DONATIONS GO DIRECTLY TOWARDS GM TONY DIEGO WITHOUT ANY COMMISIONS!! MORE INFORMATIONS FOLLOW https://www.facebook.com/events/492191180856607/?notif_t=plan_edited Organized by Christof Froehlich of Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany and Lameco Eskrima Germany … [Read more...]

Magazine interview featuring Guro Dino Flores in July, 2013 issue of Cinturon Negro

guro dino flores www.mandirigma.org

Magazine interview featuring Guro Dino Flores in July, 2013 issue of Cinturon Negro http://www.budointernational.net/         … [Read more...]

Massive balangay ‘mother boat’ unearthed in Butuan By TJ DIMACALI,GMA News

mandirigma.org kali arnis escrima eskrima

Massive balangay 'mother boat' unearthed in Butuan By TJ DIMACALI,GMA News The largest sailing vessel of its kind yet discovered is being unearthed in Butuan City in Mindanao, and it promises to rewrite Philippine maritime history as we know it. Estimated to be around 800 years old, the plank vessel may be centuries older than the ships used by European explorers in the 16th century when they first came upon the archipelago later named after a Spanish king, Las Islas Felipenas. Continue at: http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/321334/scitech/science/massive-balangay-mother-boat-unearthed-in-butuan The find also underscores theories that the Philippines, and Butuan in particular, was a major center for cultural, religious, and commercial relations in Southeast Asia. 'Nails' the size of soda cans National Museum archeologist Dr. Mary Jane Louise A. Bolunia, who leads the research team at the site, says almost everything about the newly-discovered "balangay" is massive.She holds up her hand and curls her fingers into a circle, as if grasping a soda can. "That's just one of the treenails used in its construction," Bolunia says. An aptly descriptive term, a "treenail" is a wooden peg or dowel used in place of iron nails in boatbuilding. So with "nails" that size, exactly how big is this boat? Dr. Bolunia produces a piece of onionskin paper with a carefully-inked map of the archeological site. On the upper corner is a roughly pea pod-shaped boat wreck, about 15 meters long, one of nine similarly-sized balangays discovered at the site since the 1970's. But right next to it, discovered only in 2012, are what seem to be the remains of another balangay so wide that it could easily fit the smaller craft into itself twice over – and that's just the part that's been excavated so far. Although the boat has yet to be fully excavated, it's estimated to be at least 25 meters long. Aside from the treenails, the individual planks alone are each as broad as a man's chest – roughly twice the width of those used in other balangays on the site. The planks are so large that they can no longer be duplicated, because there are no more trees today big enough to make boards that size, according to Dr. Bolunia. Proceeding with caution Historians, and Bolunia herself, caution that much work still needs to be done before the boat can be conclusively dated and identified."(The newly-discovered boat) will need more technical verification to establish its connection and relationship with the other boats already excavated, so that we can know its date, boat typology, and technology," said Dr. Maria Bernadette L. Abrera, professor and chairperson of the Department of History at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, in an email interview. "We have to be careful," said Ramon Villegas, a scholar who has done extensive research on pre-colonial Philippine history. "There has not been enough time to study (the artifacts). It could be a Spanish boat or Chinese junk." Aside from carbon dating to determine the age of the wood, the construction techniques used and even the type of wood itself need to be ascertained before anyone can come to a definitive conclusion. "Everything depends on the construction, on how the boat was built, before you can properly call it a 'balangay'," explains archeologist and anthropologist Dr. Jesus Peralta. He said he has yet to see the newfound boat for himself. Nevertheless, the boat's proximity to previous sites of buried balangays promises to send ripples through the academic world. "It's a 'mother boat'," Dr. Bolunia says with little hesitation, "and it's changing the way we think about ancient Filipino seafarers." Rewriting Philippine history It has long been established that Filipinos traveled across Southeast Asia as early as the 10th century, reaching as far as Champa – what is now the eastern coast of Vietnam – in groups of balangays. These groups or flotillas have always been thought to consist of similarly-sized small vessels, an idea perpetuated by the term "barangay" – the smallest administrative division of the present-day Philippine government. But, according to Dr. Bolunia, this new discovery suggests that these may just have been support vessels for a much larger main boat, where trade goods and other supplies were likely to have been held for safekeeping. The discovery also suggests that seafaring Filipinos were much more organized and centralized than previously thought. Butuan as a major center of culture and trade "This balangay reinforces the findings of the earlier excavations about the role of Butuan as a commercial and population center in precolonial Philippines," Abrera told GMA News."Butuan seaport had long-time trade links with Champa and Guandong (China). You can retrace the importance of (the newly-discovered boat) by utilizing it as an archeological key to that period when Butuan … [Read more...]

FMA Fundraising Seminar Friday, 16 August 2013, Idar-Oberstein, Germany

Fundraiser kali arnis eskrima escrima kalis fma Fundraiser kali arnis eskrima escrima kalis fma Fundraiser kali arnis eskrima escrima kalis fma 2013

FMA Fundraising Seminar Friday, 16 August 2013, Idar-Oberstein, Germany   FMA Fundraising Seminar schedule of training: August 16. Freiday, 10 am - 12 noon, 14 pm - 18 pm August 17. Saturday 10 am - 12 noon, 14 pm - 18 pm August 18. Sonnday 10 am - 14 pm … [Read more...]

Katipunero: Simeón Ola y Arboleda -Philippine Revolution Hero and the last General to surrender to American forces during the Philippine-American War

backyard eskrima

  The Paternal Great Grandfather of Mandirigma.orgs' Guro Dino Flores, Segundo Flores was a Katipunero serving under the General Simeón Ola y Arboleda in the Bicol Region. Major Simeón Ola y Arboleda was under General Vito Belarmino, the Zone Commander of the Revolutionary Forces in the Bicol Region. ---------- Simeón Ola y Arboleda Municipal President of Albay, In office 1904–1908 Born: 2 September 1865 Guinobatan, Albay, Philippines Died : 14 February 1952 (aged 86) Guinobatan, Albay, Philippines Organization: Katipunan Simeón Ola y Arboleda (September 2, 1865 – February 14, 1952) was a hero of the Philippine Revolution and the last general to surrender to American forces during the Philippine-American War. Biography Simeon Ola was born on September 2, 1865 to Vicente Ola and Apolonia Arboleda, who were ordinary citizens with little money. He was enrolled in Holy Rosary Minor Seminary and studied Philosophy, but didn't finish the course. He joined the local branch of the Katipunan in his hometown province of Albay and later became the leader. With the help of a parish priest he was able to acquire arms to support his men. He was promoted to the rank of captain after the battle of Camalig in Albay, 1898 and again promoted to the rank of major after a daring ambush mission that led to the capture of three Americans. He was also the leader of the subsequent valiant attacks on Albay towns namely, Oas, Ligao and Jovellar. He later surrendered on the condition that his men would be granted amnesty. He was put on trial and was proven guilty of sedition and was sentenced to thirty years in prison. In 1904, he was given a pardon and returned to his place of birth and became the municipal president. The regional police command in Legazpi City was name after him. SIMEON A. OLA (1865-1952) Revolutionist In Guinobatan, Albay hailed Simeon Ola, the man who would lead the Bicolanos fight for their freedom. He was born on September 2, 1865 to Vicente Ola and Apolonia Arboleda. Ola was highly regarded in Guinobatan, being the teniente de cuadrillos and a trusted confidant of Father Carlos Cabido, the parish priest of his town. These positions helped him carry out his revolutionary works – recruiting men and acquiring firearms for the revolutionary army. He connived with the jail warden in his town, Sergeant Loame, to free about 93 prisoners. The prisoners soon joined his army. In April 1898, he fought in the battle of Camalig. General Vito Belarmino, the Zone Commander of the Revolutionary Forces in the Bicol Region, designated him the rank of a Captain. Fully committed to the cause of the revolution, he also raised funds amounting to P42, 000.00, which he turned over to General Mariano Trias, Secretary of Finance of the Revolutionary Government. On January 23, 1900, he was promoted Major after he successfully effected an ambush and captured three American soldiers: Dubose, Fred Hunter and Russel. In February that same year, his troops fought against the Americans in Arimbay, Legaspi. His cousin Jose Arboleda perished in the bloody battle. American soldiers’ mighty firepower and combat training did not dampen his spirit; he continued to fight so that his men were encouraged and more men joined his army. With the army of Colonel Engracio Orence, he fought valiantly in the battle of Binogsacan in Guinobatan, Albay. His army rested for over a month in July 1901 when he accompanied General Belarmino to Manila. He resumed his campaign in August by raiding the town of Oas, Albay. On August 12, 1902, he ambushed the American detachment at Macabugos, Ligao. Ola became a marked man to the Americans. Although his troops were easily repulsed during battles, the Americans took him seriously. From March to October 1903, the Americans set up the reconcentration system as a means to stop Ola’s activities. Because of the damage it caused even to the innocent civilians, they turned into negotiations. They sent Ramon Santos and Major Jesse S. Garwood of the Constabulary as emissaries to negotiate for his surrender, which he politely refused. Instead, he carried on his battle. On July 15, 1903, he ambushed the 31st Philippine Scout Garrison under the command of Sergeant Nicolas Napoli in Joveliar, Albay. The persistent effort of the peace panel and his battle weary men made Ola realized that he could never win the war. He became open to the agreement set by Colonel Harry H. Bandholtz, the Assistant Commander of the Constabulary in Lucena, Tayabas, for his surrender. The agreement included general amnesty, fair treatment and justice to his comrades in arms. On September 25, 1903 the negotiating panel composed of Ramon Santos, Eligio Arboleda, Epifanio Orozco, Frank L. Pyle, John Paegelow, J.B. Allison and Joseph Rogers went to his camp in Malagnaton, Mapaco, Guinobatan. Eventually, Ola surrendered to Governor Bette and Colonel … [Read more...]

Emilio Aguinaldo filmed with actor Douglas Fairbanks, Philippines, 1931

Emilio Aguinaldo and Douglas Fairbanks his Cavite home March 26 1931

Emilio Aguinaldo filmed with actor Douglas Fairbanks, Philippines, 1931 http://youtu.be/QJyqxWhQ38o In 1931 Douglas Fairbanks went on a trip to Asia, and made a comic travelogue entitled "Around the World in 80 Minutes". The clip from the Philippines included a short speech in Spanish by Emilio Aguinaldo. Fairbanks was a movie producer and actor in silent films. He co-founded the American film studio United Artists and hosted the first Oscars Ceremony in 1929. La calidad del audio deja mucho que desear, pero me parece que el Sr. Aguinaldo dijo: "Os participo de que he dado la bienvenida a nuestro gran actor (?Douglas Fairbanks) de America. Por la misma razón espero que esta visita que nos ha dignado dicho gran actor,(???), estrechará más la armonía entre americanos y filipinos" Una traducción literal: I have given welcome to our great actor, Douglas Fairbanks, from America. For the same reason, I hope that this visit by this great actor, who has humbled himself to us, will develop greater harmony between Americans and Filipinos.     … [Read more...]

Sino pumatay kay Antonio Luna? – Philippine TV Show Crime Klasik – Episode #301 – June 8, 2012

General Antonio Luna

Sino pumatay kay Antonio Luna? - Philippine TV Show Crime Klasik - Episode #301 - June 8, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvBeckZI9Jo     Isa sa pinakamatapang at pinakamatalinong Heneral na lumaban sa mananakop si General Antonio Luna. Pero hindi tulad ng ibang bayani, sa kamay raw ng kapwa Pilipino natapos ang kaniyang buhay. Paano nabago nito ang ating kasaysayan?   Was it Aguinaldo who had Antonio Luna killed? Go back in time and know the history of Antonio Luna here in Crime Klasik.   More on Crime Klasik: https://www.facebook.com/CrimeKlasik     … [Read more...]

Cordillera People’s Flag – Igorot Autonomous Region – Northern Philippines

Cordillera People's Flag (Igorot Autonomous Region)

Cordillera People's Flag - Igorot Autonomous Region - Northern Philippines Explanation of the flag The Cordillera people are 7 interior people native to Cordillera mountains which stretch from North Borneo all the way to Luzon Island. The flag has 8 lances: 7 which represent the 7 interior people and 1 which represents the Tagalog people. The flag is also used with the letters CPDF in black under the emblem when it is used as the flag of the Cordillera People's Democratic Front. … [Read more...]

Documentary: Itinaga sa Bato – Baybayin Documentary written by Howie Severino and directed by Cris Sto. Domingo

Itinaga sa Bato baybayin

Documentary: Itinaga sa Bato - Baybayin Documentary written by Howie Severino and directed by Cris Sto. Domingo   http://youtu.be/nk2SF81q7kY Part 1   http://youtu.be/HWmFhBlJLko Part 2   http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/227829/publicaffairs/iwitness/itinaga-sa-bato-documentary-by-howie-severino http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2010078/ Many Filipinos are in the dark about their pre-colonial past, or Philippine history before the Spaniards came. That past is coming to light with Amaya, the first prime-time teleserye about Philippine society and culture before Europeans knew these existed. But even that history is based on what Spanish chroniclers wrote about the islanders they called indios. A recently discovered stone may change all that. A doormat for many years outside a Masbate classroom, the stone slab was cleaned by school children, revealing beneath the hardened mud writing in the ancient Filipino script called baybayin. Is it really a window into our pre-colonial past, or simply the work of a more recent hobbyist? Howie Severino and his documentary team accompany scientists to Ticao Island in Masbate as they try to authenticate the stone's origins and unlock its secrets. What does the writing say? Their investigation leads Howie's team's to living baybayin writers in Manila trying to keep the ancient script alive, convinced that it is an essential element in Filipinos' modern identity and a way for them to stand tall in a globalizing world where many languages, and the cultures they represent, are vanishing.       … [Read more...]

Respecting the Grand Masters of the Warrior Arts in the Philippines by Jay Ignacio

kali, arnis, eskrima, escrima, www.mandirigma.org, www.backyardeskrima.com, kali, arnis, eskrima, escrima, www.mandirigma.org, www.backyardeskrima.com

Respecting the Grand Masters of the Warrior Arts in the Philippines   by Jay Ignacio   Those who have seen The Bladed Hand would have understood that a lot of the Grand Masters in the Philippines are not well-off. They live in very tough conditions, some are employed for a paltry sum, and there are others who have no source of income other than when they have students to teach.Please be understanding when you approach them and do not ask for discounted rates, or take advantage of them by giving them empty promises of compensation or trips abroad.FMA may give some folks abroad a decent income, or even "street cred", but here in the Philippines, these Masters do not own gyms or schools or training facilities. They teach in public parks, or give private lessons at the students' homes.Pay them on time whatever rate you agreed on per session, and have the decency to acknowledge them for what they taught you. Pay, or at the very least, offer to pay them for their cab, or bus, or jeepney ride to meet up with you. Feed them as well, especially if ask to meet at a cafe or restaurant. Be mindful of the fact that photo ops with the Masters sometimes have consequences not favorable to them. Note that when you bug them to give you a certificate (when they normally don't because they have no registered business for their FMA system) for just a few days or hours of training, you are taking something away from them. There's just too much of this going around. A lot of them complain, but there is no avenue for them to adress any of their concerns. Sometimes they give in because they have no choice. It's a matter of understanding, and of respecting their intellectual property, among other things.   http://youtu.be/2LK2SNOWqdI … [Read more...]

Laban Laro – Invitation Only Sparring, June 22nd. Aranda/Ricketts Memorial Gym

Final Laban, GM Ricketts, PG Sulite, Guro Brandon Ricketts, Guro Dino Flores, Guro Bud Balani, Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, Ilustrisimo, Lameco, Bakbakan Philippines, Kali, Kalis, Arnis, Eskrima, Escrima,

Laban Laro - Invitation Only Sparring, June 22nd. Aranda/Ricketts Memorial Gym An Event Honoring the Sparring Tradition Founded by the Five Pillars of Ilustrisimo and the Original Bakbakan Philippines. Participating Organizations: Bakbakan Philippines - USA HQ,  Ilustrisimo USA, Lameco SOG, Kapisanang Mandirigma. Event Supervised by: Guro Brandon Ricketts, Guro Bud Balani, Guro Ariel Flores Mosses,  Guro Dino Flores.   … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma presents an Introductory Course in Backyard Lameco Eskrima. JULY 14th till AUGUST 17th, 2013, Los Angeles, California.

http://mandirigma.org/, http://backyardeskrima.com/, dino flores, guro dino flores, kali, kalis, arnis, eskrima, escrima, fma, lameco, ilustrisimo, sulite, ricketts, luzon, visayas, mindanao, kampilan, balisong, kris, rattan

Kapisanang Mandirigma presents an  Introductory Course in Backyard Lameco Eskrima.                                                                                     JULY 14th until AUGUST 17th, 2013, Los Angeles, California. This course will introduce you to the the Foundations and Combat Applications of Lameco Eskrima, the Philippine Warrior Art System founded by Punong Guro Edgar Sulite. Class will focus on core Lameco “Eskrima Drills” and “Kali Drills”. Classes will be conducted primarily by Guro Dino Flores. Classes will be kept small in order to ensure quality instruction.
This is a very rare opportunity. These classes are only held when time permits. This course also serves as a prerequisite to any future classes that are only open to members and individuals that have completed this course. For further course details go to: http://backyardeskrima.com and email us directly from the “Contact” page. Please give us a little background on yourself when requesting information. Maraming Salamat. … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma Spain

Spain Eskrima School kali arnis escrima kalis fma ilustrisimo lameco ricketts sulite

Kapisanang Mandirigma Spain Representative Tim B. Fredianelli is the Kapisanang Mandirigma Spain Representative. He is in the process of obtaining his Level One Trainer Credentials. He can be contacted at: tim.fredianelli@facebook.com +++++++++++++++++++ About Tim B. Fredianelli: Tim B. Fredianelli is Assistant Instructor iin Jeet Kune Do under Sifu Tim Tackett and Sifu Bob Bremmer, Certified Knife Expert under Hock Hocheim, 2ºdan Black Belt in Kick Boxing, was a senior member of the Instituto de Kali Jun Fan in Madrid for 11 years training in Inosanto Kali and Muay Thai, and Wing Chung, Jun Fan and Jeet Kune Do. Has more than 25 years of experience in martial arts. Was the first to train and promote Lameco and Kalis Ilustrisimo in Spain, and has been promoting and training Lameco and Kalis Ilustrisimo since 2003. He now trains a small group of dedicated students in all these arts. http://www.kali-jeetkunedo.com/7instructor.html   … [Read more...]

Imprinting Andres Bonifacio: The Iconization from Portrait to Peso by The Malacañan Palace Library

Andres_Bonifacio_photo

Imprinting Andres Bonifacio: The Iconization from Portrait to Peso by The Malacañan Palace Library   The face of the Philippine revolution is evasive, just like the freedom that eluded the man known as its leader.   The only known photograph of Andres Bonifacio is housed in the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, Spain. Some say that it was taken during his second wedding to Gregoria de Jesus in Katipunan ceremonial rites. It is dated 1896 from Chofre y Cia (precursor to today’s Cacho Hermanos printing firm), a prominent printing press and pioneer of lithographic printing in the country, based in Manila. The faded photograph, instead of being a precise representation of a specific historical figure, instead becomes a kind of Rorschach test, liable to conflicting impressions. Does the picture show the President of the Supreme Council of the Katipunan as a bourgeois everyman with nondescript, almost forgettable features? Or does it portray a dour piercing glare perpetually frozen in time, revealing a determined leader deep in contemplation, whose mind is clouded with thoughts of waging an armed struggle against a colonial power? Perhaps a less subjective and more fruitful avenue for investigation is to compare and contrast this earliest documented image with those that have referred to it, or even paid a curious homage to it, by substantially altering his faded features. This undated image of Bonifacio offers the closest resemblance to the Chofre y Cia version. As attested to by National Scientist Teodoro A. Agoncillo and the National Historical Commission of the Philippines, it is the image that depicts the well-known attribution of Bonifacio being of sangley (or Chinese) descent. While nearly identical in composition with the original, this second image shows him with a refined–even weak–chin, almond-shaped eyes, a less defined brow, and even modified hair. The blurring of his features, perhaps the result of the image being timeworn, offers little room for interjection. In contrast, the next image dating from a February 8, 1897 issue of La Ilustración Española y Americana, a Spanish-American weekly publication, features a heavily altered representation of Bonifacio at odds with the earlier depiction from Chofre y Cia. This modification catered to the Castilian idea of racial superiority, and to the waning Spanish Empire’s shock–perhaps even awe?–over what they must have viewed at the time as indio impudence. Hence the Bonifacio in this engraving is given a more pronounced set of features–a more prominent, almost ruthless jawline, deep-set eyes, a heavy, furrowed brow and a proud yet incongruously vacant stare. Far from the unassuming demeanor previously evidenced, there is an aura of unshakable, even obstinate, determination surrounding the revolutionary leader who remained resolute until his last breath. Notice also that for the first (although it would not be the last) time, he is formally clad in what appears to be a three-piece suit with a white bowtie–hardly the dress one would expect, given his allegedly humble beginnings. Given its printing, this is arguably the first depiction of Bonifacio to be circulated en masse. The same image appeared in Ramon Reyes Lala’s The Philippine Islands, which was published in 1899 by an American publishing house for distribution in the Philippines. The records of both the Filipinas Heritage Library and the Lopez Museum reveal a third, separate image of Bonifacio which appears in the December 7, 1910 issue of El Renacimiento Filipino, a Filipino publication during the early years of the American occupation. El Renacimiento Filipino portrays an idealized Bonifacio, taking even greater liberties with the Chofre y Cia portrait. There is both gentrification and romanticization at work here. His receding hairline draws attention to his wide forehead–pointing to cultural assumptions of the time that a broad brow denotes a powerful intellect–and his full lips are almost pouting. His cheekbones are more prominent and his eyes are given a curious, lidded, dreamy, even feminine emphasis, imbuing him with an air of otherworldly reserve–he appears unruffled and somber, almost languid: more poet than firebrand. It is difficult to imagine him as the Bonifacio admired, even idolized, by his countrymen for stirring battle cries and bold military tactics. He is clothed in a similar fashion to the La Ilustración Española y Americana portrait: with a significant deviation that would leave a telltale mark on succeeded images derived from this one. Gone is the white tie (itself an artistic assumption when the original image merely hinted at the possibility of some sort of neckwear), and in its stead, there is a sober black cravat and even a corsage on the buttonhole of his coat. Here the transformation of photograph to engraving takes … [Read more...]

Origin of the Symbols of the Philippine National Flag by The Malacañan Palace Library

pinoy flag

Origin of the Symbols of the Philippine National Flag by The Malacañan Palace Library Aside from the Masonic influence on the Katipunan, the design of the Philippine flag has roots in the flag family to which it belongs—that of the last group of colonies that sought independence from the Spanish Empire at the close of the 19th century, a group to which the Philippines belongs. The Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office traces the origins of the Philippine flag’s design elements, which have been in use since General Emilio Aguinaldo first conceived them—the stars and stripes; the red, white, and blue; the masonic triangle; and the sun—and have endured since. Source: http://malacanang.gov.ph/3846-origin-of-the-symbols-of-our-national-flag/     … [Read more...]

The FMA Informative publishes Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and Master Christopher Ricketts Memorial Seminar Special Issue, March 2013

The FMA Informative publishes Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and Master Christopher Ricketts Memorial Seminar Special Issue, March 2013 kali arnis eskrima kalis

The FMA Informative publishes Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and Master Christopher Ricketts Memorial Seminar Special Issue, March 2013 The FMA Informative was very lucky to be able through the cooperation of Guro Dino Flores to be able to bring just a hint of the knowledge that was put forth and the skills that were demonstrated on March 16 and 17, 2013. At the Lameco S.O.G and Kali Ilustrisimo Memorial Seminar the instructors were the dedicated instructors of Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and Master Christopher Ricketts. They were: Guro Dino Flores, Guro Bud Balani, Guro David Gould, Guro Bong Hebia, Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, and the son of Master Christopher Ricketts Guro Brandon Ricketts. First you will read about the participant Dr. Bryan Stoops reflections on his experience in the 12 Week Backyard Lameco Eskrima course and the 2 day Lameco S.O.G and Ilustrisimo Eskrima Seminar. Then on another aspect Guro David Gould his thoughts on the 2nd Lameco Eskrima “SOG” Memorial Seminar held in Los Angeles, California. Visit www.fmainformative.info and download a copy. Download a copy - www.fmainformative.info/Informative_Issues/2013/FMA_Informative-Issue68.pdf   … [Read more...]

Filipino American Museum of Culture & History Presents – THE INOSANTO STORY. JUNE 1, 2013. Los Angeles

Guro Dan Inosanto Story JKD Kali Arnis Eskrima

Filipino American Museum of Culture & History Presents - THE INOSANTO STORY. JUNE 1, 2013. Los Angeles FMA Enthusiasts! Here's a fund-raising event that not only showcases our pride in Filipino culture and history but also helps to build handicap access for the Filipino Disciples Christian Church. Dress:  Business casual R.S.V.P. by phone or email A.S.A.P followed up by payment.  Last year they had to turn people away because there wasn't enough room or food for them.  The absolute latest they can receive payment and an R.S.V.P. is May 22nd.  If anyone is interested in putting together a display table for their FMA, etc. they can contact Lorna (see below for contact info). To R.S.V.P., call or email: Lorna Dumapias (213) 379-6456 lorna.dumapias7@gmail.com Checks or money orders should be made payable to: Filipino American Museum of Culture & History And checks / money orders can be sent to: Lorna Dumaplas P.O. Box 71372, Los Angeles, CA. 90071 Here's more info about the event: Other highlights of this special event: Guru Dan mentions a historical footnote in his promotion of traditional Filipino martial arts - kali and escrima:  that the art was mainly perpetuated through dance -- while plotting a revolution against 300 years rule by Spain. A traditional Filipino folk-dance will be performed during the Filipino meal--you will recognize some of the foot, hand and arm movements! Demonstration of kali and escrima will follow the folk-dance on stage. Our social hall  has a permanent History Photo Gallery which features Guru Dan's mother and father, as well as Guru Dan. (Guru Dan taught Sunday School to our church's college-age group in the 1960's which is his affiliation with our church--to date, the only Historic-Cultural monument/landmark of Filipino- American origin proclaimed by the City of Los Angeles. In addition, a special photo exhibit about the Inosanto family will be on display. There will also be a table displaying information/activities about the Inosanto Academy and Guru Dan's coming seminars, etc, as well as about the schedule of classes, activities and coming seminars, etc. of Diana Lee Inosanto and Ron Balicki. Because both Guru Dan and his daughter Diana Lee, have always been supportive of preserving and promoting traditional Filipino martial arts as well as other disciplines such as JKD, etc. we invite the martial arts community to participate.  We offer the following: Your group's tax-deductible donation of five tickets at $20 each (could be aggregate of individual check or money order payments) = leader's name with group/studio name listed on printed program as a "Friend of the Museum".  Reservations/payment(s) may be sent payable to the Filipino American Museum of Culture & History and mail to Lorna Dumapias, P.O. Box 71372, Los Angeles, CA. 90071. Ten tickets = listing on printed program and on press releases slated for distribution May 15, and inclusion in a display table(s) promoting martial arts community, where you can promote your specific programs/studio.  (We reserve the right to select final display -- no weapons or inappropriate content allowed.  No actual selling.) Our book titled "Filipino-American Experience: the Making of a Historic-Cultural Monument", a coffee table publication in glossy, landscape style format which includes the Inosanto Story written by Guru Dan's niece, Dr. Celeste Howe, be will be offered at a discount to the martial arts community, seniors and students with school ID. Because we  must know actual number of attendees as soon as possible for seating arrangements due to limited room capacity as well as to help us confirm our order with the restaurant catering the meal, we would appreciate your prompt response. Thanks for your participation!  We hope to see you soon! Best, Lorna Dumapias, Volunteer Curator/Director Filipino American Museum of Culture & History 213/379-6456 … [Read more...]

Pre-Standardized Philippine Flag by Ambeth R. Ocampo

Philippine Revolution Sun

Before the Philippine flag was standardized into the form we know today, the sun had a human face and eight rays that differed depending on who made it. The sun in the flag also appeared as: seals, stamps, and logos on official communications. I'm not sure if this is a stamp for postage, revenue, or documentary tax. Ambeth R. Ocampo … [Read more...]

Protected: Member Equipment List

matibay

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Guro Dave Gould Lameco Seminar. Cuernavaca, Mexico. February 16th & 17th, 2013

Guro Dave Gould Lameco Seminar. Cuernavaca, Mexico. February 16th & 17th, 2013

Guro Dave Gould Lameco Seminar. Cuernavaca, Mexico. February 16th & 17th, 2013 For More Information: combatacademy.central@gmail.com Eduardo Herrera 777 254 58 35   … [Read more...]

Guro John Jacobo Kali Ilustrisimo Seminar. Humble, Texas. February 18th & 19th, 2012.

kali ilustrisimo seminar kali arnis escrima eskrima kali ilustrisimo seminar kali arnis escrima eskrima

Guro John Jacobo Kali Ilustrisimo Seminar. Humble, Texas. February 18th & 19th, 2013. For more information: http://www.swacom.com/   … [Read more...]

Am 15.05.2013 war es soweit. Der philippinische Kampfkunstmeister Dino Flores aus den USA

Guro Dino Flores

http://judo-club-limburg.de/kampfkunst-highlieght-in-limburg.html \ Kampfkunst Highlight in Limburg Am 15.05.2013 war es soweit. Der philippinische Kampfkunstmeister Dino Flores aus den USA besuchte die Modern-Arnis Gruppe des Judo Club Limburg, um seine Spezialitäten - Kalis ilustrisimo und Lameco Eskrima vorzustellen. Sowohl Kalis ilustrisimo als auch Lameco Eskrima sind Kampfkünste, die in Deutschland nur schwer zu finden sind. Dementsprechend groß war die Vorfreude auf das Seminar. Guro Dino Flores verstand es, die Teilnehmer mit seinen kurzen und schnellen Schwerttechniken sowie seiner Präzision zu beeindrucken. Wir freuen uns auf einen weiteren Besuch von Guro Dino Flores in Limburg, vielleicht im nächsten Jahr. Externe Teilnehmer sind zu den Seminaren des Judo Club Limburg immer recht herzlich eingeladen. Das Modern Arnis Training findet jeweils mittwochs von 20 Uhr - 22 Uhr in der Heinz-Wolf-Halle in Limburg statt und ist für Frauen und Männer ab 16 Jahren gleichermaßen geeignet. Eine neue Anfängergruppe startet ab sofort. Interessenten sind hierzu herzlich eingeladen. … [Read more...]

Boxer Codex Manuscript – circa 1595

Tagalog royalty mandirigma.org

Boxer Codex Boxer Codex is a manuscript written circa 1595 which contains illustrations of Filipinos at the time of their initial contact with the Spanish. Aside from a description of and historical allusions to the Philippines and various other Far Eastern countries, it also contains seventy-five colored drawings of the inhabitants of these regions and their distinctive costumes. Fifteen illustrations deal with Filipinos. [1] It is believed that the original owner of the manuscript was Luis Pérez das Mariñas, son of Governor General Gómez Pérez das Mariñas, who was killed in 1593 by the Sangleys (Chinese living in the Philippines). Luis succeeded his father in office as Governor General of the Philippines. Since Spanish colonial governors were required to supply written reports on the territotries they governed, it is likely that the manuscript was written under the orders of the governor. [2] The manuscript's earliest known owner was Lord Ilchester. The codex was among what remained in his collection when his estate, Holland House in London, suffered a direct hit during an air raid 1942. The manuscript was auctioned in 1947 and came into the possession of Prof. Charles R. Boxer, an authority on the Far East. It is now owned by the Lilly Library at Indiana University. [3] The Boxer Codex depicts the Tagalogs, Visayans, Zambals, Cagayanons and Negritos of the Philippines in vivid colors. Except for the Chinese, however, its illustrations of inhabitants of neighboring countries are odd looking. This suggests that the artist did not actually visit the places mentioned from the text, but drew from imagination. Boxer notes that the descriptions of these countries are not original. The account of China, for example, was largely based on the narrative of Fray Martin de Rada. The technique of the paintings suggests that artist may have been Chinese, as does the use of Chinese paper, ink and paints. [4]   Native Pre-colonial inhabitants of the Philippines   Tagalog royalty and his wife, wearing the distinctive color of his class (red).   Tagalog maginoo (noble) and his wife, wearing the distinctive color of his class (blue.   A timawa or tumao (noble) couple, Visayan Pintados   Visayan kadatuan (royal) couple . References ^ Alfredo R. Roces, et. al., eds., Boxer Codex in Filipino Heritage: the Making of a Nation, Philippines: Lahing Pilipino Publishing, Inc., 1977, Vol. IV, p. 1003. ^ Ibid., p. 1004. ^ Ibid., p. 1003. ^ Ibid.     … [Read more...]

THE SIGLO DE ORO – The Golden Age of Spain in the fields of Military and Naval power, international politics, economy, arts, literature, and music. 15th – 17th Centuries.

The Siglo de Oro-mandirigma.org

THE SIGLO DE ORO The Siglo de Oro is the Golden Age of Spain in the fields of Military and Naval power, international politics, economy, arts, literature, and music. The actual length of Spain's golden age lasted for more than a hundred years, from 15th to the 17th Centuries. The above photo shows the areas of the world that at one time were territories of the Spanish Monarchy or Empire. The Spanish empire reached its greatest extent during the Siglo de Oro. … [Read more...]

The Combat Academy presents a Kapisanang Mandirigma Seminar with Guro Dino Flores in Cuernavaca City, Mexico, October 6 & 7, 2012

KAPISANANG-MANDIRIGMA-MEXICO-lameco-ilustrisimo-ricketts-sulite-kali-arnis-eskrima-philippines-KAPISANANG-MANDIRIGMA-MEXICO-lameco-ilustrisimo-ricketts-sulite-kali-arnis-eskrima-philippines

  The Combat Academy presents a Kapisanang Mandirigma Seminar with Guro Dino Flores in Cuernavaca City, Mexico, October 6 & 7, 2012. Guro Dino Flores will be sharing some of his experience in Ilustrisimo and Backyard Lameco Eskrima. For more information contact Alex Garduño at the Combat Academy.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino began informally training in the Philippines with family and  family friends in balisong for the streets. Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Master Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego. Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. About The Combat Academy: The “Combat Academy” was born in February of 2012 as an Independent training center after 17 years of work and continuous training. The Combat Academy curriculum includes Filipino Martial Arts (Lameco Eskrima & Doce Pares Eskrima), Muay Thai/Boxing, Sambo/ Jiu Jitsu, JKD and AMOK! Alex Garduño, Director and chief Instructor of the “Combat Academy”, is a Lameco Eskrima student under Guro Dave Gould and Guro Roger Agbulos, holds the Guro Rank in Doce Pares Eskrima under SGM Cacoy Cañete and He´s student of Tom Sotis in AMOK! … [Read more...]

Through sponsorship by Senator Miguel Zubiri – Arnis Officially Declared National Martial Art and Sport, Dec. 11 2009,

Lameco Sulite-advanced-balisong www.mandirigma.org

UPDATE ON LAWS PASSED DURING THE 14th & 15th CONGRESS Researched by the Executive-Legislative Liaison Service LAWS OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE (15th CONGRESS)   RA 9850 AN ACT DECLARING ARNIS AS THE NATIONAL MARTIAL ART AND SPORT OF THE PHILIPPINES (SIGNED INTO LAW ON DECEMBER 11,  2009)   **********   The principal author and sponsor of RA 9850 is Senator Juan Miguel “Migz” F. Zubiri. He is a dedicated Martial Artist and Eskrimador. His primary teacher since childhood is Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts, founder of Bakbakan Philippines. System that he studied under Grandmaster Ricketts include Bakbakan Sagasa Kickboxing, Ngo Cho Kung Fu and Kali Ilustrisimo. Other teachers include Bakbakan Members Grandmaster Alex Co (Ngo Cho), Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite (Lameco Eskrima), Grandmaster Tony Diego (Kali Ilustrisimo) and Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo himself.   Miguel with some of his teachers and fellow Bakbakan members.   On the cover of the "Advanced Balisong" book with one of his teachers, Punong Guro Edgar Sulite. Senator Juan Miguel F. Zubiri In 2008, Senator Juan Miguel “Migz” F. Zubiri, at age 39, became the youngest to be elected as Senate Majority Leader since the First Congress in 1946. A veteran legislator, he served the 3rd District of Bukidnon from 1998 to 2007 and was always cited as one of the most outstanding solons in the House of Representatives. He has also maintained a perfect attendance in the Plenary Sessions for the last 12 years (4 Congresses) both as Congressman and as Senator, and including this 15th Congress. In the 14th Congress and during his stint as Senate Majority Leader, Sen. Zubiri helped steer the Senate to a record performance of around 650 bills enacted into laws. Sen. Migz is the principal author and sponsor of more than 20 major laws, both in the Senate and during his stint as Congressman. As a fervent advocate of clean energy, he worked for the passage of RA 9513 or the Renewable Energy Act of 2008 and RA 9367 or the Biofuels Act of 2006, earning him the moniker Mr. Clean Energy. Among the other laws he sponsored, principally authored or co-authored are:   RA10068 – Organic Agriculture Act of 2010; RA 9147 – Wildlife Conservation and Protection Act; RA 10121 – Philippine Disaster Risk Management Act; RA 9165 – Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002; RA 9679 – the Home Development Mutual Fund Law of 2009 (Pag-IBIG Fund); RA 9653 – the Rent Control Act of 2009; RA 9997 – the National Commission on Muslim Filipinos Act of 2009; RA 9996 – the Mindanao Development Authority Act of 2010; RA 9904 – the Magna Carta for Homeowners and Homeowners’ Associations; RA 9903 – Condonation of Penalties on Delinquent Social Security Contributions; RA 9507 – the Socialized and Low-Cost Housing Loan Condonation Program; RA 9850 – Declaring Arnis as the National Martial Art and Sport; RA 9500 – UP Charter Amendments; RA 9163 – National Service Training Program; RA 9166 – Armed Forces of the Philippines Rate Pay Base Increase Act; RA 10072 – the New Charter of the Philippine Red Cross; RA 9645 – Declaring July 27 of Every Year as Araw ng Iglesia Ni Cristo and as Special Working Holiday; and RA 9849 – Declaring Eidul Adha as a National Holiday. He is also considered the “father” of the New Cooperative Code being the principal sponsor and author of RA 9520 or the Philippine Cooperative Code of 2008. Sen. Migz is known as a champion of environmental concerns, an advocacy he pursues in the Senate and among his top legislative agenda. In the current 15th Congress, he chairs the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. He also chairs the Committee on Cooperatives and 3 Joint Congressional Oversight Committees such as the Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act; Joint Congressional Committee on Clean Air Act; and the Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on Cooperatives. He is also a member of 20 other Senate standing committees. Sen. Migz is involved in concrete environmental programs such as being the founder of the Philippine Deer Foundation, a deer conservation project, and as President of the Palawan-based Katala Foundation which protects endangered wildlife species and their habitats. A trained first aider and certified rescue diver, he is a Governor of the Philippine Red Cross and active member of the Red Cross Youth Committee and Concerned Divers of the Philippines. Senator Zubiri has published two books: the Philippine Cooperative Code of 2008, and Bukidnon: The Philippine Frontier. He is a graduate of Master’s in Environment and Natural Resources Management at the University of the Philippines Open University and Bachelor of Science in Agri-Business Management at the University of the Philippines in Los Baños. He has also … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine article for Budo International, November 2011

dvd-lameco-eskrima-backyard-sulite-original-group www.mandirigma.org

Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine article for Budo International, November 2011 February 1, 2012 By dinof2 Leave a Comment (Edit) Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine  article for Budo International, November 2011     Excerpt from the DVD backcover: Punong Guro Edgar Sulite was one of the great revolutionaries in Philippine Martial Arts history. There were two types of students that learnt under him, those who took classes under him periodically and those whom he selected and prepared personally for becoming fighters in private training sessions in the backyard of his home, these students belonged to the Sulite Orihinal Group. Dino Flores belongs to this second elite group of specially trained fighters in Lameco and shines with his own light as one of the top selected fighters of the Lameco Eskrima backyard group. In this work he introduces and shows us a series of exercises which Punong Guro Sulite emphasized greatly upon and that develop correct distancing in a real combat situation. This dvd will help you refine the combative motions, enable you to increase the intensity within a drill, as well as show you how to use equipment correctly and help you overcome a well protected opponent. You will learn how to avoid being hit and grabbed. These exercises practiced under real contact and tension will allow you to react against the most common attacks in real time and in an effective way. The most important thing is to hit well, to have good footwork and mainly to have a great foundation. http://www.budointernational.net/arnis-kali-escrima/1564-dvd-lameco-eskrima-backyard-sulite-original-group.html     About Budo International Magazine Budo International is the only martial arts magazine published in seven different languages (English, Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, and Croatian) and sold worldwide. Budo Magazine is undisputedly the largest specialized magazine in over 60 countries. They are the foremost martial arts publication in Europe, South America, Central America and Australia, as well as having editions in Greece and Czechoslovakia.Their monthly publication brings exciting and exotic masters and material that is truly universal. Budo also covers all types of events, from tournaments to movies and the magazine brings a gust of fresh air mixed with European quality to the American culture. Click on the magazine image below to read English issues of Budo. http://www.budointernational.net/   http://youtu.be/_F-WsyfWAhs   Backyard Lameco DVD clip produced by Budo International … [Read more...]

Master Joe Tan of Tapado/Vinas Eskrima to appear at Magda Institute Camp in California, July 4th – 7th, 2013

Master Joe Tan Seminar Kali Arnis Eskrima Vinas Tapado

Master Joe Tan of Tapado/Vinas Eskrima to appear at Magda Institute Camp, July 4th - 7th, 2013   … [Read more...]

Guro Balinado of Balinado Arnis-Kursada & Guro Roger Agbulos of Lameco Astig Combatives teamed up to showcase FMA self-defense and combatives at the FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS SUMMERCAMP IN GERMANY 2013

astig lameco

Guro Balinado of Balinado Arnis-Kursada & Guro Roger Agbulos of Lameco Astig Combatives teamed up to showcase FMA self-defense and combatives at the FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS SUMMERCAMP 2013. https://www.facebook.com/events/358303297612020/   … [Read more...]

Protected: Invitation Only, Private Ilustrisimo Seminar – NEW DATES – Los Angeles & Las Vegas

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The FMA Informative has a Newspaper with information for the Filipino martial arts community, short stories, introductions of practitioners or styles, theories and/or technical aspects, short write ups on a past event etc, pertinent to the Filipino martial arts and the culture of the Philippine.

http://www.fmainformative.info/ http://www.fmainformative.info/

  The FMA Informative has a Newspaper with information for the Filipino martial arts community, short stories, introductions of practitioners or styles, theories and/or technical aspects, short write ups on a past event etc, pertinent to the Filipino martial arts and the culture of the Philippine. The FMA Informative also has an Online Magazine which each issue is dedicated to a subject such as certain aspects of a style, historical, theoretical and technical aspects, reflections, and other related subjects, also the culture of the Philippines etc... Both can be subscribed to for Free. The ideas and opinions expressed in the FMA Informative newspaper or online magazine are those of the authors of the articles or practitioners being interviewed and are not necessarily the views of the FMA Informative.   For more information go to their website: http://www.fmainformative.info/   Join FMA Informative on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/FMA-Informative/205930022842825 … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan Sendong Flood Victims Benefit Seminar, April 29th, 2012

master nene gaabucayan nng balintawak arnis eskrima master nene gaabucayan nng balintawak arnis eskrima

  About Grandmaster Nonato "Nene" Gaabucayan "Standing at 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighting no more that 120 pounds, Venancio "Anciong" Bacon was a very unassuming man. He was a veteran of a great many "death" matches in Cebu. Described by many of his students as lightning fast, Venancio Bacon maneuvered through a fight smoothly while exploiting his opponents’ balance and coordination. He was known to be very surgical with a stick, able to employ varying force to his exact targets throughout his adversary’s body. But, his greatest virtue and asset was his constant desire to innovate and improve his art, diligently discovering techniques through the years, never ceasing in this path. He taught his art to those who desired to learn it." At age 16, Nonato "Nene" Gaabucayan was introduced to Venancio "Anciong" Bacon's BALINTAWAK. In early 1976, "Nene" Gaabucayan moved to Cebu City from Cagayan de Oro to attend college. He lived in a boarding house owned by "Ben" Marapao in Urgello area. Upon learning that Nene was interested in continuing his Karate training, Dr. Marapao suggested he take up Eskrima. Nene attended one training session, in which he was given a demonstration by Teofilo Velez. He'd never seen anything like it, since then he had always been a loyal student and teacher of BALINTAWAK. Along with Teofilo Velez, Nene trained with Bobby Taboada, Chito Velez, Monnie Velez, Eddie Velez, Romeo de la Rosa, and Hector Rizzari. Training was hard, and he made a point to be there every day. Like a sponge, everybody poured whatever Balintawak knowledge they had to this very eager 16 year old. In return, he learned from them. At 18, Nene began teaching his own crop of students in Lapu-Lapu City. He divided his time between his studies at the Philippine Air Force College of Aeronautics and the YMCA in Lapu-Lapu. The photo below are some of his students, from left to right is Nonoy Patalinghug, Boy Booc (judo instructor), Nene, Dr. Marapao, Tonying Patalinghug, Fred Baguio, seated wearing a gi is Boy Baguio (karate instructor), seated wearing a jean jacket is Conrado "Condring" Ybanez (nephew of Tinong Ybanez). After completing his studies in Cebu, Nene returned to Cagayan de Oro. As one of Teofilo Velez' master instructors, he carried the Gold Chapter of Teovel Balintawak. He continued to teach Balintawak. In 1987, Nene traveled to Germany and later to Switzerland to teach BALINTAWAK. He stayed in Europe for 3 years, then returned to Cagayan de Oro. Nene has been teaching BALINTAWAK for 35 years.   For more information: http://www.nngbalintawak.com/index.html http://www.facebook.com/events/119784368151790/?notif_t=plan_edited … [Read more...]

The Origins of Philippines Boxing, 1899-1929

Pancho Villa by Ed Hughes1925 filipino boxing Pancho Villa by Ed Hughes1925 filipino boxing

The Origins of Philippines Boxing, 1899-1929   By Joseph R. Svinth Copyright © Joseph R. Svinth 2001. All rights reserved. The assistance of Pat Baptiste, Hank Kaplan, Paul Lou, Eric Madis, Curtis Narimatsu, John Ochs,  Michael Machado, and Kevin Smith is gratefully acknowledged. On June 18, 1923, Francisco "Pancho Villa" Guilledo beat Jimmy Wilde to become the world flyweight boxing champion, an accomplishment that was (and remains) a matter of great pride to people of Filipino descent. Unfortunately, while there has been some documentation of the many excellent Filipino boxers who subsequently followed Guilledo to the United States, there has not been as much attention paid to documenting the origins of boxing in the Philippines. This article represents a step toward correcting that omission. People with additional information or corrections are invited to contact the author at jsvinth@ejmas.com. "Pancho Villa, gone but not forgotten." Illustration by Ed Hughes, 1925. Boxing Enters the Philippines US servicemen introduced boxing to the Philippines during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. How this came about is that on April 25, 1898, the United States declared war on Spain, whose colonial holdings included the Philippines. So, on April 27, 1898, Commodore George Dewey ordered his squadron of five cruisers and two gunboats to steam from China to the Philippines, and there, on May 1, 1898, he issued the famous command, "You may fire when ready, Gridley." The resulting US naval victory effectively ended Spanish control of the region, and in August 1898 the US Army began the occupation of Luzon. Then, to the horror of the Filipinos, the Americans did not cede the Philippines to them: instead they decided to keep the islands for themselves. Between 1899 and 1913, this resulted in savage wars of peace whose heroes included Emilio Aguinaldo on one side and Arthur MacArthur, Frederick Funston, Leonard Wood, and John J. Pershing on the other. Casualties in these battles were heavy and one-sided: US casualties were listed as 4,243 killed and 2,818 wounded in action while Filipino casualties are estimated at 16,000 killed, plus another several hundred thousand dead from famine or disease (generally cholera). However, after Theodore Roosevelt’s unilateral declaration of victory in July 1902, US commanders began thinking about how to reduce the rates of desertion, suicide, sexually transmitted diseases, drug abuse, and drunkenness among their soldiers and sailors. Boxing was offered as a potential solution. The reason was that boxers in training were taught to avoid tobacco, alcohol, and sexual activity. Furthermore, explained writer Charles L. Clay in 1887, "Boxing also makes a man self-reliant and resourceful when assailed by sudden or unexpected dangers or difficulties." This, in turn, said a YMCA director named C.H. Jackson in 1909, made young men "Christlike and manly." So, in 1902, Major Elijah Halford (a former secretary to President Benjamin Harrison) asked philanthropists for $200,000 to construct a YMCA in Manila, and by 1904, Army officers such as Edmund Butts were extolling the virtues of boxing in tropical environments such as Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. US Military Boxers On November 18, 1899, soldiers of the 11th US Cavalry reported finding a pair of boxing gloves made by Sol Levinson of San Francisco abandoned in the Luzon village of San Mateo. According to Damon Runyon, writing in October 1925, Filipino prisoners reported that the "gloves had been brought in by a renegade soldier from the negro Twenty-fourth Infantry, and that he had been schooling the Filipinos in their use." Many early boxers in the Philippines were African American, as the all-black 9th and 10th US Cavalry, 24th and 25th US Infantry, and 48th and 49th US Volunteer Infantry formed a significant percentage of the American soldiers serving in the Philippines between 1899 and 1902. Following Roosevelt’s declaration of peace, most of the black troops were sent back to the United States but in 1913, the 25th was in Hawaii. There the Honolulu Advertiser noted: The Twenty-fifth is proud of its colored ringmasters and particularly of Hollie Giles, a welterweight of 155 pounds, who is described by the men as a ‘whirlwind’ fighter; Morgan, a heavyweight at 190 pounds; Carson, a light heavyweight, and Ananias Harris, a light heavyweight. Meanwhile, from 1913 until 1917, the 24th was in the Philippines, serving at Camp McGrath (Batangas) and Fort Mills (Corregidor). Noted African American fighters from this period included the middleweights Joe Blackburn, "Craps" Johnson, and "Demon" White. Of course, there were also white soldiers who boxed in the Philippines. The most famous was New Jersey’s Mike Ballerino. "Ballerino had a chip on his shoulder," Pancho Villa recalled in early 1925. "He dared any of the Filipinos to knock it off." So Pancho Villa did, … [Read more...]

Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano

Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano Rapid Journal Vol. 2, No. 4 4th Qtr 1997Taichi Works Publications 458 Jaboneros St. Binondo, Manila 1006 Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano The term arnis evokes a number of reactions from people every time it is mentioned in a conversation. Some people start fanning their hands in the air, imitating the distinctive movements of the two-stick (doble baston) training method. This image of arnis is one of the most popular to the layman. A second reaction, and quite as common as the first, is the question: "Saan ba talaga galing ang arnis?" (Where did arnis really come from?) Alternatively, "Di ba, sa atin nanggaling ang arnis?î (Isn't it that arnis comes from us?) is a question also heard. This article is an attempt to critically examine the roots of one of the martial arts of the Philippines, arnis. It must be noted that in no way does this article claim to be the final say on the origins of arnis. It is actually a preliminary look, a start if you will, into re-examining carefully the origins of an art form. Arnis, also known as kali, escrima, baston, etc. is a complete martial art system, encompassing weapons training and empty-hand self-defense. It includes training in single stick techniques (solo baston), double stick techniques (doble baston), stick and knife or dagger techniques (espada y daga) and knife techniques (daga). Some styles may include staff and spear (sibat) training in their curriculum. Others will include the practice of medium to long bladed weapons (bolo) in their repertoire. Many styles have some form of empty hand combat, encompassing striking, kicking, locking, throwing and even choking methods. These are usually taught when the practitioner has demonstrated a reasonable degree of proficiency with the weapons of his style of arnis. Different arnis styles, from different parts of the country, may emphasize different areas of the training methods noted above. The term arnis is believed to be a Tagalog corruption of the Spanish term arnes, or harness, a reference to the decorations worn by the early Filipinos. Kali is another term used to refer to the same kind of martial arts. Different provinces may have different names for arnis, such as baston and kaliradman (Ilonggo, Bisaya), pagkalikali (Ibanag) and kalirongan (Pangasinan). These are only a few examples of the terms already recorded in different sources. With such a comprehensive system of martial arts being taught and promoted in different areas of the country, it is inevitable that people would ask, where did such a complete martial art system come from? One suggestion is that it originally came from another martial art system, called tjakalele. This is actually the name of a branch of the Indonesian martial art system known as pentjak silat. Another suggestion is that it was brought here from the Southeast Asian mainland, particularly during the Madjapahit and Shri-Visayan empires. Yet another suggestion is that it was propagated by the so-called ten Bornean datus fleeing persecution from their homeland. We shall critically examine these assertions one at a time. The idea that arnis evolved or was derived from another martial art system, namely tjakalele silat, is due to linguistics. The alternative name for arnis is kali. It is widely held that this is the older term for arnis, and that kali itself emphasizes bladed weaponry apart from practice with the stick. It is not surprising that a connection could be seen between the term kali and tjakalele. However, linguistic similarity alone is not enough ground to assert that kali was indeed derived from tjakalele. There has to be documented proof that one came from the other. What form should this proof take? Authenticated documents certainly are one of the best pieces of evidence - if such could be found, and proven to be genuine. A close and thorough comparison of both styles would help, but it must be remembered that they would have changed over time, reflecting the different changes that have happened in their cultures of origin. On the other hand, one of the local terms for a bladed weapon is kalis. It is also believed that kali is a derived term from kalis. This assertion will require study before it can be validated. Another oft-quoted idea is that kali was brought here during the Shri-Vishayan (7th -14th centuries and Madjapahit (13th -16th centuries) empires. This reflects the notion that the Philippines then was somehow an integral part of both empires. It must be noted that the archaeological evidence for the role of the Philippines in both empires is very meager. About the best that could be said is that there was commercial contact, but whether such contact also included the spreading of martial arts is circumstantial at best. A third idea regarding the spreading and propagation of kali in the Philippines is that ten Bornean datus (sometimes nine) fled here and settled in various parts of … [Read more...]

The History of Tapado by Master Joe Tan

Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas

History of Tapado Tapado is an Original Filipino Martial Art which came from a Hiligaynon (a Filipino dialect) word ‘Tapat’ or ‘Tapos’ which means – finished or done in english or to finish the job in one strike. This art was founded in 1960 by the late Grandmaster Romeo ‘Nono’ Mamar of Taloc, Bago City, Negros Occidental, Philippines. ‘Nono’ as he was fondly called, was an accomplished stickfighter specializing in lagas, sinamak and oido arnis systems. But despite his proficiencies in these various arts of arnis/kali/escrima, he found them wanting because according to his actual experiences during matches among his peers, he could still be hit by his opponent. As in a boxing match..where even the champion could still be pummeled despite his experiences, training and exposures, Nono didn’t like the idea of taking hits at all. So after experiencing these various hits and a few times, even defeats, he decided to take a break from stickfighting for a couple of years. But due to his undying love of this art, he continued his personal search along the line of other arts in relations to stickfighting. He noticed that a sword with its longer length has an advantage of reach and power. And so this prompted him to experiment with longer sticks of various sizes and length. After his rigid testing and re testing, he finally settled for a longer stick 43 to 47 inches long. The length is based on the height of the person. But then again, he started thinking : what if the opponent has the same size and length of stick.too?. Thru persistent research and self discovery, he came up with the solutions. He developed various unseen hand, wrist, arm, shoulder and body movements, that jibed with the law of Physics, that generated a lot of power to his strikes and always resulted in overpowering all incoming strikes. Not content to just the overpowering strike, Nono wanted to add a simultaneous offensive hit at the same time thereby rendering the opponent incapacitated with just one powerful and speedy blow. And thus the birth of Tapado. Tapado ,in its early inception, was secretly propagated and practiced only by relatives and family members of the clan. There was an early Tapado Association formed in 1980 but it was still limited and exclusive for members of the family , close relatives and associates. In 1983, Tapado was formally organized and introduced to the public. When the founder died on February 15, 2005, the leadership of the original tapado organization was handed down to his nephew GM Benefredo ‘Bebing’ Lobrido . It took on the official name of Original Filipino Tapado Longstick Fighting Association. Inc. Another Tapado group was set up under GM Mike F. Vasquez, the founder of Vasquez Modified Martial Art International. An undefeated heavy weight Karate champion of the Philippines , a Master Arnis practicioner and a top tapado student of Nono Mumar. GM Mike introduced modifications in the tapado system and called it MODIFIED TAPADO. GM Mike had discussed his ideas of modifications with the original founder while he was alive and was given the authority to do so. The author Master Jose Valencia Tan, has the privilege of having studied under both Grandmasters, GM Nono Mumar and GM Mike Vasquez and including GM Lobrido (when the latter was the Chief Instructor of Original Tapado ). The author is recognized and Certified as Master of Tapado by both Organizations. Currently, Master Joe is propagating Tapado in the US and is an authorized Sole representative of Modified Tapado Organization in the State of California. Photos Master Joe Tan w/ GM Jose Vinas (Founder of Lapu Lapu Vinas Arnis Afficionado) JTan in yellow w/black stripe polo shirt. Master Tan w/ GM Nono Mamar (Founder of Original Tapado Arnis Organization) Grandmaster Jose Vinas - Founder of Lapu Lapu Vinas Arnis Afficianado and Teacher of Master Joe Tan in Arnis. Grandmaster Nono Mamar and Grandmaster Mike Vasquez Master Joe Tan w/ GM Bebing Lobrido (Inhiritor of Original Tapado) Master Joe Tan w/ GM Mike Vasquez (Founder of Modified Tapado) Vasquez Modified Martial Arts Copyright © by MasterTapadoArnis.com | Design Copyright © by E. Kelly … [Read more...]

Giving the Right Credits 
By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite

arnis lameco escrima eskrima kali Sulite arnis lameco escrima eskrima kali Sulite

  Giving the Right Credits 
By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite This article was first published in VORTEX (Volume 4, Number 1) in 1995. A quarterly 
newsletter of Lameco Eskrima International, the publisher was the late Punong Guro 
Edgar G. Sulite who passed away on April 10, 1997. The editor was Arnold A. Noche.   Giving the Right Credits By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite   In today’s society, martial arts practitioners are constantly bombarded by the 
knowledge and techniques of various martial arts arriving from all four corners of the 
world. These are the same exact techniques that were once forbidden to be taught outside 
the family circle by the very same people who created it and used it. Those people 
dedicated their lives in the laboratory of the battlefield just to experiment whether their 
techniques would work or not. Many lives had been wasted before the techniques were 
ever refined. The masters from the different martial arts devoted their time, energy and, 
above all, their life in the development of their fierce combat techniques. 
The Filipino martial arts (Eskrima, Kali, Arnis), Kung-Fu, Thai Boxing, Karate, 
Indonesian Silat, Jiu-Jitsu, Western Boxing, Tai-Chi, Judo, Savate and other martial arts 
are just a mere phone call away. In our generation today, we are extremely fortunate to 
have these different types of martial arts available within our grasp. I remember Grandmaster Jose D. Caballero who was my teacher in the De Campo 
Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal System. It took me more than one year to court him, bringing him 
food each day on every visit as a means of a gift, just for him to accept me as a student. It 
was primarily because I was an outsider, one who didn’t belong to their family, that I was 
not accepted right away. It was also because of my perseverance, that I never stopped 
coming to his house to ask him to teach me, that I was finally accepted to become one of 
his disciples. Nowadays, you can study any and all kinds of martial arts as you wish, because 
they are available within your reach, for as long as you have the determination to learn. 
Due to the abundance of these martial arts that we study, we somehow consciously or 
subconsciously mix it together as one. This bring us now to the big problem that evolves 
due to the fact that some martial arts teachers, as well as some students, are not honest 
enough in giving the right credits to where they have gotten the knowledge from or where 
they have attained the techniques from. One afternoon in Manila, Philippines, during our Sunday sessions with 
Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo in Luneta Park, we noticed two bystanders carefully 
observing our training with extremely watchful eyes. I, being one of the spokesmen of the 
Kali Ilustrisimo System, approached the two men and asked them if they knew Eskrima, 
Kali or Arnis. I also asked them if they would show us some of their moves. The 
demonstration that they performed for us was quite impressive. Grandmaster Ilustrisimo, 
who does not impress easily at all especially if you are from another style of Kali, was 
astounded. After their demonstration we asked immediately who their teacher was. One 
of the young men replied that they did not have a teacher that they just went to the 
mountains and meditated to formulate the techniques, which they had just performed. We did not believe him nor them. Master Tony Diego said to me that it was such a pity to 
their teacher, whoever it was, that these two men would turn out to be so disrespectful. 
Less than a year later, during our meeting with the different grandmasters of Arnis 
Philippines, I met an old master that demonstrated the same techniques that I saw earlier 
from the two men. When I asked the master if he knew of the two, he replied that they 
were his students. The truth will always come out. Giving the right credits to where we have learned 
the techniques from pays a lot of respect to the people who invented it and devoted their 
life in battle just to prove that it works. It is their pride that their names are being 
remembered and honored by us who are now practicing or who have practiced their once 
called forbidden art. … [Read more...]

‘Arnis’ on Philippine Stamps

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  ‘Arnis’ can now be seen on Philippine stamps QUEZON CITY, METRO MANILA- The Philippine Postal Corporation (PhilPost) recently released stamps featuring ‘arnis,’ a Filipino martial arts and the country’s national sport. This is part of efforts to promote the sport throughout the world, the PhilPost said. The special ‘arnis’ stamps capture the unique movement and artistry of this Filipino sport, said PhilPost Postage and Philatelic department manager Lenie San Diego. … [Read more...]

Warrior’s Helmet (Oklop), Ifugao, 19th-early 20th c., National Gallery of Australia.

mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Warrior’s Helmet (Oklop), Ifugao, 19th-early 20th c., National Gallery of Australia.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Helmet, Masbate, 19th c., Museo Nacional de Antropología, Madrid.

7 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Helmet, Masbate, 19th c., Museo Nacional de Antropología, Madrid.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Shield, Bagobo, c 1900-1910, Penn Museum.

6 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 6 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Shield, Bagobo, c 1900-1910, Penn Museum.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Justiniano Asuncion, “A Guardia de Vino: An Officer to Look After the Government Monopolies, Such as Arrack and Tobacco,” c 1841, New York Public Library.

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  Justiniano Asuncion, “A Guardia de Vino: An Officer to Look After the Government Monopolies, Such as Arrack and Tobacco,” c 1841, New York Public Library.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Kalis Ilustrisimo Headquarters aid for Grandmaster Tony Diego

GM Ilustrisimo Diego

To all our Kalis Ilustrisimo brothers and sisters, On the morning of February 24, 2012 a fire raged through a small community in Manila. Many houses were razed to the ground leaving families homeless. We received sad news that the home of Master Tony Diego was among those houses that didn't survive the fire. Absolutely none of their possessions were saved except the clothes on their backs. Master Tony and family are alive and safe but in dire need of assistance. Since the fire, they have been given temporary shelter at the local community center. We would like to solicit the immediate help of our brothers and sisters in Kalis Ilustrisimo and other kind souls to send aid for Master Tony and his family. Since Master Tony has no home at the moment, donations in kind may pose a problem. Instead, cash donations would be preferred and much appreciated. All parties who would like to make a donation are requested to send us a private message on our facebook page or email us at kalis.ilustrisimo.hq@gmail.com so that we can make arrangements to receive your donation. Thank you! Kalis Ilustrisimo Headquarters … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses

ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/ lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/ lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org

Guro Ariel with Grandmaster Manois in Washington State, 1998  Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012. . http://mandirigma.org/?p=1537 To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://combatfma.com/index.html http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeyr9T6qD34   Grandmaster Manois Tournament and Official at FACLA Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles, 2000     Guro Ariel with student at his school Washington State, Guro Ariel, Guro Dino, Grandmaster Conrad Manaois and daughter, Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles, 1998     Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Choy Flores, Guro Dino Flores in Washington State Guro Ariel Flores Mosses with Master Ricketts in Washington State Guro Ariel Flores Mosses with Master Ricketts, Maste Galang, Master Dodong in Washington State Guro Ariel and Guro Dino being filmed by student Ron Gabriel. Location in the backyard of Guro Ariel's Mothers house in Los Angeles, 2000 Guro Ariels Lameco I.D. Number one for Washington State and Lameco Representative. 1995 … [Read more...]

Indigenous peoples of the Philippines

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Indigenous peoples of the Philippines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The indigenous peoples of the Philippines consist of a large number of indigenous ethnic groups living in the country. They are the descendants of the original inhabitants of the Philippines who have managed to resist centuries of Spanish and United States colonization and in the process have retained their customs and traditions.[1] In the 1990s, there were more than 100 highland tribal groups constituted approximately 3% of the population. The upland tribal groups were a blend in ethnic origin like other lowland Filipinos, although they did not have contact with the outside world. They displayed a variety of social organization, cultural expression and artistic skills. They showed a high degree of creativity, usually employed to embellish utilitarian objects, such as bowls, baskets, clothing, weapons and spoons. These groups ranged from various Igorot tribes, a group that includes the Bontoc, Ibaloi, Ifugao, Isneg, Kalinga and Kankana-ey, who built the Rice Terraces. They also covered a wide spectrum in terms of their integration and acculturation with lowland Christian and Muslim Filipinos. Native groups such as the Bukidnon in Mindanao, had intermarried with lowlanders for almost a century. Other groups such as the Kalinga in Luzon have remained isolated from lowland influence. There were several indigenous groups living in the Cordillera Central of Luzon in 1990. At one time it was employed by lowland Filipinos in a pejorative sense, but in recent years it came to be used with pride by native groups in the mountain region as a positive expression of their ethnic identity. The Ifugaos of Ifugao Province, the Bontocs, Kalinga, Tinguian, the Kankana-ey and Ibaloi were all farmers who constructed the rice terraces for many centuries. Other mountain peoples of Luzon are the Isnegs of northern Kalinga-Apayao Province, the Gaddangs of the border between Kalinga-Apayao, and Isabela provinces and the Ilongots of Nueva Vizcaya Province and Caraballo Mountains all developed hunting and gathering, farming cultivation and headhunting. Other indigenous people such as the Negritos formerly dominated the highlands throughout the islands for thousands of years, but have been reduced to a small population, living in widely scattered locations, primarily along the eastern ranges of the mountains. In the southern Philippines, upland and lowland tribal groups were concentrated on Mindanao and western Visayas, although there are several indigenous groups such as the Mangyan living in Mindoro. Among the most important groups found on Mindanao are collectively called the Lumad, and includes the Manobo, Bukidnon of Bukidnon Province, Bagobo, Mandaya, and Mansaka, who inhabited the mountains bordering the Davao Gulf; the Subanon of upland areas in the Zamboanga; the Mamanua in the Agusan-Surigao border region; the Bila-an, Tiruray and Tboli in the region of the Cotabato province, and the Samal and Bajau in the Sulu Archipelago. The tribal groups of the Philippines are known for their carved wooden figures, baskets, weaving, pottery and weapons. Reservation The Philippine government succeeded in establishing a number of protected reservations for tribal groups. Indigenous people were expected to speak their native language, dress in their traditional tribal clothing, live in houses constructed of natural materials using traditional architectural designs and celebrate their traditional ceremonies of propitiation of spirits believed to be inhabiting their environment. They are also encouraged to re-establish their traditional authority structure in which, as in indigenous society were governed by chieftains known as Rajah and Datu. Contact between "primitive" and "modern" ethnic groups usually resulted in weakening or destroying tribal culture without assimilating the indigenous groups into modern society. It seemed doubtful that the shift of the Philippine government policy from assimilation to cultural pluralism could reverse the process. Several Filipino tribes tends to lead to the abandonment of traditional culture because land security makes it easier for tribal members to adopt the economic process of the larger society and facilitates marriage with outsiders. In the past, the Philippine government bureaus could not preserve tribes as social museum exhibits, but with the aid of various nationwide organizations, they hoped to help the tribes adapt to modern society without completely losing their ethnic identity.   … [Read more...]

Hospecio Balbuena Balani, Jr. segment from the book “Masters of the Blade” by Master Rey Galang, 2006

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                    … [Read more...]

Majapahit Empire, 1293 – 1500.

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Majapahit was a vast archipelagic empire based on the island of Java from 1293 to around 1500. Majapahit reached its peak of glory during the era of Hayam Wuruk, whose reign from 1350 to 1389 marked by conquest which extended through Southeast Asia. His achievement is also credited to his prime minister, Gajah Mada. According to the Nagarakretagama (Desawarñana) written in 1365, Majapahit was an empire of 98 tributaries, stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea; consisting of present day Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, southern Thailand, the Philippines, and East Timor, although the true nature of Majapahit sphere of influence is still the subject of studies among historians. Majapahit was one of the last major empires of the region and is considered to be one of the greatest and most powerful empires in the history of Indonesia and Southeast Asia, one that is sometimes seen as the precedent for Indonesia's modern boundaries. Its influence extended beyond the modern territory of Indonesia and has been a subject of many studies. German orientalist Berthold Laufer suggested that maja came from the Javanese name of Indonesian tree. (From Wikipedia)                   … [Read more...]

Balintawak Grandmaster Venancio Bacon

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  Balintawak History Born in 1912, Venancio "Anciong" Bacon would later become one of the Philippines' legendary and most influential eskrimadors in history. He was born in Carcar, Cebu, and moved later to San Nicolas Town, just outside of Cebu City. He learned eskrima in the 1920s as a teenager. His evolution as an eskrimador began in San Nicolas. This journey would later lead him to death matches, attacks, and eventually to jail. But, not all of this journey was dismal. Along the way, Venancio Bacon made life long friends, and cultivated a loyal cadre of students, who to this day maintain an affinity incomparable towards him. Venancio Bacon's legacy, Balintawak, has become a title synonymous to Deadly. Balintawak eskrima is Economy, Elegance, Strength, and Speed expertly woven into one art form. This is the story of Great Grandmaster Venancio Bacon and the account of his legacy. In the early 1900s, the Spaniards had just left the Philippines, ending their 300 year rule. In their place, came the Americans. The vanguard elite of Cebu still spoke Spanish, while the Americans began to "pacify" and teach the rest of the Filipinos American English and culture. It was during this time that Venancio Bacon was born into, a nation in the midst of change and upheaval. He was born in Carcar, Cebu, but grew up in San Nicolas Town outside of Ciudad de Cebu, which at that time was populated by Cebu's elite upper class. This elite class was made up of Europeans, Americans, Chinese and mestizo Filipinos. In contrast, San Nicolas was composed of local Cebuanos and immigrants from neighboring towns, or from other islands in the Visayas. The people who lived in San Nicolas were farmers, carpenters, fishermen, peasants, cargadors and the servants for the City of Cebu's upper class. Venancio Bacon began training in the art of eskrima in the 1920s. His only teacher was Lorenzo "Ensong" Saavedra, of San Nicolas, who during this time had established the historic Labangon Fencing Club. At a time when many different styles of eskrima abound, Lorenzo Saavedra's was called the Corto Linear, although he was also known to have mastered other styles. His best students would be Teodoro "Doring" Saavedra, his nephew, and Venancio Bacon. The two were also very close friends. Both matured into great eskrimadors, improving each other's skills and answering challenge matches that came as a result of their newly acquired titles. The Labangon Fencing Club eventually dissipated into oblivion, giving way to a new organization borne out of its ashes. In 1933, the Doce Pares Club was formed. Headed by Lorenzo Saavedra, the club was composed of three Saavedra eskrimadors and nine from the Canete family. This composed the original twelve needed to symbolically actualize the title Doce Pares, which was taken from a popular roving play in the Philippines during the late 1800s and early 1900s depicting the twelve warrior swordsmen of Charlemagne. Another twelve were inducted to the club soon after, making the initial membership twenty-four, or Twelve Pairs. Venancio Bacon was among the first twenty-four. Although there were certain personalities in the club which ran counter to Venancio Bacon's own personality, he stayed and carried his weight as one of its representing eskrimadors. World War II broke out in the 1940s. With the onset of Japanese occupation, many eskrimadors became guerilla fighters, employing their art for the defense of their nation. It was during this time that, Teodoro Saavedra died at the hands of Japanese soldier-executioners. Long after the War, in 1952, Venancio Bacon established the club now known as Balintawak. He finally had enough of the personal bickerings and internal politics of the Doce Pares club. Along with Vincente "Inting" Atillo, Delfin Lopez, Jesus Cui, Timoteo "Timor" Maranga, Lorenzo Gonzales, Isidro Bardilas, Andres Olaibar, and a few others, Venancio Bacon began a new club. The newly formed club started training in the backyard of a watch shop owned by Eduardo Baculi, one of Venancio Bacon's students. This shop was located in a small side street in Colon, called Balintawak Street. The significance of the name Balintawak evoked the three virtues of strength, courage, and honor befitting that of the new club. So, from that day forth the word Balintawak would forever be intertwined with the name Venancio Bacon and to the style of eskrima which has proven its calculated violence effective time and again. Standing at 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighting no more that 120 pounds, Venancio Bacon was a very unassuming man. He was a veteran of a great many death matches in Cebu. Described by many of his students as lightning fast, Venancio Bacon maneuvered through a fight smoothly while exploiting his opponents' balance and coordination. He was known to be very surgical with a stick, able to employ varying force to his exact … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada , March 31st, 2012

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Kapisanang Mandirigma presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada , March 31st, 2012 February 1, 2012 By dinof2 Leave a Comment (Edit) Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar, March 2012 Backyard Eskrima-Lameco SOG Seminar Date: March 31, 2012 Time:10am-4pm Location: 6366 W Sahara, Las Vegas, NV 89146 Rate: $99.00 per person Instructors: Guro Dino Flores & Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Contact: Ariel F. Mosses @ 702.533.9688       … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Jose Diaz Caballero, De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal (1907-1987)

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Grandmaster Jose Diaz Caballero was born on August 7, 1907 in Barrio Ibo, Toledo City, Cebu Province in the Philippine archipelago. As a youth he would travel from barangay (neighborhood) to barangay in order to watch eskrima matches during fiesta celebrations. These demonstrations mostly pre-arranged sparring called De Cadena were more of a cultural presentation than a display of real fighting which he was doggedly searching for. From his observations of these Eskrima exhibitions, he modified the moves with an emphasis on three striking levels: the eyes, lower arms (specifically elbows and hands), and knees. He was a fan of Western movies and often compared his style to the gunslinger “quick draw”. He later founded the devastating style known as De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal. In his prime, Jose Caballero was the Juego Todo champion. Juego Todo was all-out, no-holds-barred and did not allow the combatants to wear any protective gear like masks and armour. Death and permanent injury resulting from these duels was not uncommon. He beat many highly skilled Eskrimadors such as: Simeon Saavedra of Talisay, Balbino Mancao, Vicente Labor, Juan Carolla of Ilocos, Alfredo Macalolan of Negros, Tanciong Lopez from Cebu City, Salomon Canonio, Heneroso Carbajosa, Horje Navajo, Pastor Hingoyon and many lesser known challengers. One of his more notable fights took place in 1936 against an Eskrimador named Anoy, from the nearby town of Tangub. Jose Caballero utilized his system of 1-2-3 strikes in order to disarm and wound the stunned Anoy, who promptly surrendered. The combination of strikes was delivered so quickly, that the crowd had not fully understood what had just taken place. This resulted in the perception that the match was fixed, and they began shouting “TAYOPE!” (fixed). Unlike many so-called death match “duelists” and “unbeaten champions” who can’t even recall the names of the opponents they conquered, the foregoing list of eskrimadors vanquished by GM Caballero is a testament of the authenticity of his title as the Juego Todo champion of his era. No less than GM Filemon “Momoy” Canete of San Miguel Eskrima a good friend of GM Caballero once vouched: “Dili ko makig duwa ana imong eskrima Joe, pangpatay man nag sawa.” (I won’t fool around with your eskrima Joe, it’s for killing pythons.) Grandmaster Caballero served in the Philippine Constabulary and was once assigned to the hostile Moro country of Lanao province. After his retirement from the Constabulary, he continued to teach his brand of Eskrima, and at the same time, the challenges that were part and parcel of the art continued to hound him. The remaining living witness to GM Caballero’s Juego Todo duels is Egmidio Tubal a retired PC soldier of Davao City. The old warrior died on August 24 1987 … [Read more...]

BOOK: THE JAPANESE OCCUPATION (Kasaysayan History of the Filipino People Vol 7) by Ricardo T. Jose (1998)

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  The book tells of a dark chapter in the history of the Philippines during World War 2. Publisher: Reader's Digest Author: Ricardo  Jose Pages: 303 Contents: 1. The Zero Hour 2. The Advent of War 3. A Retreat to Bataan 4. The End of Organized Resistance 5. Under the Rising Sun 6. Independence Under Japan 7. Uniting a Nation At War 8. The controlled Economy 9. Never Enough Food 10. Reshaping the Filipino Mind 11. Free Areas and Resistnace Fighters 12. Waiting for Victory Joe     … [Read more...]

BOOK: Retaking the Philippines – America’s Return to Corregidor and Bataan: October 1944 – March 1945 By William B. Brewer.

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Retaking the Philippines - America's Return to Corregidor and Bataan: October 1944 - March 1945. By William B. Brewer. "In 1944, General MacArthur launched a series of invasions he would later call 'the boldest and most daring in military history, ' the recapture of Manila, Corregidor and Bataan in the South Pacific. Here William B. Breuer reexamines and recreates this important episode of World War II: the initial clash between MacArthur and Navy brass; the raids on Japanese prison camps at Los Banos and Manila to rescue U. S. Soldiers and civilians, the heroics of Allied spies and Filipino guerrillas.                       … [Read more...]

BOOK: Color Photos Of America’s New Possessions by F. Tennyson Neely (1899)

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Color Photos Of America's New Possessions by  F. Tennyson Neely (1899) Collection of color photographs of the Spanish - American War military actions in the Philippines. Many of these photographs are not found in any other books!   Read it online at The Library of Congress . http://www.archive.org/stream/neelyscolorphoto00newy#page/n0/mode/2up http://www.archive.org/details/neelyscolorphoto00newy       … [Read more...]

BOOK: FOUNDERS OF FREEDOM, The History of the Three Philippine Constitutions (1971)

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Description: The book tells the history of struggle for freedom in the Philippines, from the first massive filipino alliance against Spain during the 16th century, to the Philippine Revolution, to the founding of the Philippine republic, and the succession of Presidents up to the time of President Marcos. Its a book that conditions citizens to the framing of the new Constitution in 1972. In the introduction reads: "Seventy-Three years ago, on 12 June 1898, General Emilio Aguinaldo, Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the Revolution, declared the independence of the Philippines at Kawit". Writers: Vicente Albano Pacis, Dr. Jose M. Aruego, Esteban De Ocampo, Carlos Quirino, Jose Luna Castro, Mauro Garcia, Isidro L. Retizos, D.H. Soriano Publisher: Elena Hollman Roces Foundation, Inc         … [Read more...]

BOOK: The Philippine Islands and Japan By G. Waldo Browne (1901)

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Illustrated with Photogravure, Colored Plates, Engravings and Maps Richly illustrated with 166 RARE vintage photographs and illustrations from the early 1900's ! You will take a journey with the author G. Waldo Browne and view many historical, cultural, and incredible photographs of a time forgotten. Writing about his travels, G. Waldo Browne gave his readers detailed stories and interesting information about the local history, myths, and facts of the countries he visited so that every American could get a glimpse, first hand of the worlds beyond our shores.   Contents The Philippine Islands, By Maj.-Gen. Joseph Wheeler Japan, By Kogoro Takahira The Philippines The Pearls Of The Orient The People Of The Philippines The Animal Kingdom Spanish Discovery And Dominion Rivalry Of Church And State Colonial Wars Resources And Commerce Most Noted Towns Struggles For Liberty America In The Orient Japan The Land Of The Gods The Gateway Of The Orient First Glimpses The Imperial Roads The Modern Capital Customs And Costumes City And Country   Full Page Engravings Courtyard To Chinese Temple Suspension Bridge Connecting Old And New Manila Water Front At Manila Native Milk Peddlers In The Suburbs Of Manila Santa Cruz Plaza, Manila Native Theatre, Taguig General Otis And Staff At The Governor’s Palace, Manila Rainy Season In The Eremita District Hawaiian Flowers, Coloured Principal Gateway, Old Manila Hawaiian Flowers. Coloured Manila Fire Department Group Of Insurgents, Taken Prisoners Cigar Factory, Manila A Company Of Insurgents Graves Of The Astor Battery Headquarters, Pasig Hawaiian Flowers. Coloured Three Little Maids. Coloured Fujiyama From Maeda Village, Tokaido Peony Garden, Kanazawa The Beautiful Iris Bluff Garden, Yokohai Chrysanthemums Walking Costume Coloured Tea-House Garden, Oji, Tokio A Typical Japanese Lady Planting Rice Kirifuri Cascade, Nikko   Coloured Maps The Philippines Japan Illustrations The Philippines Landscape On East Side Of Mindanao Mail Station On Bay Of Ulugan Volcano Of Apo Volcano Of Mayon, Luzon Looking Up Pasig River At Pretil Just Above Manila Native Village, Island Of Negros Bamboo Bridge, Iloilo Construction Of A Philippino House Bamboo Yard Native Houses Village On Mindanao General View Of Iloilo Manila Street, Rainy Season Manila Street, Rainy Season Types Of Malays Negritos Native Warrior From Interior Of Mindanao Philippino Fruit Girl A Wealthy Half-Caste Philippino Lady Mestizos Sulu Prau Sultan Of Sulu Interviewing European Visitors Mohammed, Sultan Of Sulu Igorrotes Igorrote Pipes Carabaos Transporting Army Stores Village On The Island Of Guimaras Street-Cars In Manila Young Wild Goat Calao Bird Peacock Village On Mindanao River Scene On Mindanao Mindanao Warrior Merchant Vessels, Pasig River Mouth Of River Coihulo, Palawan Village Of Bahele, Palawan Oldest Church In Manila Arsenal At Puerto Princessa, Palawan Drawbridge And Gate Of Old City Old Cannon On Sea-Wall At Manila River Scene Near Iloilo Spanish Priest Ancient Gate At Manila A Tagalo Bungalow In Luzon Philippino Girl Church And Square At Malolos Old Stone Bridge Near Manila Manila Street, Rainy Season Manila Street, Rainy Season The Native Market At Manila On The Wall Of The Old City Of Manila Native Boats On Pasig Above Bridge Of Spain Rita Island, Bay Of Ulugan Cavite Arsenal And Shipyard Bathing Place At Manila A Tagalo Family Out For A Drive In A Caretela Travel In Rainy Season Volcano Of Apo Scene In Bulacan Plantation On Mindanao Scene At Puerto Princessa, Palawan Cigar Dealer Street In Old Manila Train On Manila And Dagupin Railway Manila And Dagupin Railway Station Governor’s Palace, Manila Village In The Suburbs Of Manila Street In Business Section Of Manila Fountain On Promenade San Miguel, Manila Cavite Arsenal Social Entertainment Under Spanish Regime Schoolhouse Village Of Olas Pinas, On Outskirts Of Manila Dagaupan, Rio Horno Sulu Woman A Native Of Malabon And His Family Emilio Aguinaldo, Leader Of Insurrection Of 1899 Cannon Used By Insurgents In 1899 Mountain Cataract Sentry Post On The Luneta Road Scene In Suburbs Of Manila Aguinaldo’s Family And Relatives Admiral George Dewey U. S. S. Olympia U. S. S. Baltimore The Battle Of Manila Bay Major-General Wesley Merritt Group Of Officers, Leaders Of Insurrection, 1899 General Augusti Islets Of Calamianes Group, Between Mindoro And Palawan General Otis F. Agoncillo, Envoy Of Insurgents Plaza Alfonso XII., Iloilo Mountain Inn, Luzon Exterior Of Insurgents Capitol At Malolos, 1899 Mushroom Islands Waterfall And Rapids On Taygula River, Mindanao Boar Japan Greeting Scenery Among The Pine Islands Fujiyama A Farmer Yokohama Harbour A Junk Street On Water-Front, Yokohama Lotus Lake, Myeno Double Bridge In Imperial … [Read more...]

BOOK: UNCLE SAM’S BOYS In PHILIPPINES by By H.Irving Hancock (1912)

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  The Project Gutenberg eBook, Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines, by H. Irving Hancock This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines or, Following the Flag against the Moros Author: H. Irving Hancock Release Date: November 11, 2007 [eBook #23447] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK UNCLE SAM'S BOYS IN THE PHILIPPINES***   E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)     Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines OR Following the Flag against the Moros By H. IRVING HANCOCK Author of Uncle Sam's Boys in the Ranks, Uncle Sam's Boys on Field Duty, Uncle Sam's Boys as Sergeants, The Motor Boat Club Series, The Grammar School Boys Series, The High School Boys Series, The West Point Series, The Annapolis Series, The Young Engineers Series, etc., etc. Illustrated     PHILADELPHIA HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY Copyright, 1912, by Howard E. Altemus Frontispiece. CONTENTS Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines The Filipino Dandy A Meeting at the Nipa Barracks Plotters Travel With the Flag Cerverra's Innocent Shop Enough to "Rattle" the Victim Life Hangs on a Word The Kind of Man Who Masters Others The Right Man in the Guard House News Comes of the Uprising The Insult to the Flag In the First Brush With Moros The Brown Men at Bay—For How Long? A Tale of Moro Blackmail The Call for Midnight Courage In a Cinch With Cold Steel Datto Hakkut Makes a New Move "Long" Green and Kelly Have Innings Sentry Miggs Makes a Gruesome Find Hal Turns the Gatling Gun Loose Corporal Duxbridge's Mistake Scouting in Deadly Earnest Playing Goo-Goo in a Grim Game Dooming the Datto Conclusion Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines CHAPTER I THE FILIPINO DANDY "We've solved one problem at last, Noll," declared Sergeant Hal Overton seriously. "Only one?" demanded young Sergeant Terry quizzically. But Hal, becoming only the more serious, went on earnestly: "At last we begin to understand just what the 'lure of the Orient' means! For years I've been reading about the Orient, and the way that this part of the world charms men and holds them. Now, that we are here on the spot, I begin to understand it all. Noll, my boy, the East is a great and wonderful place! I wonder if I shall ever tire of it?" "I believe I could tire of it in time," remarked Sergeant Terry, of the Thirty-fourth United States Infantry. "But you haven't yet," insisted Sergeant Hal. "What, when we've been here only three days? Naturally I haven't. And, besides, all we've seen is Manila, and certainly Manila can't be more than one little jumping-off corner of the Orient that you're so enthusiastic about." "You're wild about the Far East, too—even the one little corner of it that we've seen," retorted Sergeant Hal. "Don't be a grouch or a knocker, Noll. Own up that you wouldn't start for the United States to-morrow if you were offered double pay back in the home country." "No; I wouldn't," confessed Sergeant Terry. "I want to see a lot more of these Philippine Islands before I go back to our own land." "Just halt where you are and look about you," went on enthusiastic Sergeant Hal. "Try to picture this scene as Broadway, in New York." "Or Main Street in our own little home city," laughed Sergeant Terry quietly. Certainly the scene was entirely different from anything that the two young Army boys had ever seen before. They stood on the Escolta, which is the main business thoroughfare of New Manila, as that portion of the Philippine capital north of the little river is called. South of the river is Old Manila, the walled city of the old days of the Spanish conquerors. South of the walled city lie two rather fashionable residence suburbs, Ermita and Malate. But the Thirty-fourth was temporarily stationed in big nipa barracks at Malate. It was in the newer Manila that the two boyish young sergeants found their greatest interest. It was a busy, bustling scene. There is nothing exactly like the Escolta in any other part of the world. The whole of this crooked, winding thoroughfare seemed alive with horses and people—with the horses in more than goodly proportion. Along the Escolta are the principal wholesale and retail houses of the city. Here is the post office, there the "Botanica" or principal drug store, operating under English capital and a Spanish name; down near the water front is the Hotel de Paris, a place famous for the good dinners of the East. Further up the Escolta, just around a slight bend, is the Oriente Hotel, the stopping … [Read more...]

Project Gutenberg’s The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803, by E.H. Blair

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Project Gutenberg's The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803, by E.H. Blair This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 Volume III, 1569-1576 Author: E.H. Blair Release Date: December 6, 2004 [EBook #13616] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 1493-1803 *** Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders Team. The Philippine Islands, 1493–1803   Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the beginning of the nineteenth century   Volume III, 1569–1576 Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson with historical introduction and additional notes by Edward Gaylord Bourne. Page 1 Contents of Volume III Preface. ... 15 Documents of 1569 Letter to Felipe II. Guido de Lavezaris; Cebu, June 5. ... 29 Letter to Felipe II. Andrés de Mirandaola; Cubu, June 8. ... 33 Letter to Marqués de Falçes. M.L. de Legazpi; Çubu, July 7. ... 44 Relation of the Filipinas islands. M.L. de Legazpi; [Çubu, July 7]. ... 54 Confirmation of Legazpi's title as governor and captain-general. Felipe II; Madrid, August 14. ... 62 Documents of 1570 Letter to Felipe II. Fray Diego de Herrera; Mexico, January 16. ... 69 Relation of the voyage to Luzón. [June, 1570?]. ... 73 Act of taking possession of Luzón. Martin de Goiti and Hernando Riquel; Manila, June 6. ... 105 Letter to Felipe II. M. L. de Legazpi; Panae, July 25. ... 108 Evidence regarding the Portuguese expedition against Cebú. M.L. de Legazpi; Çubu, October 21. ... 113 Page 2 Documents of 1571–72 Relation of the discoveries of the Malucos and Philippinas. [1571?]. ... 121 Requisitions of supplies for the Spanish forces in the Philippines [1571?]. ... 132 Conquest of the island of Luzon. Manila, April 20, 1572. ... 141 Foundation of the city of Manila. Fernando Riquel; Manilla, June 19, 1572. ... 173 Documents of 1573 Expenses incurred for the expedition to the Western Islands, 1569–72. Melchior de Legazpi; Mexico, March 2. ... 177 Affairs in the Philippines after the death of Legazpi. Guido de Lavezaris; Manila, June 29. ... 179 Relation of the Western Islands called Filipinas. Diego de Artieda. ... 190 Letter from the viceroy of New Spain to Felipe II. Martin Enriquez; Mexico, December 5. ... 209 Documents of 1574 Letter to Felipe II. Andrés de Mirandaola; January 8. ... 223 1Las nuevas quescriven de las yslas del Poniente Hernando Riquel y otros; Mexico, January 11. ... 230 Two royal decrees regarding Manila and Luzón. Felipe II; Madrid, June 21. ... 250 Opinion regarding tribute from the Indians. Fray Martin de Rada; Manila, June 21. ... 253 Page 3 Reply to Fray Rada's “Opinion.” Guido de Lavezaris and others; [Manila, June, 1574?]. ... 260 Two letters to Felipe II. Guido de Lavezaris; Manila, July 17 and 30. ... 272 Slavery among the natives. Guido de Lavezaris; [July?]. ... 286 Documents of 1575–76 Part of a letter to the viceroy. Guido de Lavezaris; [Manila, 1575?]. ... 291 Letter to Felipe II. Juan Pacheco Maldonado; [Manila, 1575?]. ... 295 Encomiendas forbidden to royal officials. Francisco de Sande, and others; Manila, May 26, 1576. ... 304 Letter to Felipe II. Francisco de Sande; Manila, June 2, 1576. ... 312 Bibliographical Data. ... 315 Page 4 1 This document is printed in both Spanish text and English translation. Illustrations Portrait of Fray Martin de Rada, O.S.A.; photographic reproduction of painting in possession of Colegio de Agustinos Filipinos, Valladolid. ... Frontispiece Landing of the Spaniards at Cebú, in 1565; photographic reproduction of a painting at the Colegio de Agustinos Filipinos, Valladolid. ... 35 Map showing the first landing-place of Legazpi in the Philippines; photographic facsimile of original (manuscript) map, contained in the pilots' log-book of the voyage, preserved in the Archivo General de Indias, at Sevilla. ... 47 “Asiae nova descriptio” (original in colors), map in Theatrum orbis terrarum, by Abraham Ortelius (Antverpiae, M. D. LXX), fol. 3; reduced photographic facsimile, from copy in Boston Public Library. ... 86, 87 Page 5 Preface The documents presented in this volume cover the last three years of Legazpi's administration in the islands, the governorship of Guido … [Read more...]

1609: The Spanish Conquest of Philippines Argensola, B. L. Lic. (1609)

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Author: Argensola, B. L. Lic. Title: Conquista de las Islas Malucas al Rey Felipe III. N.  Sr. Escrita por el capellán de la  Magestad de la Emperatriz y Retor de Villa hermosa. Date and publisher: Madrid. Ediciones de Alonso Martín. 1609. Description: First  edition of one of the first books to deal fully with the Spanish conquest of  the Moluccas, the Spice Islands, and of the Philippines, 1564--1572, under the conquistador Miguel López de  Legaspi. This famous book deals with those exploits, with the natural history  of these islands, the manners and customs of the natives and the voyages  through the Straits of Magellan; regarded by Hill as an 'essential work for the  history of Spanish and Portuguese exploration in the East Indies'. Argensolas´ narrative is noted for its  breadth of knowledge and over-all grasp of world politics. 'In his digressions  on people and places,' writes Lach (Asia in the making of Europe, III,  pp. 311-12), 'Argensola´s adds significantly to the stockpile of information on  Asia, especially on the Moluccas, Java, Sumatra, and Ceylon. His book also ties  together neatly the affairs of Europe with struggles in the overseas areas, for he sees the  spice trade in its worldwide ramifications and makes his reader acutely aware  of its immediate and potential interest for Japan and China.´ Binding: Modern  half-vellum. Size: 11 x 7.5   inches / 28,5 x 15 cm. An  unusually large copy (most copies have the title page trimmed). Number of pages: 10 + 407 pages. Conquista de las Islas Molucas (1609) [Rare McPar DS674 .L4 1609], written by Bartolomé Leonardo de Argensola, a Spanish historian and poet who took holy orders and was later appointed royal chaplain and historiographer of Aragon. This particular text was commissioned by the Council of the Indies to commemorate the Spanish recapture of the Moluccan Islands of Ternate and Tidore in 1606. It was very well received upon its initial publication, and continues to be an important source for research into Spanish and Portuguese exploration in the East Indies, the conquest of the Philippines, and the history of the spice trade, especially since Argensola consulted numerous primary sources in the archives of the Indies when writing this work. Our volume is bound in its original brown leather over paper boards, though the spine has been rebacked in brown leather gilt and the endpapers replaced. The text itself is very finely printed, with numerous ornamental head- and tail-pieces and woodcut initials, and an especially fine engraved title page. This page, pictured below, illustrates, within an elaborate architectural border, an allegory of the Spanish conquest of the Moluccas. The amazon queen “Maluca” is depicted seated astride a crocodile, wearing a feather headdress and holding a sword in her left hand while in her right she raises a horn of plenty filled with the fruits of her lands. Her gaze is directed upward to where a rainbow is shown containing the royal crest of Spain, shimmering in the light, signifying, with the word simul, the fact that the sun never sets on the Spanish empire. In the background is an active volcano, of which there are several on these islands, and seashells are strewn before her feet. … [Read more...]

BOOK: THE JESUITS IN THE PHILIPPINES 1581-1768 by H.V. de la Costa, S.J. (1951)

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    Description: "This fascinating story of cross and sword, laid in an extraordinary setting, describes the role of the Jesuits in the Philippines. Their history- as missionaries, educators, and colonizers - is so entwined with that of the Islands that one cannot be discussed without the other. Accordingly, documents in the Roman, Spanish and Philippines archives of the Prder, as well as those of the general colonial achives at Madrid and Seville, have been colorfully employed to present a wide segment of the general history of the Spanish empire in the PHilippines and the Far East." -- first paragraph of the dust jacket text.   The book contains maps and illustrations Author: H. de la Costa, S.J. Pages: 702           … [Read more...]

BOOK: A Woman’s Journey Through The Philippines by Florence Kimball Russel, 1907

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    A Woman's Journey Through The Philippines On A Cable Ship That Linked Together The Strange Lands Seen En Route. By Florence Kimball Russel Author of "Born to the Blue" Etc.   Contents Introductory Statements Dumaguete Misamis Iligan Cagavan Cebu Zamboanga Sulu Bongao Tampakan and the Home Stretch   Illustrations The Belle of Bongao Laying a Shore End in a Philippine Coast Town "Until eventide the summer skies above us slept, as sid the summer seas below us" A Philippine Coast Town Dumaguete Diving for Articles Thrown from the Ship "Hard at work establishing an office in the town" "Two women beating clothes on the rocks of a little stream" Church and convento, Dumaguete The Old Fort at Misamis "The native band serenaded us" The Lintogup River A Misamis Belle Laying Cable from a Native Schooner A Street in Iligan Market-day at Iligan "It was evident that he was a personage of no little importance" St. Thomas Church, Cebu Magellan's Chapel, Cebu Unloading Hemp at Cebu Grove of Palms near Cebu Ormoc Releasing the Buoy From the Cable in a Heavy Sea Quarters of the Commanding Officer, Zamboanga Officers' Quarters, Zamboanga A Street in Zamboanga Street Scene, Zamboanga Native Bathing-place, Zamboanga The Pier at Sulu Natives of Sulu Moro Houses, Tuli The Moro School for Boys, Sulu Chinese, Moro, and Visayan Children, Sulu Soldiers' Quarters, Bongao Natives of Bongao Toolawee Market-day in a Moro Village A Group of Moros A Collection of Moro Weapons Pasacao Illustrated With 40 Rare Photographic Plates                                                 … [Read more...]

BOOK: The Hawaiian Islands, Manila and The Edge Of China by Burton Holmes, 1901

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Burton Holmes Lectures Hawaiian Islands Edge Of China Manila Old Antique Travelogue With Over 350 Photographs ! Subjects covered in this book Advertisements Chinese native runners at Hong Kong, Aguinaldo General military operations, Ah Cum Canton guide, Ah Fong Chinese Croesus, Hawaiian home, Macao residence, Ah Kee Incident on the Esmeralda, Ancestor Worship China, Ancestral Temples China, Aqueducts Hawaii, Bacoor Bay battle in distance, Baliuag military operations, Aguinaldo, American garrison, Church used by American soldiers, Distress signals, Exhibition of defense manoeuvers, Military rule, Page Colonel in command, Telegraph wires cut, Bank of Hongkong, Banquets U S troops in Honolulu, Barbara Fritchie uptodate incident on the Esmeralda, Barges used as houseboats Canton, Barracks, Baliuag church used by American soldiers, Manila theater, Bathing American troops at Honolulu, Beer American Manila, BetelNuts chewing China, Betting See Gambling, Binondo commercial district of Manila, Bluffs Hawaiian coast, Boats, Canton, Filipino bote, Surfriding at Waikiki, Bridge over Pasig river, Brumby FlagLieut U S S, Olympia at Hongkong, Bubonic Plague Hongkong, Buffalo in Manila, Business in Honolulu, Cabs Manila, Cafe de Paris Manila, Caldwell secretary to Admiral, Dewey, Calesa Filipino cart, Calle Nozaleda Manila, Camoens Luiz de, Caneflumes Hawaii, Cane See Sugarcane, Canton, Ah Cum guide, Arrival of travellers, Boats, Clocks, Commercial gateway to south China, Consul visit to U S, Dentists, Descriptions manners and customs, Emigration to United States, Execution place of, French cathedral, Gates of city closing, Hongkong to Canton journey, Hotel Victoria, Kerosene lamps, Literary refuse, Pawn shops, Photography difficulties, Port of Canton See Hongkong, Provincial mint, River front, River steamer from Macao, Sanitary conditions, Shameen foreign quarter, Shops, Streets, Care of, Life in, Signs and names, Temple of the emperor, Viceroy Yeh, Water dwellers on, Carabao, Carriage Filipino calesa, Cataracts Hawaii, Cathedrals, Canton French cathedral, Manila, Cavite scene of naval battle, Chairs bamboo, China, Ability of the Chinese, Ah Fong, Ambition of every Chinese boy, Ancestor worship, Betelnuts chewing, Canton See that title, Coolie labor, Commerce British, Consuls See that title, Currency, Day length and divisions, Dinner parties, Disembarkation methods, Education, Emigration from China to U S, Emperor temple of, First impressions, Food, Funeral rites and care of dead, Gods, Hawaiian Islands Chinese population, Heung Shan Island, Hongkong, Hotels Canton, Jinrikishas Honkong, Journey to, Kowloon shipyards, Li Hung Chang, Macao See that title, Money, Officials preliminary education, Paper with writing preservation of, Pawn shops Canton, Photography experiences, Canton, Dewey Admiral at Hongkong, Pigs sacred, Progress opposition to, Religion, Rivercraft, Sampans, Scholarship, Steerage passengers Chinese, Temples ancestral, Time measurement, Women, Churches, Baliuag used by American soldiers, Macao San Paulo, Manila San Sebastian, Clocks Chinese, Cockfights Manila prohibited by American government, Coffee in Hawaii, Commerce Hongkong, Consuls visits to United States, Smith Hub at Canton, Wildman R at Hongkong, Cook Captain in Hawaii, Coolies Chinese, Coral Reef Pearl Harbor, Corregidor Manila Bay, Cortes Brothers, Curfew law in Manila, Dagupan railway Philippines, Damien Father of Mobkai, Dampness Hongkong, Day length and division in China, Dead care of China, Deities Chinese, Dentists Canton, Dewey Admiral at Hongkong, Diamond Head Honolulu view of, Dinner Party Chinese, Dress, Hawaiian women’s holokus, Hongkong white suits, Dutch Wife Manila hotel, Education China, Emigrants from China, Empress of China voyage to China, Escolta Manila, Esmeralda voyage to Manila, Arrival at Manila, Bacoor Bay, Barbara Fritchie incident, Cavite, Corregidor, Heat, Humidity, Manila Bay, Quarantine, Rain, Sleeping places, Traveling companion, Execution place of Canton, Father Damien of Molokai, Father of Annexation Dr McGrew of Pearl Harbor, Ferries Manila, Filipinos See Philippines; Manila, Fire Brigade Manila, Fire Drill on Empress of China, Fire Goddess Pele, Flag Hawaiian, Flameflowers Honolulu bowers, Flowers, Flameflowers, Leis, Flowerboats as restaurants Canton, Food, Chinese, Hawaiian, Friars Spanish at Manila, Funerals Chinese, Garlands Hawaiian leis, Gates Canton closing, Gods Chinese, Government Building Honolulu, Griffin Far Eastern word for tenderfoot, Guide Ah Cumin Canton, Gulches Hawaiian, Haleakala Hawaiian volcanic crater, Harbor Pearl Hawaiian, Hawaii island of, Bluffs, Coffeeland, Hilo, Kealakekua Bay monument to Capt Cook, Kilauea volcano, Mauna Kea mountain, Mauna Loa, Ports, Hawaiian Islands, American soldiers, Annexation to U, Coffee plantations, Cook Captain, First impressions of, Flag description, Hawaii island of, Hilo, … [Read more...]

BOOK: Through The Philippines (and Hawaii), 1925-1926, by Frank G. Carpenter – Litt. D., F.R.G.S.

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Title: Through The Philippines (and Hawaii) Date: 1925-1926 Author: Frank G. Carpenter - Litt. D., F.R.G.S. A wonderful old book richly illustrated with 112 RARE high quality vintage photographs taken in the early 1900's ! You will take a journey with the author Frank G. Carpenter and view many historical, cultural, and incredible photographs of a time forgotten. Writing about his travels in the series "Carpenter's World Travels", Frank G. Carpenter gave his readers detailed stories and fascinating information about the local history, myths, and facts of the countries he visited so that every American could get a glimpse, first hand of the worlds beyond our shores. This book is mainly about the Philippines, but it also has a section about Hawaii.   Chapters Just a word before we start From Athens to Manila The Philippine capital, old and new In the Tondo market The fair Filipina Going to school in Manila Tobacco fields and factories Through Northern Luzon by rail Baguio Our heathen wards Camp John Hayand the Igorots The Benguet gold mines The School Republic of Munoz Homesteading in the Philippines By ponyback through the forest The rice terraces of Ifugaoland Where Magellan raised the flag of Spain Coconut farms The world's biggest leper colony On the Sugar Island of Negros In Zamboanga, capital of Moroland Basilan, our new Rubber Island Motoring across Jolo The Sultan of Sulu Davao, land of Manilla hemp The Bagobos and their neighbours The business man of the Philippines The question of independence Hawaii, at the crossroads of the Pacific Our sugar and pineapple islands List of photographs Scene in Zamboanga Riding in a chair through the mountains Mt. Taal San Juan Bridge The waterways of Manila The Luneta Business section of Manila The Parian Gate The walls of old Manila Residence of the Governor-General A Philippine stove Hauling coconut husks Market day in Manila The papaya A Filipina in business A fair Filipina Hat-making for export Girls' baseball team. Weaving by hand The high school at Batangas Learning the English language Exercising on the playgrounds Growing vegetables in a school garden A Philippine star baseball player A Philippine cigarette-maker Tobacco growing Bringing in the rice Threshing Rice planting Pounding out the grain. Lingayen Gulf Baguio The Benguet Road Philippine caddies Going to market on Sunday Mountain road of Luzon Igorot porter Igorot girls learning to sew Camp John Hay Ilongot head-hunters A family of Apayaos An Igorot miner The Benguet gold mine Studying mining methods in the wilds of Luzon "Poor man's rice" Farming at Munoz Ploughing with the carabao Student's house at Munoz Bamboo I gorot road-workers Carabaos taking a bath Homesteaders on the move Threshing rice with carabaos A motor truck in the wilds of Mountain Province A Philippine forest Hauling logs Rice terraces of the Ifugaos An Ifugao home Ifugao types Where Magellan heard mass at Cebu A solid wheeled cart of Cebu A fishing boat Eating coconuts Coconut rafts A copra pack train Drying coconuts Leper colony on Culion Island Penal farm at San Ramon Bilibid prisoners at work Meal-time at the prison A Shakespearean play at Silliman Institute Primitive sugar mill Cutting sugar cane American tractors in the Philippines Cock fighting Port at Zamboanga Moro girls studying the Koran A Mindanao policeman. A Moro chieftain's daughter Mr. Carpenter interviews a Moro Tapping a rubber tree Rubber gatherers of Basilan A sheet of crepe rubber Jolo, the capital of the Sulu Archipelago A Bajao woman climbing to her home Moro dattos Bamboo water tube The Sultan of Sulu Pearl fisherman of the Sulu Sea Manila hemp Stripping the hemp Drying the abaca fibre Mat-weaving Bagobo man wearing a grass jacket A house in the tree-tops A Chinese schoolhouse The Chinese pier at Jolo Manila's Chinatown The port at Manila The Executive Building in Manila A session of the Philippine Legislature Where the Philippine laws are made Army and Navy Club at Manila A Filipino school boy Rugged shores of the Hawaiian Islands Waikiki Beach Pineapple fields Sugar-cane flumes Laying paper mulch for pineapples Scene on the island of Oahu Mt. Kilauea   A sampling of the author's writing... To-night I have been sitting in the Luneta, the great breathing place for Manila. As the sun dropped behind Mount Mariveles, the headland at the north entrance to Manila Bay, the sky flamed with a gorgeous colour. Gentle breezes from the ocean swept over the park and the lapping of the waves mingled with the murmur of talk or gave way before the stirring music of the military band. All Manila was out in full force, strolling about, chatting between numbers, sitting on benches or in cars and carriages. I have seldom seen so many motors parked at any Marine Band concert in Washington … [Read more...]

BOOK: MAGAGANDANG SALAYSAY Andrea Amor Tablan & Ursula E. Calma, 1950

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Description: Interesting stories, from Philippine myths and legends. Some of the stories are: The first people on earth; Ang Inahin, Legend of Mayon, The butterfly and the worm, the airplane, Ang Mayaman at Mahirap. Illustrated, large fonts.  All stories are in Tagalog. Publisher: Philippine Book Co. 1950 Pages: 165     … [Read more...]

Book: 1898, Our New Possessions – Philippine Islands, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Hawaiian Islands by Trumbull White

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  Our New Possessions Four Volumes in One…Philippine Islands, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Hawaiian Islands by Trumbull White, Illustrated by numerous photos, First printing Edition (presumed,) 1898, A. B. Kuhlman Press Company Book Publisher Publishing, LCCC 00-0000,  9 X 7 inches, pp 676, Hard cover, Contents Vintage history book on the newest lands to the United States in 1898.  These lands were to have very different futures as two remain key elements of the US while two others are independent once again.  The real value and beauty of this book is in the huge number of vintage images and drawings from all four “possessions.” … [Read more...]

Photograph: Moros fencing with shield and wooden barong : Jolo -1901

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Larawan: Philippine Photographs Digital Archive, Univ. of Michigan Via: Filipino weapons & history ("Filhistory")  … [Read more...]

The Filipino People – Early contacts of the Malays and Hindus, and the rise Islam

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Original Source: https://kahimyang.com/kauswagan/articles/792/the-filipino-people-early-contacts-of-the-malays-and-hindus-and-the-rise-islam The Filipino People - Early contacts of the Malays and Hindus, and the rise Islam   More than two thousand years ago, India produced a remarkable civilization. There were great cities of stone, magnificient palaces, a life of splendid luxury a highly organized social and political system. Writing known as Sanskrit have been developed. Two great religions, Brahminism and Buddhism, arose, the latter still the dominant religion of Tibet, China, and Japan. The people who produced this civilization are known as the Hindus. Fourteen or fifteen hundred years ago Hinduism spread over Burma, Siam, and Java. Great cities were erected with splendid temples and huge idols, the ruins of which still remain, though their magnificence has gone and they are covered today with the growth of the jungle. This powerful civilization of the Hindus, established thus in Malaysia, greatly affected the Malayan people on these islands, as well as those who came to the Philippines. Many words in the Tagalog have been shown to have a Sanskrit origin, and the systems of writing which the Spaniards found in use among several of the Filipino peoples had certainly been developed from the alphabet then in use among these Hindu peoples of Java. A few hundred years later another great change, due to religious faith, came over the Malayan race - a change which has had a great effect upon the history of the Philippines, and is still destined to modify events far into the future. This was the conversion to Islam. Of all the great religions of the world, Mohammedanism was the last to arise, and its career has in some ways been the most remarkable. Mohammed, its founder, was an Arab, born about 572 A.D. At that time Christianity was established entirely around the Mediterranean and throughout most of Europe, but Arabia was idolatrous. Mohammed was one of those great, prophetic souls which arise from time to time in the world's history. All he could learn from Hebraism and Christianity, together with the result of his own thought and prayers, led him to the belief in one God, the Almighty, the Compassionate, the Merciful, who as he believed would win all men to His knowledge through the teachings of Mohammed himself. Thus inspired, Mohammed became a teacher or prophet, and by the end of his life he had won his people to his faith and inaugurated one of the greatest eras of conquest the world has seen. The armies of Arabian horsemen, full of fanatical enthusiasm to convert the world to their faith, in a century's time wrested from Christendom all Judea, Syria, and Asia Minor, the sacred land where Jesus lived and taught, and the countries where Paul and the other apostles had first established Christianity. Thence they swept along the north coast of Africa, bringing to an end all that survived of Roman power and religion, and by 720 they had crossed into Europe and were in possession of Spain. For the nearly eight hundred years that followed, the Christian Spaniards fought to drive Islam from the peninsula, before they were successful. Not only did Islam move westward over Africa and Europe, it was carried eastward as well. Animated by their faith, the Arabs became the greatest sailors, explorers, merchants, and geographers of the age. They sailed from the Red Sea down the coast of Africa as far as Madagascar, and eastward to India, where they had settlements on both the Malabar and Coromandel coasts. Thence Arab missionaries brought their faith to Malaysia. At that time the true Malays, the tribe from which the common term "Malayan" has been derived, were a small people of Sumatra. At least as early as 1250 they were converted to Islam, brought to then by these Arabian missionaries, and under the impulse of this mighty faith they broke from their obscurity and commenced that great conquest and expansion that has diffused their power, language, and religion throughout the East Indies. A powerful Muslim Malay settlement was established on the western coasts of Borneo probably as early as 1400. The more primitive inhabitants, like the Dyaks, who were a tribe of the primitive Malayans, were defeated, and the possession of parts of the coast taken from them. From this coast of Borneo came many of the adventurers who were traversing the seas of the Philippines when the Spaniards arrived. The Muslim population of Mindanao and Jolo owes something certainly to this same Malay migration which founded the colony of Borneo. But the Magindanao and Illanon Moros seem to be largely descendants of primitive tribes, such as the Manobo and Tiruray, who were converted to Islam by Malay and Arab proselyters. The traditions of the Magindanao Moros ascribe their conversion to Kabunsuan, a native of Johore, the son of an Arab father and Malay mother. He came to Magindanao with a band of … [Read more...]

Rajah Sulaiman III, Last Muslim King of Manila (1558 – 1575) – Written in Tagalog by Jose N. Sevilla and Tolentino in the early 1920′s

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Rajah Suliman, Last Muslim King of Manila Rajah Sulaiman III (1558 - 1575) was the last native Muslim king of Manila, now the site of the capital of the Philippines, Manila. He was one of three chieftains, along with Rajah Rajah Lakandula and Adults, to have played a significant role in the Spanish conquests of the kingdoms of the Manila Bay-Pasig River area, first by Martín de Goiti, and Juan de Salcedo in 1570; and later by Miguel Lopez de Legazpi in 1571 The following biography of Rajah Soliman was written in Tagalog by Jose N. Sevilla and Tolentino in the early 1920s:     TALAMBUHAY NI RAHA SOLIMAN Bago nagíng̃ Rahá si Solimán, ay nagíng̃ katulong̃ muna sa pang̃ang̃asiwà ng̃ mg̃a súliranin dito sa Maynilà, ni Raháng̃ Matandâ. Si Lakán Dulà na nanánahanan sa Tundó ay siyá niyáng̃ kasama. Itó ay nang̃ kapanáhunan ni Raháng̃ Matandâ nang̃ taóng̃ 1570. Noón ay isáng̃ pulutóng̃ nang̃ mg̃a sasakyáng̃ kastilà na pinamumunuan ni Martin de Goití at Juan de Salcedo ang̃ dumaong̃ sa luók ng̃ Maynilà. Niyaóng̃ unang̃ datíng̃ dito niná Goití ay dî sila nakalunsád pagdaka. Ang̃ Maynilà, ay may matitibay na mg̃a muóg at sila'y pinaputukán at sinagupà. Nabalitaan niláng isá sa mg̃a makapang̃yarihan doón ay si Solimán, kaya't nagpadalá sina Goití rito ng̃ sugò na nagsásaysáy na silá'y dî naparito upáng̃ makidigmâ kundî upáng̃ makipagkásundô, at ang̃ ganitó'y tinugón sa pamamagitan ng̃ sugò, na ang̃ Hari sa Maynilà ay nagnanasà ng̃ makipagkaibigan sa mg̃a kastilà. Pagtang̃gáp ni Goití ng̃ paklí ni Solimán ay nasók siyá at ang̃ kanyáng̃ mg̃a tao sa ilog ng̃ Pasig at silá'y lumunsád sa isáng̃ baybáy na itinakdâ ng̃ Harì. Sinalubong̃ silá ni Raháng Matandâ at nakipagkamáy sa kanilá, pagkaliban ng̃ iláng̃ sandali ay dumatíng si Rahá Solimán at nakipágkamáy din ng̃uni't nagpasubalì ng̃ gayari: «Kamí ay nagnánasang̃ makipagkaibigan sa mg̃a kastilà samantalang̃ silá'y mabuti sa amin; ng̃uni't mahíhirapan silá ng̃ gaya ng̃ hirap na tiniís na ng̃ ibá, kailán ma't nasain niláng̃ kami'y alisán ng̃ puri». Pagkaraán ng̃ iláng̃ araw si Goití ay nagkulang̃ sa pagkakáibigan sa pagpapaputók ng̃ kaniláng̃ kanyón, at si Rahá Solimán ay napilitang̃ magbago ng̃ kilos. Ipinawasák nitó ang̃ mg̃a sasakyán nina Goití at ipinapuksâ ang̃ kanyáng̃ mg̃a kawal. Nápakabuti ang̃ pagtatang̃gól sa mg̃a kutà at dî nagawâ nang̃ mg̃a kastilà ang̃ makapasok agád, ng̃uni't nang̃ mang̃asalantà ang̃ mg̃a tao ni Solimán at maubos na ang̃ mg̃a punlô ay napipilan din. At nang̃ makuha ng̃ mg̃a kastilà ang̃ Maynilà ay sinalakay ang̃ bahay ni Solimán at dito'y nátagpuán nilá ang̃ isáng̃ mainam na gusali, maiinam na kasang̃kapang̃ sigay, mg̃a damit na mariring̃al na nagkakahalagá ng̃ may 23.000 piso. Hindî nagtaksíl kailán man si Solimán, gaya ng̃ ipinararatang̃ sa kanyá ng̃ mg̃a kastilà. Siyá'y tumupád lamáng̃ sa kanyáng̃ dakilang̃ katung̃kulan na makibaka sa sino mang̃ magnánasang̃ sumirà ng̃ kanyáng̃ kapuriháng̃ pagkaharì, at yáyamang̃ ang̃ mg̃a kastilà ay siyáng̃ nagpasimulâ ng̃ pagbabaka, ay siyá ay nagtang̃gól lamang̃ at natalo, ng̃uni't hindî kailán man nagtaksíl. Ang̃ kanyáng̃ pagibig sa sariling̃ Lupà ay nagudyók sa kanyáng̃ makibaka at siyá ay nakibaka dahil doón. Kung̃ saán mákikitang̃ ang pagguhò ng̃ kaharian ni Solimàn ay utang̃ sa kagahaman ng̃ isáng̃ lahing̃ mang̃aalipin; sa isáng̃ pámahalaáng̃ pinagágaláw ng̃ lakás ng̃ lakás at di ng̃ lakás ng̃ katuwiran. Kawawang̃ bayang̃ maliliít na linúlupig at ginágahasà ng̃ malalakíng bansâ. Ang̃ daigdíg ay patung̃o sa pagunlád, at buhat niyaóng̃ 1914 na gahasain ang̃ Belhika, ang malalakíng̃ Bansâ ay nagsasapì at ipinagtang̃gól ang̃ katwiran ng̃ maliliít na bayan. Panibagong̃ kilos sa daigdíg na bung̃a ng̃ mayamang̃ diwà ng̃ dakilang̃ Wilson sa kaamerikahan.   … [Read more...]

Book: Estudio de los antiguos alfabetos filipinos by Cipriano Marcilla y Martín (1895)

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Estudio de los antiguos alfabetos filipinos (1895) Author: Cipriano Marcilla y Martín Publisher: Tipo-litografia del asilo de huérfanos Year: 1895 Language: Spanish … [Read more...]