Through sponsorship by Senator Miguel Zubiri – Arnis Officially Declared National Martial Art and Sport, Dec. 11 2009,

Lameco Sulite-advanced-balisong www.mandirigma.org

UPDATE ON LAWS PASSED DURING THE 14th & 15th CONGRESS Researched by the Executive-Legislative Liaison Service LAWS OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE (15th CONGRESS)   RA 9850 AN ACT DECLARING ARNIS AS THE NATIONAL MARTIAL ART AND SPORT OF THE PHILIPPINES (SIGNED INTO LAW ON DECEMBER 11,  2009)   **********   The principal author and sponsor of RA 9850 is Senator Juan Miguel “Migz” F. Zubiri. He is a dedicated Martial Artist and Eskrimador. His primary teacher since childhood is Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts, founder of Bakbakan Philippines. System that he studied under Grandmaster Ricketts include Bakbakan Sagasa Kickboxing, Ngo Cho Kung Fu and Kali Ilustrisimo. Other teachers include Bakbakan Members Grandmaster Alex Co (Ngo Cho), Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite (Lameco Eskrima), Grandmaster Tony Diego (Kali Ilustrisimo) and Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo himself.   Miguel with some of his teachers and fellow Bakbakan members.   On the cover of the "Advanced Balisong" book with one of his teachers, Punong Guro Edgar Sulite. Senator Juan Miguel F. Zubiri In 2008, Senator Juan Miguel “Migz” F. Zubiri, at age 39, became the youngest to be elected as Senate Majority Leader since the First Congress in 1946. A veteran legislator, he served the 3rd District of Bukidnon from 1998 to 2007 and was always cited as one of the most outstanding solons in the House of Representatives. He has also maintained a perfect attendance in the Plenary Sessions for the last 12 years (4 Congresses) both as Congressman and as Senator, and including this 15th Congress. In the 14th Congress and during his stint as Senate Majority Leader, Sen. Zubiri helped steer the Senate to a record performance of around 650 bills enacted into laws. Sen. Migz is the principal author and sponsor of more than 20 major laws, both in the Senate and during his stint as Congressman. As a fervent advocate of clean energy, he worked for the passage of RA 9513 or the Renewable Energy Act of 2008 and RA 9367 or the Biofuels Act of 2006, earning him the moniker Mr. Clean Energy. Among the other laws he sponsored, principally authored or co-authored are:   RA10068 – Organic Agriculture Act of 2010; RA 9147 – Wildlife Conservation and Protection Act; RA 10121 – Philippine Disaster Risk Management Act; RA 9165 – Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002; RA 9679 – the Home Development Mutual Fund Law of 2009 (Pag-IBIG Fund); RA 9653 – the Rent Control Act of 2009; RA 9997 – the National Commission on Muslim Filipinos Act of 2009; RA 9996 – the Mindanao Development Authority Act of 2010; RA 9904 – the Magna Carta for Homeowners and Homeowners’ Associations; RA 9903 – Condonation of Penalties on Delinquent Social Security Contributions; RA 9507 – the Socialized and Low-Cost Housing Loan Condonation Program; RA 9850 – Declaring Arnis as the National Martial Art and Sport; RA 9500 – UP Charter Amendments; RA 9163 – National Service Training Program; RA 9166 – Armed Forces of the Philippines Rate Pay Base Increase Act; RA 10072 – the New Charter of the Philippine Red Cross; RA 9645 – Declaring July 27 of Every Year as Araw ng Iglesia Ni Cristo and as Special Working Holiday; and RA 9849 – Declaring Eidul Adha as a National Holiday. He is also considered the “father” of the New Cooperative Code being the principal sponsor and author of RA 9520 or the Philippine Cooperative Code of 2008. Sen. Migz is known as a champion of environmental concerns, an advocacy he pursues in the Senate and among his top legislative agenda. In the current 15th Congress, he chairs the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. He also chairs the Committee on Cooperatives and 3 Joint Congressional Oversight Committees such as the Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act; Joint Congressional Committee on Clean Air Act; and the Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on Cooperatives. He is also a member of 20 other Senate standing committees. Sen. Migz is involved in concrete environmental programs such as being the founder of the Philippine Deer Foundation, a deer conservation project, and as President of the Palawan-based Katala Foundation which protects endangered wildlife species and their habitats. A trained first aider and certified rescue diver, he is a Governor of the Philippine Red Cross and active member of the Red Cross Youth Committee and Concerned Divers of the Philippines. Senator Zubiri has published two books: the Philippine Cooperative Code of 2008, and Bukidnon: The Philippine Frontier. He is a graduate of Master’s in Environment and Natural Resources Management at the University of the Philippines Open University and Bachelor of Science in Agri-Business Management at the University of the Philippines in Los Baños. He has also … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma and LV Tactical Training presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 22, 2012

Kapisanang Mandirigma and LV Tactical Training presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 22, 2012 Kapisanang Mandirigma and LV Tactical Training presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 22, 2012

Kapisanang Mandirigma and LV Tactical Training presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar.Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 22, 2012  … [Read more...]

Movie: Supremo (2012), Andres Bonifacio as husband, brother, soldier and hero

supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas supremo movie 2012 katipunan pilipinas

http://youtu.be/oHQ34CKnkIM     About Andres Bonifacio's Biopic Description Andres Bonifacio as husband, brother, soldier and hero Release date August 2012 Genre Epic Drama Studio Alternative Vision Cinema and Strawdogs Studio Productions Plot outline Manila, year 1896. The cry for independence from the tyranny of Spain peals louder than ever. Andres Bonifacio, leader of the rebel movement the Katipunan, leads his men to war. Though ill-equipped and untried in the field of battle, the Katipuneros launch an offensive against a vastly superior Spanish military. What follows is a series of events that will test the nation's brave sons, and an aftermath that will separate the genuine patriots from mere participants. Starring Alfred Vargas, Mon Confiado, Nicco Manalo, Alex Vincent Medina, Edmon Romawac, Shielbert Manuel, Lehner Mendoza, Manu Respall, Jeff Fernandez, Banjo Romero, Alex Cabodil, Nica Naval and Hermie Concepcion Directed by Richard V. Somes Written By Jimmy Flores Produced by PM Vargas, Alfred Vargas, Riza Montelibano, Mai Montelibano and Ellen Ilagan   Supremo (2012) Full Trailer Director: Richard V. Somes Starring: Alfred Vargas Mon Confiado Hermie Concepcion Nicco Manalo Alex Vincent Medina Nica Naval Edmon Romawag Shielbert Manuel Lehner Mendoza Jeff Fernandez Banjo Romero Mano Respall Alex Cabodil Production Manager: Darryl De la Cruz Sound Engineer Jedd Chriss Dumaguina Musical Scorer: Von De Guzman Editors: Carlo Francisco Manatad + Joris Fernandez Director of Photography: Alex Espartero Production Designers: Erin John Martir + Adrian Torres Screenplay: Jimmy Flores Associate Producer: Ellen Ilagan + Maimai Montelibano Line Producer: Riza Montelibano Executive Producers: PM Vargas + Alfred Vargas   http://www.facebook.com/pages/Supremo/407515249292352     … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine article for Budo International, November 2011

dvd-lameco-eskrima-backyard-sulite-original-group www.mandirigma.org

Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine article for Budo International, November 2011 February 1, 2012 By dinof2 Leave a Comment (Edit) Guro Dino Flores DVD Release and Magazine  article for Budo International, November 2011     Excerpt from the DVD backcover: Punong Guro Edgar Sulite was one of the great revolutionaries in Philippine Martial Arts history. There were two types of students that learnt under him, those who took classes under him periodically and those whom he selected and prepared personally for becoming fighters in private training sessions in the backyard of his home, these students belonged to the Sulite Orihinal Group. Dino Flores belongs to this second elite group of specially trained fighters in Lameco and shines with his own light as one of the top selected fighters of the Lameco Eskrima backyard group. In this work he introduces and shows us a series of exercises which Punong Guro Sulite emphasized greatly upon and that develop correct distancing in a real combat situation. This dvd will help you refine the combative motions, enable you to increase the intensity within a drill, as well as show you how to use equipment correctly and help you overcome a well protected opponent. You will learn how to avoid being hit and grabbed. These exercises practiced under real contact and tension will allow you to react against the most common attacks in real time and in an effective way. The most important thing is to hit well, to have good footwork and mainly to have a great foundation. http://www.budointernational.net/arnis-kali-escrima/1564-dvd-lameco-eskrima-backyard-sulite-original-group.html     About Budo International Magazine Budo International is the only martial arts magazine published in seven different languages (English, Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, and Croatian) and sold worldwide. Budo Magazine is undisputedly the largest specialized magazine in over 60 countries. They are the foremost martial arts publication in Europe, South America, Central America and Australia, as well as having editions in Greece and Czechoslovakia.Their monthly publication brings exciting and exotic masters and material that is truly universal. Budo also covers all types of events, from tournaments to movies and the magazine brings a gust of fresh air mixed with European quality to the American culture. Click on the magazine image below to read English issues of Budo. http://www.budointernational.net/   http://youtu.be/_F-WsyfWAhs   Backyard Lameco DVD clip produced by Budo International … [Read more...]

Interview: Guro Dino Flores by Christof Froehlich, March 2012

solo-mandirigma-institute kali arnis escrima lameco solo-mandirigma-institute kali arnis escrima lameco

Interview: Guro Dino Flores by Christof Froehlich, March 2012 Q: Guro Dino, please introduce yourself. Guro Dino: I am Guro Dino Flores and I am a member of the organization Kapisanang Mandirigma. I was a member of the late Punong Guro Edgar Sulite’s Backyard Group, also known as the Lameco SOG (Sulite Orehenal Group). I am also a practitioner of Ilustrisimo taught primarily by the late Master Christopher Ricketts. — Q: How did you first start in the Warrior Arts of the Philippines? Guro Dino: I was first introduced to the existence of the Philippine Warrior Art in 1975 by my father. As a child, my father would tell me stories about the battles against the Spanish and Americans during the struggle for Philippine independence. Some of the stories he told were of his grandfather, Segundo Morato Flores, who was a Katipunero in the Bicol Province during the Philippine Revolution. His grandfather would proudly celebrate Philippine independence day by putting on his Katipunero uniform. He would dress my father in a matching outfit and wooden sword. Then with great pride they would march to the town square and meet with other veterans. Other stories involved my paternal grandfather, as a decorated Captain in the USAFFE (United States Armed Forces in the Far East). He was also a guerilla fighter after the Americans surrendered with the fall of the Philippines to Japan. On my mothers side, my grandfather fought on the Island Fortress of Corrigador as a staff sergeant in the USAFFE where he was in charge of a unit of 50 caliber water cooled machine guns. He survived the infamous Bataan “Death March” and numerous solo recon missions. One day during story time, my father showed me the sword my paternal grandfather used in World War II. It was in a leather scabbard and had a water buffalo horn handle (Kalabaw). He held it proudly over his head pointing to the sky telling me these swords were used in “Filipino Arnis”! He did a few fighting stances, and that was how the seeds of the Philippine Warrior Arts were first planted in me. My first instruction was in the early 80′s as a young teen in my mother’s province of Laguna, Philippines. I had bought my first Balisong knife and would practice with it constantly. The town of Balisong where the knife was invented was less than 30 miles away in my maternal grandmothers province of Batangas. Laguna was known for practitioners of the balisong knife and there was an abundance of these knives available at the traditioal outdoor market (Palenke). One day, I way fooling around with the knife in front of my uncles who were having a “Tagay” or loosely translated, a serious drinking session. They yelled at me that the balisong wasn’t a toy and that relatives have been seriously injured in knife encounters. One of their friends showed me his scar from a knife fight. This began my “informal lessons” in the knife arts. One of the first lessons was to “never brandish that thing unless you plan to use it”. When I moved to Los Angeles in the late 80′s, my cousins, Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores and I would train with each other. Our first “formal studies” in Eskrima were with Grandmaster Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis and Grandmaster Conrad Manaois in his family system of Ninoy Cinco Teros. — Q: Can you tell us some things about your training with Punong Guro Edgar Sulite & Master Christopher Ricketts. Guro Dino: They were both in love with the Philippine Warrior Arts. Both were very attentive and respectful of the proper form and function of the fundamental and original movements taught to them. From my first day to my last day of training with them, we always began with the basic foundations. They were both at the conclusion that real fighting must be kept simple. One of the primary things Punong Guro focused on with the Backyard Group was sparring at various levels of intensity. Frequently with live stick with full punching, kicking, elbows, knees, takedowns and grappling permitted. Even though he acknowledged that the sword was the soul of the art, he found sword techniques did not always work with a stick in these conditions, especially with headgear. It was an amazing learning opportunity for me. Master Ricketts’ primary focus became the perfection and preservation of the original ways Grandmaster Ilustrisimo actually moved with his sword. He constantly sought to master these techniques even further, and this is what he wanted me to perfect. When I first met Master Ricketts in the Philippines, within minutes I was sparring some of his senior students. He was a big believer in the importance of physical conditioning and sparring. It was an honor and privilege to train with these Grandmasters and I miss my friends dearly. I miss being their student. I will always do my best to conduct myself in a way that they would make them proud … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma and LV Tactical Training presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 29, 2012

backyard lameco guro dino guro ariel kali arnis escrima backyard lameco guro dino guro ariel kali arnis escrima

Seminar Series. Instructors: Guro Dino Flores & Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Date: July 29, 2012 Location: LV Tactical Training Facility 6366 W. Sahara Las Vegas, NV 89146 Time:  10:00am-3:00pm Cost:  $99.00 per person Contact:  Ariel Flores Mosses – email arielfmosses@yahoo.com http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/#!events About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Masters Bruce and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Masters Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts are now officially the head of the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts "Ilustrisimo" organization which strives to preserve the purity of the art. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego.Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino also cites the importance of his training partners in Lameco SOG and Kapisanang Mandirigma in his growth. After the passing of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, certain members of the Lameco Backyard group reformed also became know as Kapisanang Mandirigma. The group regularly continued  training, sparring, experimenting and seeking the deeper roots of their chosen arts. This group includes Guros Joel Adriatico, Hospecio “Bud” Balani Jr., Mar Elepaño, Choy Flores, Arnold Noche, Gary Quan, Hans Anton Tan and Pantaleon “Mang Leo” Revilles, Jr. (RIP). With frequent visits by Guro Lowell Pueblos, Guro Bong Hebia and honorary member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses. … [Read more...]

Master Joe Tan of Tapado/Vinas Eskrima to appear at Magda Institute Camp in California, July 4th – 7th, 2013

Master Joe Tan Seminar Kali Arnis Eskrima Vinas Tapado

Master Joe Tan of Tapado/Vinas Eskrima to appear at Magda Institute Camp, July 4th - 7th, 2013   … [Read more...]

Guro Balinado of Balinado Arnis-Kursada & Guro Roger Agbulos of Lameco Astig Combatives teamed up to showcase FMA self-defense and combatives at the FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS SUMMERCAMP IN GERMANY 2013

astig lameco

Guro Balinado of Balinado Arnis-Kursada & Guro Roger Agbulos of Lameco Astig Combatives teamed up to showcase FMA self-defense and combatives at the FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS SUMMERCAMP 2013. https://www.facebook.com/events/358303297612020/   … [Read more...]

Protected: Invitation Only, Private Ilustrisimo Seminar – NEW DATES – Los Angeles & Las Vegas

Antonio-Tatang-Ilustrisimo_Tony-Diego

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Film: Sisang Tabak – 1981

kali kali arnis arnis escrima escrima eskrima eskrima kali kali arnis arnis escrima escrima eskrima eskrima

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73mQS3CVoEw   Lots of Eskrima scenes. Mario (Orestes Ojeda) was forced by his mother, Dona Paula (Carmen Enriquez) to marry Lorna (Nyl Cavestany) and broke his intimate relationship with Sisa (Alma Moreno), a simple and poor girl was then pregnant with their child. Sisa gave birth to her child in the forest while being chased by Dona Paula's armed men. They were able to get her child and believed that she was already killed till they all witness her return and brave revenge as Sisang Tabak. Directed by Jose Miranda Cruz Alma Moreno Vic Vargas Dante Rivero Carmen Enriquez Orestes Ojeda Anna Gonzales … [Read more...]

Equipment

13626479_10206407883187198_9089580910213149058_n

EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE Prices Reflect Delivery Fee **********************************************************  ITEM: Eskrima Hand Protector originally made for Master Ricketts – Made in Luzon, Philippines            DESCRIPTION: Hand Crafted in Luzon, Philippines by Eskrimadors. Tough but lighter than other hand guards for more agility.  Perfect for sparring. Only two available.     PRICE: Price – $45.00     **********************************************************   ITEM: Eskrima Forearm Protector/Armour, originally made for Master Ricketts  – Luzon, Philippines       DESCRIPTION: Hand Crafted in Luzon, Philippines by Eskrimadors. Tough but lighter than other forearm guards for more agility.  Perfect for sparring.     PRICE: Price – $45.00 **********************************************************   ITEM: Rattan Sticks: DESCRIPTION: Carefully selected by Eskrimadors in Cebu, Philippines to ensure that they are combat or training tough. PRICE: Price – $35.00 Pair   *********************************************************     ITEM: Pinuti Training Sword     DESCRIPTION: This STEEL training sword PINUTI is very popular in the VISAYAN central Philippines, imported from the Cebu, Philippines and hand-made by the craftsmen. Each features a design of the most common blades used by the Filipino Martial Arts practitioners around the world.This training blade feels real except its dull unsharpened edge. Heavy-duty hand crafted practice sword is built to last a lifetime! It features a 21 inch with dull edge & rounded tip, and aluminum cached and wooden handles. Comes with faux leather case with belt loop.     PRICE: Price – $75.00 Each (Training Sword Only)            **********************************************************     ITEM: Steel Training Dagger     DESCRIPTION: imported from the Cebu, Philippines and  hand-made by the craftsmen. This training blade is dull, unsharpened edge. Heavy Duty Steel. Heavy-duty hand crafted practice knife is built to last a lifetime! Aluminum cached and wooden handles. Comes with faux leather case with belt loop.     PRICE: Price – $25 Each       **********************************************************   **********************************************************     ITEM: Genuine Mini Classic Balisong     DESCRIPTION: Mini Balisongs. Hand Crafted in Barangay Balisong – the birthplace of the Balisong blade. Pure brass or Brass with wood inlay. Only 12 pieces available.     PRICE: Price – $20.00 Each       **********************************************************     ITEM: Genuine Balisong Comb     DESCRIPTION:  Awesome Balisong Comb. Handmade in Barangay Balisong. Rare and difficult to find Kamagong or Bahi wood Inlay. Very cool piece. $50 Stainless steel functional comb. only 3 pieces available.     PRICE: Price – $25.00 Each       **********************************************************     ITEM: Padded Sticks from Northern Luzon     DESCRIPTION:  Padded Sticks Imported from Luzon Philippines. Light Live Rattan stick core perfect for training. Only 6 available.     PRICE: Price – $29.00 Each,  Pair - $50.00     ********************************************************** **********************************************************     ITEM: T-Shirt – Kapisanang Mandirigma     DESCRIPTION: T-Shirt. Black with white print.     PRICE: Price – $25.00     **********************************************************   **********************************************************       ITEM: Patch – Kapisanang Mandirigma Patch     DESCRIPTION: Kapisanang Mandirigma Patch. Black and White.         PRICE: Price – $15.00   **********************************************************     **********************************************************         ITEM: Patch – Kapisanang Mandirigma Backyard Fighting Method  Patch. Represents the Sparring/Contact aspect of the art. Training type reserved for members.     DESCRIPTION: Kapisanang Mandirigma Backyard Fighting Method  Patch. Black and … [Read more...]

The FMA Informative has a Newspaper with information for the Filipino martial arts community, short stories, introductions of practitioners or styles, theories and/or technical aspects, short write ups on a past event etc, pertinent to the Filipino martial arts and the culture of the Philippine.

http://www.fmainformative.info/ http://www.fmainformative.info/

  The FMA Informative has a Newspaper with information for the Filipino martial arts community, short stories, introductions of practitioners or styles, theories and/or technical aspects, short write ups on a past event etc, pertinent to the Filipino martial arts and the culture of the Philippine. The FMA Informative also has an Online Magazine which each issue is dedicated to a subject such as certain aspects of a style, historical, theoretical and technical aspects, reflections, and other related subjects, also the culture of the Philippines etc... Both can be subscribed to for Free. The ideas and opinions expressed in the FMA Informative newspaper or online magazine are those of the authors of the articles or practitioners being interviewed and are not necessarily the views of the FMA Informative.   For more information go to their website: http://www.fmainformative.info/   Join FMA Informative on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/FMA-Informative/205930022842825 … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan Sendong Flood Victims Benefit Seminar, April 29th, 2012

master nene gaabucayan nng balintawak arnis eskrima master nene gaabucayan nng balintawak arnis eskrima

  About Grandmaster Nonato "Nene" Gaabucayan "Standing at 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighting no more that 120 pounds, Venancio "Anciong" Bacon was a very unassuming man. He was a veteran of a great many "death" matches in Cebu. Described by many of his students as lightning fast, Venancio Bacon maneuvered through a fight smoothly while exploiting his opponents’ balance and coordination. He was known to be very surgical with a stick, able to employ varying force to his exact targets throughout his adversary’s body. But, his greatest virtue and asset was his constant desire to innovate and improve his art, diligently discovering techniques through the years, never ceasing in this path. He taught his art to those who desired to learn it." At age 16, Nonato "Nene" Gaabucayan was introduced to Venancio "Anciong" Bacon's BALINTAWAK. In early 1976, "Nene" Gaabucayan moved to Cebu City from Cagayan de Oro to attend college. He lived in a boarding house owned by "Ben" Marapao in Urgello area. Upon learning that Nene was interested in continuing his Karate training, Dr. Marapao suggested he take up Eskrima. Nene attended one training session, in which he was given a demonstration by Teofilo Velez. He'd never seen anything like it, since then he had always been a loyal student and teacher of BALINTAWAK. Along with Teofilo Velez, Nene trained with Bobby Taboada, Chito Velez, Monnie Velez, Eddie Velez, Romeo de la Rosa, and Hector Rizzari. Training was hard, and he made a point to be there every day. Like a sponge, everybody poured whatever Balintawak knowledge they had to this very eager 16 year old. In return, he learned from them. At 18, Nene began teaching his own crop of students in Lapu-Lapu City. He divided his time between his studies at the Philippine Air Force College of Aeronautics and the YMCA in Lapu-Lapu. The photo below are some of his students, from left to right is Nonoy Patalinghug, Boy Booc (judo instructor), Nene, Dr. Marapao, Tonying Patalinghug, Fred Baguio, seated wearing a gi is Boy Baguio (karate instructor), seated wearing a jean jacket is Conrado "Condring" Ybanez (nephew of Tinong Ybanez). After completing his studies in Cebu, Nene returned to Cagayan de Oro. As one of Teofilo Velez' master instructors, he carried the Gold Chapter of Teovel Balintawak. He continued to teach Balintawak. In 1987, Nene traveled to Germany and later to Switzerland to teach BALINTAWAK. He stayed in Europe for 3 years, then returned to Cagayan de Oro. Nene has been teaching BALINTAWAK for 35 years.   For more information: http://www.nngbalintawak.com/index.html http://www.facebook.com/events/119784368151790/?notif_t=plan_edited … [Read more...]

The Origins of Philippines Boxing, 1899-1929

Pancho Villa by Ed Hughes1925 filipino boxing Pancho Villa by Ed Hughes1925 filipino boxing

The Origins of Philippines Boxing, 1899-1929   By Joseph R. Svinth Copyright © Joseph R. Svinth 2001. All rights reserved. The assistance of Pat Baptiste, Hank Kaplan, Paul Lou, Eric Madis, Curtis Narimatsu, John Ochs,  Michael Machado, and Kevin Smith is gratefully acknowledged. On June 18, 1923, Francisco "Pancho Villa" Guilledo beat Jimmy Wilde to become the world flyweight boxing champion, an accomplishment that was (and remains) a matter of great pride to people of Filipino descent. Unfortunately, while there has been some documentation of the many excellent Filipino boxers who subsequently followed Guilledo to the United States, there has not been as much attention paid to documenting the origins of boxing in the Philippines. This article represents a step toward correcting that omission. People with additional information or corrections are invited to contact the author at jsvinth@ejmas.com. "Pancho Villa, gone but not forgotten." Illustration by Ed Hughes, 1925. Boxing Enters the Philippines US servicemen introduced boxing to the Philippines during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. How this came about is that on April 25, 1898, the United States declared war on Spain, whose colonial holdings included the Philippines. So, on April 27, 1898, Commodore George Dewey ordered his squadron of five cruisers and two gunboats to steam from China to the Philippines, and there, on May 1, 1898, he issued the famous command, "You may fire when ready, Gridley." The resulting US naval victory effectively ended Spanish control of the region, and in August 1898 the US Army began the occupation of Luzon. Then, to the horror of the Filipinos, the Americans did not cede the Philippines to them: instead they decided to keep the islands for themselves. Between 1899 and 1913, this resulted in savage wars of peace whose heroes included Emilio Aguinaldo on one side and Arthur MacArthur, Frederick Funston, Leonard Wood, and John J. Pershing on the other. Casualties in these battles were heavy and one-sided: US casualties were listed as 4,243 killed and 2,818 wounded in action while Filipino casualties are estimated at 16,000 killed, plus another several hundred thousand dead from famine or disease (generally cholera). However, after Theodore Roosevelt’s unilateral declaration of victory in July 1902, US commanders began thinking about how to reduce the rates of desertion, suicide, sexually transmitted diseases, drug abuse, and drunkenness among their soldiers and sailors. Boxing was offered as a potential solution. The reason was that boxers in training were taught to avoid tobacco, alcohol, and sexual activity. Furthermore, explained writer Charles L. Clay in 1887, "Boxing also makes a man self-reliant and resourceful when assailed by sudden or unexpected dangers or difficulties." This, in turn, said a YMCA director named C.H. Jackson in 1909, made young men "Christlike and manly." So, in 1902, Major Elijah Halford (a former secretary to President Benjamin Harrison) asked philanthropists for $200,000 to construct a YMCA in Manila, and by 1904, Army officers such as Edmund Butts were extolling the virtues of boxing in tropical environments such as Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. US Military Boxers On November 18, 1899, soldiers of the 11th US Cavalry reported finding a pair of boxing gloves made by Sol Levinson of San Francisco abandoned in the Luzon village of San Mateo. According to Damon Runyon, writing in October 1925, Filipino prisoners reported that the "gloves had been brought in by a renegade soldier from the negro Twenty-fourth Infantry, and that he had been schooling the Filipinos in their use." Many early boxers in the Philippines were African American, as the all-black 9th and 10th US Cavalry, 24th and 25th US Infantry, and 48th and 49th US Volunteer Infantry formed a significant percentage of the American soldiers serving in the Philippines between 1899 and 1902. Following Roosevelt’s declaration of peace, most of the black troops were sent back to the United States but in 1913, the 25th was in Hawaii. There the Honolulu Advertiser noted: The Twenty-fifth is proud of its colored ringmasters and particularly of Hollie Giles, a welterweight of 155 pounds, who is described by the men as a ‘whirlwind’ fighter; Morgan, a heavyweight at 190 pounds; Carson, a light heavyweight, and Ananias Harris, a light heavyweight. Meanwhile, from 1913 until 1917, the 24th was in the Philippines, serving at Camp McGrath (Batangas) and Fort Mills (Corregidor). Noted African American fighters from this period included the middleweights Joe Blackburn, "Craps" Johnson, and "Demon" White. Of course, there were also white soldiers who boxed in the Philippines. The most famous was New Jersey’s Mike Ballerino. "Ballerino had a chip on his shoulder," Pancho Villa recalled in early 1925. "He dared any of the Filipinos to knock it off." So Pancho Villa did, … [Read more...]

Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano

Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano Rapid Journal Vol. 2, No. 4 4th Qtr 1997Taichi Works Publications 458 Jaboneros St. Binondo, Manila 1006 Arnis: A Question of Origins by Bot Jocano The term arnis evokes a number of reactions from people every time it is mentioned in a conversation. Some people start fanning their hands in the air, imitating the distinctive movements of the two-stick (doble baston) training method. This image of arnis is one of the most popular to the layman. A second reaction, and quite as common as the first, is the question: "Saan ba talaga galing ang arnis?" (Where did arnis really come from?) Alternatively, "Di ba, sa atin nanggaling ang arnis?î (Isn't it that arnis comes from us?) is a question also heard. This article is an attempt to critically examine the roots of one of the martial arts of the Philippines, arnis. It must be noted that in no way does this article claim to be the final say on the origins of arnis. It is actually a preliminary look, a start if you will, into re-examining carefully the origins of an art form. Arnis, also known as kali, escrima, baston, etc. is a complete martial art system, encompassing weapons training and empty-hand self-defense. It includes training in single stick techniques (solo baston), double stick techniques (doble baston), stick and knife or dagger techniques (espada y daga) and knife techniques (daga). Some styles may include staff and spear (sibat) training in their curriculum. Others will include the practice of medium to long bladed weapons (bolo) in their repertoire. Many styles have some form of empty hand combat, encompassing striking, kicking, locking, throwing and even choking methods. These are usually taught when the practitioner has demonstrated a reasonable degree of proficiency with the weapons of his style of arnis. Different arnis styles, from different parts of the country, may emphasize different areas of the training methods noted above. The term arnis is believed to be a Tagalog corruption of the Spanish term arnes, or harness, a reference to the decorations worn by the early Filipinos. Kali is another term used to refer to the same kind of martial arts. Different provinces may have different names for arnis, such as baston and kaliradman (Ilonggo, Bisaya), pagkalikali (Ibanag) and kalirongan (Pangasinan). These are only a few examples of the terms already recorded in different sources. With such a comprehensive system of martial arts being taught and promoted in different areas of the country, it is inevitable that people would ask, where did such a complete martial art system come from? One suggestion is that it originally came from another martial art system, called tjakalele. This is actually the name of a branch of the Indonesian martial art system known as pentjak silat. Another suggestion is that it was brought here from the Southeast Asian mainland, particularly during the Madjapahit and Shri-Visayan empires. Yet another suggestion is that it was propagated by the so-called ten Bornean datus fleeing persecution from their homeland. We shall critically examine these assertions one at a time. The idea that arnis evolved or was derived from another martial art system, namely tjakalele silat, is due to linguistics. The alternative name for arnis is kali. It is widely held that this is the older term for arnis, and that kali itself emphasizes bladed weaponry apart from practice with the stick. It is not surprising that a connection could be seen between the term kali and tjakalele. However, linguistic similarity alone is not enough ground to assert that kali was indeed derived from tjakalele. There has to be documented proof that one came from the other. What form should this proof take? Authenticated documents certainly are one of the best pieces of evidence - if such could be found, and proven to be genuine. A close and thorough comparison of both styles would help, but it must be remembered that they would have changed over time, reflecting the different changes that have happened in their cultures of origin. On the other hand, one of the local terms for a bladed weapon is kalis. It is also believed that kali is a derived term from kalis. This assertion will require study before it can be validated. Another oft-quoted idea is that kali was brought here during the Shri-Vishayan (7th -14th centuries and Madjapahit (13th -16th centuries) empires. This reflects the notion that the Philippines then was somehow an integral part of both empires. It must be noted that the archaeological evidence for the role of the Philippines in both empires is very meager. About the best that could be said is that there was commercial contact, but whether such contact also included the spreading of martial arts is circumstantial at best. A third idea regarding the spreading and propagation of kali in the Philippines is that ten Bornean datus (sometimes nine) fled here and settled in various parts of … [Read more...]

The History of Tapado by Master Joe Tan

Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas Lapu Lapu Arnis Vinas

History of Tapado Tapado is an Original Filipino Martial Art which came from a Hiligaynon (a Filipino dialect) word ‘Tapat’ or ‘Tapos’ which means – finished or done in english or to finish the job in one strike. This art was founded in 1960 by the late Grandmaster Romeo ‘Nono’ Mamar of Taloc, Bago City, Negros Occidental, Philippines. ‘Nono’ as he was fondly called, was an accomplished stickfighter specializing in lagas, sinamak and oido arnis systems. But despite his proficiencies in these various arts of arnis/kali/escrima, he found them wanting because according to his actual experiences during matches among his peers, he could still be hit by his opponent. As in a boxing match..where even the champion could still be pummeled despite his experiences, training and exposures, Nono didn’t like the idea of taking hits at all. So after experiencing these various hits and a few times, even defeats, he decided to take a break from stickfighting for a couple of years. But due to his undying love of this art, he continued his personal search along the line of other arts in relations to stickfighting. He noticed that a sword with its longer length has an advantage of reach and power. And so this prompted him to experiment with longer sticks of various sizes and length. After his rigid testing and re testing, he finally settled for a longer stick 43 to 47 inches long. The length is based on the height of the person. But then again, he started thinking : what if the opponent has the same size and length of stick.too?. Thru persistent research and self discovery, he came up with the solutions. He developed various unseen hand, wrist, arm, shoulder and body movements, that jibed with the law of Physics, that generated a lot of power to his strikes and always resulted in overpowering all incoming strikes. Not content to just the overpowering strike, Nono wanted to add a simultaneous offensive hit at the same time thereby rendering the opponent incapacitated with just one powerful and speedy blow. And thus the birth of Tapado. Tapado ,in its early inception, was secretly propagated and practiced only by relatives and family members of the clan. There was an early Tapado Association formed in 1980 but it was still limited and exclusive for members of the family , close relatives and associates. In 1983, Tapado was formally organized and introduced to the public. When the founder died on February 15, 2005, the leadership of the original tapado organization was handed down to his nephew GM Benefredo ‘Bebing’ Lobrido . It took on the official name of Original Filipino Tapado Longstick Fighting Association. Inc. Another Tapado group was set up under GM Mike F. Vasquez, the founder of Vasquez Modified Martial Art International. An undefeated heavy weight Karate champion of the Philippines , a Master Arnis practicioner and a top tapado student of Nono Mumar. GM Mike introduced modifications in the tapado system and called it MODIFIED TAPADO. GM Mike had discussed his ideas of modifications with the original founder while he was alive and was given the authority to do so. The author Master Jose Valencia Tan, has the privilege of having studied under both Grandmasters, GM Nono Mumar and GM Mike Vasquez and including GM Lobrido (when the latter was the Chief Instructor of Original Tapado ). The author is recognized and Certified as Master of Tapado by both Organizations. Currently, Master Joe is propagating Tapado in the US and is an authorized Sole representative of Modified Tapado Organization in the State of California. Photos Master Joe Tan w/ GM Jose Vinas (Founder of Lapu Lapu Vinas Arnis Afficionado) JTan in yellow w/black stripe polo shirt. Master Tan w/ GM Nono Mamar (Founder of Original Tapado Arnis Organization) Grandmaster Jose Vinas - Founder of Lapu Lapu Vinas Arnis Afficianado and Teacher of Master Joe Tan in Arnis. Grandmaster Nono Mamar and Grandmaster Mike Vasquez Master Joe Tan w/ GM Bebing Lobrido (Inhiritor of Original Tapado) Master Joe Tan w/ GM Mike Vasquez (Founder of Modified Tapado) Vasquez Modified Martial Arts Copyright © by MasterTapadoArnis.com | Design Copyright © by E. Kelly … [Read more...]

Giving the Right Credits 
By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite

arnis lameco escrima eskrima kali Sulite arnis lameco escrima eskrima kali Sulite

  Giving the Right Credits 
By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite This article was first published in VORTEX (Volume 4, Number 1) in 1995. A quarterly 
newsletter of Lameco Eskrima International, the publisher was the late Punong Guro 
Edgar G. Sulite who passed away on April 10, 1997. The editor was Arnold A. Noche.   Giving the Right Credits By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite   In today’s society, martial arts practitioners are constantly bombarded by the 
knowledge and techniques of various martial arts arriving from all four corners of the 
world. These are the same exact techniques that were once forbidden to be taught outside 
the family circle by the very same people who created it and used it. Those people 
dedicated their lives in the laboratory of the battlefield just to experiment whether their 
techniques would work or not. Many lives had been wasted before the techniques were 
ever refined. The masters from the different martial arts devoted their time, energy and, 
above all, their life in the development of their fierce combat techniques. 
The Filipino martial arts (Eskrima, Kali, Arnis), Kung-Fu, Thai Boxing, Karate, 
Indonesian Silat, Jiu-Jitsu, Western Boxing, Tai-Chi, Judo, Savate and other martial arts 
are just a mere phone call away. In our generation today, we are extremely fortunate to 
have these different types of martial arts available within our grasp. I remember Grandmaster Jose D. Caballero who was my teacher in the De Campo 
Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal System. It took me more than one year to court him, bringing him 
food each day on every visit as a means of a gift, just for him to accept me as a student. It 
was primarily because I was an outsider, one who didn’t belong to their family, that I was 
not accepted right away. It was also because of my perseverance, that I never stopped 
coming to his house to ask him to teach me, that I was finally accepted to become one of 
his disciples. Nowadays, you can study any and all kinds of martial arts as you wish, because 
they are available within your reach, for as long as you have the determination to learn. 
Due to the abundance of these martial arts that we study, we somehow consciously or 
subconsciously mix it together as one. This bring us now to the big problem that evolves 
due to the fact that some martial arts teachers, as well as some students, are not honest 
enough in giving the right credits to where they have gotten the knowledge from or where 
they have attained the techniques from. One afternoon in Manila, Philippines, during our Sunday sessions with 
Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo in Luneta Park, we noticed two bystanders carefully 
observing our training with extremely watchful eyes. I, being one of the spokesmen of the 
Kali Ilustrisimo System, approached the two men and asked them if they knew Eskrima, 
Kali or Arnis. I also asked them if they would show us some of their moves. The 
demonstration that they performed for us was quite impressive. Grandmaster Ilustrisimo, 
who does not impress easily at all especially if you are from another style of Kali, was 
astounded. After their demonstration we asked immediately who their teacher was. One 
of the young men replied that they did not have a teacher that they just went to the 
mountains and meditated to formulate the techniques, which they had just performed. We did not believe him nor them. Master Tony Diego said to me that it was such a pity to 
their teacher, whoever it was, that these two men would turn out to be so disrespectful. 
Less than a year later, during our meeting with the different grandmasters of Arnis 
Philippines, I met an old master that demonstrated the same techniques that I saw earlier 
from the two men. When I asked the master if he knew of the two, he replied that they 
were his students. The truth will always come out. Giving the right credits to where we have learned 
the techniques from pays a lot of respect to the people who invented it and devoted their 
life in battle just to prove that it works. It is their pride that their names are being 
remembered and honored by us who are now practicing or who have practiced their once 
called forbidden art. … [Read more...]

‘Arnis’ on Philippine Stamps

arnis_ss-1

  ‘Arnis’ can now be seen on Philippine stamps QUEZON CITY, METRO MANILA- The Philippine Postal Corporation (PhilPost) recently released stamps featuring ‘arnis,’ a Filipino martial arts and the country’s national sport. This is part of efforts to promote the sport throughout the world, the PhilPost said. The special ‘arnis’ stamps capture the unique movement and artistry of this Filipino sport, said PhilPost Postage and Philatelic department manager Lenie San Diego. … [Read more...]

Warrior’s Helmet (Oklop), Ifugao, 19th-early 20th c., National Gallery of Australia.

mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Warrior’s Helmet (Oklop), Ifugao, 19th-early 20th c., National Gallery of Australia.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Helmet, Masbate, 19th c., Museo Nacional de Antropología, Madrid.

7 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Helmet, Masbate, 19th c., Museo Nacional de Antropología, Madrid.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Shield, Bagobo, c 1900-1910, Penn Museum.

6 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 6 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

Shield, Bagobo, c 1900-1910, Penn Museum.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Justiniano Asuncion, “A Guardia de Vino: An Officer to Look After the Government Monopolies, Such as Arrack and Tobacco,” c 1841, New York Public Library.

5 4 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 5 4 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 5

  Justiniano Asuncion, “A Guardia de Vino: An Officer to Look After the Government Monopolies, Such as Arrack and Tobacco,” c 1841, New York Public Library.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Dagger Hilt, Butuan, 10th-13th c., Tony and Cecile Gutierrez Collection.

4 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 4 4 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 4

Dagger Hilt, Butuan, 10th-13th c., Tony and Cecile Gutierrez Collection.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Joseph Montano, “Moros-Moros au Théâtre d’Albay,” 1886.

mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 3 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 3

Joseph Montano, “Moros-Moros au Théâtre d’Albay,” 1886.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Body Armor, Lanao del Sur, late 19th-early 20th c., British Museum.

mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 2 mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao 2

Body Armor, Lanao del Sur, late 19th-early 20th c., British Museum.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

“Comisión encargada por el Sultán de Joló de visitar al Capitán General de las Islas Filipinas,” La Ilustración Española y Americana,” 1879.

mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao mandirigma kali arnis eskrima luzon visayas mindanao

“Comisión encargada por el Sultán de Joló de visitar al Capitán General de las Islas Filipinas,” La Ilustración Española y Americana,” 1879.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

U.S. Army 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments training in California during World War II.

10600663_10205291801962660_5087962132271676801_n

U.S. Army 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments training in California during World War II.   http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675053496_Filipino-Infantry_recreational-activities_bolo-knives_Colonel-Robert-Offley   … [Read more...]

A French Documentary about Arnis in the 1950′s

A French Documentary about Arnis in the 1950's http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZg2i6Yq9rc … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma Member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012

kali arnis eskrima

Kapisanang Mandirigma Member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach at Jeff Speakman's 5.0 Fighter Event Kapisanang Mandirigma Member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach at Jeff Speakman's 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 - 2012     Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012. . http://mandirigma.org/?p=1537 To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeyr9T6qD34 … [Read more...]

Bladed Weapons, Mindanao, 19th c., Museo Nacional De Antropología, Madrid.

Bladed Weapons, Mindanao, 19th c., Museo Nacional De Antropología, Madrid.

Bladed Weapons, Mindanao, 19th c., Museo Nacional De Antropología, Madrid.   Courtesy of http://pupuplatter.tumblr.com … [Read more...]

Kalis Ilustrisimo Headquarters aid for Grandmaster Tony Diego

GM Ilustrisimo Diego

To all our Kalis Ilustrisimo brothers and sisters, On the morning of February 24, 2012 a fire raged through a small community in Manila. Many houses were razed to the ground leaving families homeless. We received sad news that the home of Master Tony Diego was among those houses that didn't survive the fire. Absolutely none of their possessions were saved except the clothes on their backs. Master Tony and family are alive and safe but in dire need of assistance. Since the fire, they have been given temporary shelter at the local community center. We would like to solicit the immediate help of our brothers and sisters in Kalis Ilustrisimo and other kind souls to send aid for Master Tony and his family. Since Master Tony has no home at the moment, donations in kind may pose a problem. Instead, cash donations would be preferred and much appreciated. All parties who would like to make a donation are requested to send us a private message on our facebook page or email us at kalis.ilustrisimo.hq@gmail.com so that we can make arrangements to receive your donation. Thank you! Kalis Ilustrisimo Headquarters … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses

ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/ lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/ lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org lameco ariel mosses kali arnis eskrima manaois lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org

Guro Ariel with Grandmaster Manois in Washington State, 1998  Guro Ariel Flores Mosses: About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012. . http://mandirigma.org/?p=1537 To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://combatfma.com/index.html http://www.lvtacticaltraining.com/     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeyr9T6qD34   Grandmaster Manois Tournament and Official at FACLA Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles, 2000     Guro Ariel with student at his school Washington State, Guro Ariel, Guro Dino, Grandmaster Conrad Manaois and daughter, Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles, 1998     Guro Ariel Flores Mosses, Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Choy Flores, Guro Dino Flores in Washington State Guro Ariel Flores Mosses with Master Ricketts in Washington State Guro Ariel Flores Mosses with Master Ricketts, Maste Galang, Master Dodong in Washington State Guro Ariel and Guro Dino being filmed by student Ron Gabriel. Location in the backyard of Guro Ariel's Mothers house in Los Angeles, 2000 Guro Ariels Lameco I.D. Number one for Washington State and Lameco Representative. 1995 … [Read more...]

Lameco Eskrima & Kali Ilustrisimo – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores/USA presented by Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany

fma filipino martial arts fma filipino martial arts fma filipino martial arts fma filipino martial arts

Lameco Eskrima & Kali Ilustrisimo – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores/USA presented by Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany Lameco Eskrima & Kali Ilustrisimo – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores/USA presented by Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany sponsored by JuWe-Sticks Nach der überwältigenden Resonanz nach dem letzten Kurzbesuch von Guro Dino freuen wir uns Ihn in 2012 für einen längeren Aufenthalt gewinnen zu können. Das Seminar bildet die Grundlage für ein tieferes Verständnis des Kali Ilustrisimo (CNR) und des Lameco Eskrima (SOG) sowie den Start von Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany. Thema wird sein: Kali Ilustrisimo (Single & Double Blade) – Lameco Eskrima (Single & Double Stick) Laßt euch die Gelegenheit Kali Ilustrisimo von einem der wenigen zertifizierten Instruktoren unter Master Christopher Ricketts sowie Punong Guro Edgar. G. Sulite zu lernen nicht entgehen. KOSTEN: 1 Tag 55€ – 2 Tage 100€ bei Zahlung vor 13.04.2012, danach plus 10€ Nachmeldegebühr Seminarort wird noch bekanntgegeben, voraussichtlich Frankfurt/Main. Bei Nichterscheinen verfällt die bereits gezahlte Seminargebühr. Der Veranstalter übernimmt für Personen- und Sachschäden keinerlei Haftung. Die Teilnahme erfolgt auf eigenes Risiko! … [Read more...]

The first written account of “KALI” as the pre-Hispanic name of the Filipino Martial Arts by FMA History Redux

The first written account of "KALI" as the pre-Hispanic name of the Filipino Martial Arts Source: http://fmahistoryredux.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-first-written-account-of-kali-as.html?spref=fb http://fmahistoryredux.blogspot.com/2014/11/philippine-hero-rev-fr-gregorio-aglipay.html “Mga Karunungan sa Larong Arnis” by Placido Yambao and Buenaventura Mirafuente, University of the Philippines Press, 1957... the first book on the Filipino Martial Arts that we know now... its section on the history of the Filipino Martial Arts stated that when the Spaniards arrived in the Philippines, Filipino Martial Arts was not yet called "ARNIS" but "KALI" (“Ang KALI na dinatnan ng mga Kastila ay hindi pa ARNIS ang tawag noong 1610")... The book also mentioned that a KALI demonstration was once performed in honor of the newly-arrived Conquistador Miguel Lopez de Legazpi on the order of a tribal leader in the Island of Leyte...     Philippine Hero Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay, the source of Yambao & Mirafuente's "KALI"...   REV. FR. GREGORIO AGLIPAY, 1860-1940 (center), the first Supreme Bishop of the Philippine Independent Church (Wikipedia photo)...Rev. Fr. Aglipay was the source of the information that the original name of the Filipino Martial Arts is KALI in the book “Mga Karunungan sa Larong Arnis” authored by Placido Yambao and Buenaventura Mirafuente (University of the Philippines Press, 1957):'Ang KALI na Dinatnan ng mga Kastila ay Hindi pa Arnis ang Tawag nuong 1610.... Noong unang panahon ang larong ito'y kilala sa tawag na "KALI" ng ating mga ninuno, nguni't sa hindi maiwasang pagbabago ng panahon at pangyayari (underscoring mine) ay pinamagatan nila ng "Panandata" sa Tagalog, "Pagkalikali" sa kapatagan ng Kagayan ng mga Ibanag, "Kalirongan" sa Pangasinan, "Kaliradman" sa Bisaya at "Pagaradman" sa Ilongo nuong 1860, at "Didya" sa Ilokos at muling naging "Kabaroan," ayon kay Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay na bantog din sa arnis nuong 1872.'TRANSLATION: 'The indigenous martial art that the Spanish encountered in 1610 was not yet called Arnis at that time. During those times, this martial art was known as "KALI" to our ancestors.  Due to theunavoidable changing of the times and circumstances (underscoring mine), this martial art became known as "Panandata" to the Tagalogs, "Pagkalikali" to the Ibanags of the plains of Cagayan, "Kalirongan" to the people of Pangasinan, "Kaliradman" to the Visayans, "Pagaradman" to the Ilonggos in 1860, and "Didya" to the Ilocanos (but later on changed to "Kabaroan").  This is according to Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay, who himself was a famous Arnis practitioner in 1872.' … [Read more...]

Indigenous peoples of the Philippines

kali arnis eskrima escrima lameco sulite mandirigma.org

Indigenous peoples of the Philippines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The indigenous peoples of the Philippines consist of a large number of indigenous ethnic groups living in the country. They are the descendants of the original inhabitants of the Philippines who have managed to resist centuries of Spanish and United States colonization and in the process have retained their customs and traditions.[1] In the 1990s, there were more than 100 highland tribal groups constituted approximately 3% of the population. The upland tribal groups were a blend in ethnic origin like other lowland Filipinos, although they did not have contact with the outside world. They displayed a variety of social organization, cultural expression and artistic skills. They showed a high degree of creativity, usually employed to embellish utilitarian objects, such as bowls, baskets, clothing, weapons and spoons. These groups ranged from various Igorot tribes, a group that includes the Bontoc, Ibaloi, Ifugao, Isneg, Kalinga and Kankana-ey, who built the Rice Terraces. They also covered a wide spectrum in terms of their integration and acculturation with lowland Christian and Muslim Filipinos. Native groups such as the Bukidnon in Mindanao, had intermarried with lowlanders for almost a century. Other groups such as the Kalinga in Luzon have remained isolated from lowland influence. There were several indigenous groups living in the Cordillera Central of Luzon in 1990. At one time it was employed by lowland Filipinos in a pejorative sense, but in recent years it came to be used with pride by native groups in the mountain region as a positive expression of their ethnic identity. The Ifugaos of Ifugao Province, the Bontocs, Kalinga, Tinguian, the Kankana-ey and Ibaloi were all farmers who constructed the rice terraces for many centuries. Other mountain peoples of Luzon are the Isnegs of northern Kalinga-Apayao Province, the Gaddangs of the border between Kalinga-Apayao, and Isabela provinces and the Ilongots of Nueva Vizcaya Province and Caraballo Mountains all developed hunting and gathering, farming cultivation and headhunting. Other indigenous people such as the Negritos formerly dominated the highlands throughout the islands for thousands of years, but have been reduced to a small population, living in widely scattered locations, primarily along the eastern ranges of the mountains. In the southern Philippines, upland and lowland tribal groups were concentrated on Mindanao and western Visayas, although there are several indigenous groups such as the Mangyan living in Mindoro. Among the most important groups found on Mindanao are collectively called the Lumad, and includes the Manobo, Bukidnon of Bukidnon Province, Bagobo, Mandaya, and Mansaka, who inhabited the mountains bordering the Davao Gulf; the Subanon of upland areas in the Zamboanga; the Mamanua in the Agusan-Surigao border region; the Bila-an, Tiruray and Tboli in the region of the Cotabato province, and the Samal and Bajau in the Sulu Archipelago. The tribal groups of the Philippines are known for their carved wooden figures, baskets, weaving, pottery and weapons. Reservation The Philippine government succeeded in establishing a number of protected reservations for tribal groups. Indigenous people were expected to speak their native language, dress in their traditional tribal clothing, live in houses constructed of natural materials using traditional architectural designs and celebrate their traditional ceremonies of propitiation of spirits believed to be inhabiting their environment. They are also encouraged to re-establish their traditional authority structure in which, as in indigenous society were governed by chieftains known as Rajah and Datu. Contact between "primitive" and "modern" ethnic groups usually resulted in weakening or destroying tribal culture without assimilating the indigenous groups into modern society. It seemed doubtful that the shift of the Philippine government policy from assimilation to cultural pluralism could reverse the process. Several Filipino tribes tends to lead to the abandonment of traditional culture because land security makes it easier for tribal members to adopt the economic process of the larger society and facilitates marriage with outsiders. In the past, the Philippine government bureaus could not preserve tribes as social museum exhibits, but with the aid of various nationwide organizations, they hoped to help the tribes adapt to modern society without completely losing their ethnic identity.   … [Read more...]

A timeline of Indochina and Indonesia by Piero Scaruffi, 206 BC – Jan 2012 – Copyright © 2011 Piero Scaruffi All rights reserved.

A timeline of Indochina and Indonesia by Piero Scaruffi http://www.scaruffi.com/politics/indochin.html 206 BC: the kingdom of the Nam Viet dynasty extends from Vietnam to Canton 257 BC: An Doung Voung (Thuc Phan) unifies tribes of Vietnam and creates the kingdom of Auc Lac with his capital at Phuc An 208 BC: Chao To create the kingdom of Namviet in northern Vietnam 111 BC: China annexes the kingdom of Namviet 1## AD: an Indian brahmin founds the kingdom of Funan, with capital in Vyadhapura 192 AD: China expands into Vietnam to the border with the Champa empire 221 AD: China is unified and begins expanding south 529 AD: Rudrawarman founds a new dynasty in Champa 50#: the Srivijaya kingdom is founded in southern Sumatra (Indonesia) with capital in Palembang and Buddhism as the state religion 55# AD: the kingdom of Chenla (north Cambodia) annexes Funan (south Cambodia) 572: Sambhuvarman becomes king of Vietnam and builds monuments at Mi Son 58#: the Srivijaya kingdom expands on Java 605: China captures the Champa capital Trakieu 612: first inscriptions in the Khmer language 616: Isanavarman I becomes king of Chenla 627: Isanavarman I annexes Funan and northwest Cambodia 653: Prakasadharma becomes king of Cham and builds the Hinduist temples of My Son (Vietnam) 65#: the Nanchao kingdom forms in northern Burma 657: Jayavarman I of Chenla conquers north Laos and founds the Khmer dynasty 686: the Srivijaya kingdom expands over Sumatra (Indonesia) and the Malay peninsula 7##: the Sailendra, allied of Srivijaya, rule in central Java 717: the Chenla kingdom collapses and falls under the influence of the Sailendra 732: Sanjaya founds the Sanjaya dynasty in central Java (Indonesia) with capital in Mataram (central Java) 778: Sailendra king Dharmatunga begins construction of the Buddhist temple at Borobudur in Java (Indonesia) 791: the Nanchao kingdom (north Burma) expands under I-mou-hsun 802: Jayavarman II liberates the Khmers from Javanese domination and founds a new Hinduist kingdom in Cambodia, Angkor, with capital near Seam Reap (Roluos ruins) 82#: Sailendra king Samaratunga completes construction of the Buddhist temple at Borobudur in Java (Indonesia) 825: the kingdom of Pegu (south Burma) moves its capital at Hamsavati 832: the Nanchao kingdom (north Burma) subdues the Pyu people 832: the Sanjaya kingdom annexes the Sailendra kingdom in Java (Indonesia) 875: a new Champa kingdom is founded at Indrapura/ Quangnam under king Indravarman I who protects Buddhism 877: Indravarman I of Khmer creates a network of irrigation in Cambodia and builds the temples of Bakong and Preah Ko 889: Yasovarman I founds the city of Angkor 893: Indravarman II founds a new Champa dynasty 898: Sanjaya king Balitung of Mataram restores Hinduism in Central Java 907: China's domination of Indochina ends 910: Sanjaya king Daksa begins construction of the Hindu temples at Prambanan in Java (Indonesia) dedicated to Shiva 910: Yashovarman I establishes the Khmer capital at Yashodharapura (Angkor) 921: Jayavarman IV usurpes the throne of Khmer and moves the capital to Koh Ker 929: Sindok founds a new dynasty in East Java 938: Ngo Quyen liberates Vietnam from China at the battle of Bach Dang 939: Ngo Quyen declares the independence of Namviet and founds the kingdom of Annam (north Vietnam) 944: Rajendravarman becomes king of Khmer and moves the capital back to Angkor 950: the Khmer kingdom expands from Cambodia to Burma, Laos and Siam 968: Champa king Dinh Bo Linh founds the Dinh dynasty and moves the capital to Hoa Lu (Vietnam) 979: Annam's king Le Hoan founds the first Le dynasty in Vietnam 979: Champa (south Vietnam) king Paramesvaravarman attacks Annam (north Vietnam), the beginning of five centuries of warfare, but is defeated and killed 982: Annam's king Le Hoan captures the Champa capital Indrapura and the Champa kingdom moves its capital to Vjaya 982: 979: Annam's king Le Hoan captures the Champa capital Indrapura and the Champa kingdom moves its capital to Vjaya 985: Sanjaya king Dharmavamsa conquers Bali (Indonesia) 988: Harivarman II founds a new Champa kingdom with capital in Vijaya 1006: the Srivijaya kingdom of southern Sumatra (Indonesia) attacks Sanjaya, destroys Mataram (Central Java) and kills Dharmavamsa 1010: the Ly dynasty succeeds the Le dynasty and moves the capital of Annam to Thanh Long (Hanoi) 1019: Dharmavamsa's son-in-law Airlangga founds the Kahuripan kingdom in East Java (Indonesia) and invades Bali 1030: Airlangga annexes the kingdom of Srivijaya (Indonesia) through marriage but divides his kingdom between his sons (kingdoms of Janggala and Kediri) 1030: the Chola of India raid Srivijaya 1044: Annam raids the Champa capital and kills the Champa king in Vietnam 1049: Airlangga retires in a monastery and divides his kingdom between his two sons 1050: Udayadityavarman becomes king of Khmer and the empire reaches its peak (Cambodia, south Laos, south … [Read more...]

Hospecio Balbuena Balani, Jr. segment from the book “Masters of the Blade” by Master Rey Galang, 2006

guro bud balani 1 lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org guro bud balani 1 lameco ilustrisimo mandirigma.org

                    … [Read more...]

Arnis Boosts Fil-Am’s Sense of Pride – by Volt Contreras for The Philippine Daily Inquirer Newspaper Interviews Guro Arnold Noche, October 4, 2006

Arnold A. Noche is one of the remaining survivors of Lameco SOG under the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite of Lameco Eskrima International and is also a co-founder and instructor of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He made a recent visit to the Philippines to attend the 3rd World FMA Festival and Bakbakan International Invitational Tournament. Kali Klub, a project of Kapisanang Mandirigma, has received numerous awards and commendations from the City of Los Angeles, City of Walnut and State of California since the inception of the program in 1999. The Philippine Daily Inquirer is undeniably the country's most widely read and circulated newspaper. With over 2.7 million nationwide readers daily, it enjoys a market share of over 50% and tops the readership surveys. Not only is it the most read among  all sectors and ages, it is also the country's most trusted source of hard-hitting news and countless expos's. Distinguished by award-giving bodies like the Catholic Mass Media Awards, Jaime Ongpin Awards for Investigative Journalism and Anvil Awards, it is the Philippines' most awarded broadsheet with over 200 awards and citations. Arnis Boosts Fil-Am’s Sense of Pride By Volt Contreras Philippine Daily Inquirer Published on Page A1 of the October 4, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer. CROSSING land bridges that once linked the Philippine archipelago to the Asian mainland, ancient fighters introduced to Filipinos a form of martial arts believed to have come from India and now called kali, eskrima and arnis de mano. Yes, those rattan canes - and the graceful moves that make them lethal - are that old, according to generally held notions as to the origins of the Pinoy warrior art. With a deep sense of history, a Filipino-American based in California since the late '60s considers his mastery of kali (considered the pre-Spanish name for arnis or eskrima) as a bridge to the country of his birth - and hopes that more Fil-Am’s would join him in paying ambidextrous homage to their shared cultural roots. Arnold Noche has been taking time from his business each week, driving up to 48 kilometers from his home in the Gardena suburb, to conduct two-hour training sessions for kali enthusiasts of all ages at Filipino community centers in Los Angeles. "There's something about a stick in the hand that is very Filipino", noted Noche Noche and other "backyard" eskrimadors started the Kali Klub project in 1999 and have since taught an average of 250 students a year, around 90 percent of them Fil-Am’s aged 5 to over 40. Kali Klub sa FilAm ARTS Since 2004, Kali Klub has been conducting classes in partnership with FilAm Arts (Association for the Advancement of Filipino American Arts & Culture), a nonprofit, multidisciplinary arts organization located on N. Vermont Avenue in LA. Dealing with Confusion "I could have taught my (Fil-Am) students something else to help them deal with whatever confusion they may have about their cultural identity. But I am an eskrimador, and this is my way of helping them understand the complexities of being a Fil-Am," Noche said. His family moved to the States when he was only 2 years old. At age 8 he began studying karate and, at age 12, picked up his first kali sticks - henceforth earning bruises and scars in a discipline that would "control my life." At 40, Noche runs his own management consultancy and multimedia firm ATF1898 - a proud reference to the year Filipinos declared their independence from Spain. But in a recent Inquirer interview in Manila, he said he would rather be counted as a member of the "Filipino warrior class." He was referring to the disciples of an ancient art that had been in progression long before foreign powers reached Philippine soil. Employing real swords or knives in its original form, kali survived by being "secretly practiced" during colonial times when Filipinos were prohibited from carrying weapons. "It has been handed down from one generation to another, and has eventually made its way around the world. Now it is not only practiced by thousands of martial artists but also favored by elite military and law enforcement groups," Noche said. Action Flicks Further proof of its global appeal, he noted, is the growing number of Hollywood action flicks that feature kali movements in their fight sequences. Matt Damon, for example, in an interview on the hand-to-hand combat style of his "Jason Bourne" character, pronounced it as "kay-lee," he  said. Vin Diesel had also acknowledged training in kali for his sci-fi flick, "The Chronicles of Riddick." "Mission Impossible 3" and "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life" featured brief fight scenes with the lead stars Tom Cruise and Angelina Jolie, respectively, "using Filipino fighting sticks," Noche said. And Noche has this to say about Star Wars" Yoda: "My impression was that his moves (with the dazzling light … [Read more...]

Majapahit Empire, 1293 – 1500.

mandirigma.org

Majapahit was a vast archipelagic empire based on the island of Java from 1293 to around 1500. Majapahit reached its peak of glory during the era of Hayam Wuruk, whose reign from 1350 to 1389 marked by conquest which extended through Southeast Asia. His achievement is also credited to his prime minister, Gajah Mada. According to the Nagarakretagama (Desawarñana) written in 1365, Majapahit was an empire of 98 tributaries, stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea; consisting of present day Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, southern Thailand, the Philippines, and East Timor, although the true nature of Majapahit sphere of influence is still the subject of studies among historians. Majapahit was one of the last major empires of the region and is considered to be one of the greatest and most powerful empires in the history of Indonesia and Southeast Asia, one that is sometimes seen as the precedent for Indonesia's modern boundaries. Its influence extended beyond the modern territory of Indonesia and has been a subject of many studies. German orientalist Berthold Laufer suggested that maja came from the Javanese name of Indonesian tree. (From Wikipedia)                   … [Read more...]

Balintawak Grandmaster Venancio Bacon

venancio-bacon-balintawak venancio-bacon-balintawak venancio-bacon-balintawak venancio-bacon-balintawak

  Balintawak History Born in 1912, Venancio "Anciong" Bacon would later become one of the Philippines' legendary and most influential eskrimadors in history. He was born in Carcar, Cebu, and moved later to San Nicolas Town, just outside of Cebu City. He learned eskrima in the 1920s as a teenager. His evolution as an eskrimador began in San Nicolas. This journey would later lead him to death matches, attacks, and eventually to jail. But, not all of this journey was dismal. Along the way, Venancio Bacon made life long friends, and cultivated a loyal cadre of students, who to this day maintain an affinity incomparable towards him. Venancio Bacon's legacy, Balintawak, has become a title synonymous to Deadly. Balintawak eskrima is Economy, Elegance, Strength, and Speed expertly woven into one art form. This is the story of Great Grandmaster Venancio Bacon and the account of his legacy. In the early 1900s, the Spaniards had just left the Philippines, ending their 300 year rule. In their place, came the Americans. The vanguard elite of Cebu still spoke Spanish, while the Americans began to "pacify" and teach the rest of the Filipinos American English and culture. It was during this time that Venancio Bacon was born into, a nation in the midst of change and upheaval. He was born in Carcar, Cebu, but grew up in San Nicolas Town outside of Ciudad de Cebu, which at that time was populated by Cebu's elite upper class. This elite class was made up of Europeans, Americans, Chinese and mestizo Filipinos. In contrast, San Nicolas was composed of local Cebuanos and immigrants from neighboring towns, or from other islands in the Visayas. The people who lived in San Nicolas were farmers, carpenters, fishermen, peasants, cargadors and the servants for the City of Cebu's upper class. Venancio Bacon began training in the art of eskrima in the 1920s. His only teacher was Lorenzo "Ensong" Saavedra, of San Nicolas, who during this time had established the historic Labangon Fencing Club. At a time when many different styles of eskrima abound, Lorenzo Saavedra's was called the Corto Linear, although he was also known to have mastered other styles. His best students would be Teodoro "Doring" Saavedra, his nephew, and Venancio Bacon. The two were also very close friends. Both matured into great eskrimadors, improving each other's skills and answering challenge matches that came as a result of their newly acquired titles. The Labangon Fencing Club eventually dissipated into oblivion, giving way to a new organization borne out of its ashes. In 1933, the Doce Pares Club was formed. Headed by Lorenzo Saavedra, the club was composed of three Saavedra eskrimadors and nine from the Canete family. This composed the original twelve needed to symbolically actualize the title Doce Pares, which was taken from a popular roving play in the Philippines during the late 1800s and early 1900s depicting the twelve warrior swordsmen of Charlemagne. Another twelve were inducted to the club soon after, making the initial membership twenty-four, or Twelve Pairs. Venancio Bacon was among the first twenty-four. Although there were certain personalities in the club which ran counter to Venancio Bacon's own personality, he stayed and carried his weight as one of its representing eskrimadors. World War II broke out in the 1940s. With the onset of Japanese occupation, many eskrimadors became guerilla fighters, employing their art for the defense of their nation. It was during this time that, Teodoro Saavedra died at the hands of Japanese soldier-executioners. Long after the War, in 1952, Venancio Bacon established the club now known as Balintawak. He finally had enough of the personal bickerings and internal politics of the Doce Pares club. Along with Vincente "Inting" Atillo, Delfin Lopez, Jesus Cui, Timoteo "Timor" Maranga, Lorenzo Gonzales, Isidro Bardilas, Andres Olaibar, and a few others, Venancio Bacon began a new club. The newly formed club started training in the backyard of a watch shop owned by Eduardo Baculi, one of Venancio Bacon's students. This shop was located in a small side street in Colon, called Balintawak Street. The significance of the name Balintawak evoked the three virtues of strength, courage, and honor befitting that of the new club. So, from that day forth the word Balintawak would forever be intertwined with the name Venancio Bacon and to the style of eskrima which has proven its calculated violence effective time and again. Standing at 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighting no more that 120 pounds, Venancio Bacon was a very unassuming man. He was a veteran of a great many death matches in Cebu. Described by many of his students as lightning fast, Venancio Bacon maneuvered through a fight smoothly while exploiting his opponents' balance and coordination. He was known to be very surgical with a stick, able to employ varying force to his exact … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada , March 31st, 2012

kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima

Kapisanang Mandirigma presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada , March 31st, 2012 February 1, 2012 By dinof2 Leave a Comment (Edit) Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar, March 2012 Backyard Eskrima-Lameco SOG Seminar Date: March 31, 2012 Time:10am-4pm Location: 6366 W Sahara, Las Vegas, NV 89146 Rate: $99.00 per person Instructors: Guro Dino Flores & Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Contact: Ariel F. Mosses @ 702.533.9688       … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Conrad Manaois Seminar, Las Vegas, Nevada, Feb 19th, 2012

Manaois Eskrima

  Grand Master Manaois will be returning to Las Vegas, NV February 19, 2012 for another exciting combative arts seminar! We hope you can attend and participate in seeing for yourself Grand Masters devistating no holds barred fight tactics for the streets. Date: Feb 19, 2012 Location: 6366 W Sahara, Las Vegas, NV 89146 Time: 10:00am - 4:00pm Fee: $99.00 per person Contact: Ariel Flores Mosses About Grand Master Conrad Manaois began his training at the young age of seven under his father Marcelino "Ninoy" Manaois. Ninoy, as he was known was a Combat Judo and Jujitsu Expert and a Master of Cinco Teros Arnis who was undefeated in several of the so called "Death Matches" of the Philippines. After a formidable education under his fathers guidance, GM Manaois desired to further explore the Martial Arts world. Over a 46 year period he has studied many Martial Arts under some of the finest teachers of our time, such as Leo Gaje Jr. founder of the Pekiti-Tirsia Kali System, Master Richard Nunez of Lima Lama and Master Leon Wang - Chinese Kung Fu and Martial Arts Fight Choregrapher. Grand Master Conrad began teaching Martial Arts to a dedicated few individuals in 1977 at the Filipino Cultural Center in Los Angeles, California. In 1979, along with 3 other Masters, he created a unique form of empty hand fighting called Kali JuKune Do. Around this same time he began to look at his family system of Kali known as Ninoy Arnis System "Cinco Teros Arnis" and to improve on it. He called his new system Manaois Eskrima. In 1984 GM Conrad opened his first private school on Temple Street in Los Angeles. While continuing to teach in Los Angeles, his certified instructors have traveled and opened schools throughout the world.       Manaois Systems International / World Kali Jukune Do Federation Authorized Instructors by GM Conrad A. Manaois on Saturday, 14 January 2012 at 03:01 The Following are current/active instructors authorized by me: Bobis, Adrian C. - Manaois Systems International / Kali Jukune Do (LA, CA) Buenafe, Ronnie M. - Manaois Systems International / Kali Jukune Do (LA, CA) Kemper, Dale - Manaois Systems International (Moses Lake, WA) Mc Cabe, John - Manaois Systems International / Kali Jukune Do (Moses Lake, WA) Mosses, Ariel F. - Manaois Systems International / Kali Jukune Do (Las Vegas, NV) Navarette, Adrian - Kali Jukune Do (LA, CA) Rhodes, Rick - Manaois Systems International / Kali Jukune Do (Moses Lake, WA) Stacy, Chris - Manaois Systems International (LA, CA) Therrien, Rickey - Kali Jukune Do (LA, CA) All certificates that have been issued for Manaois Systems International / World Kali Jukune Do Federation in the past & present will be considered null and void, and regarded as expired unless it is authenticated by me. Maraming salamat, GM Conrad A. Manaois … [Read more...]

And you shall be as gods: The culture of the anting-anting (Part 2) By Dennis Villegas

anting anting 7 anting anting 6

And you shall be as gods: The culture of the anting-anting (Part 2)   By Dennis Villegas Monday, 09 August 2010 The Philippine Online Chronicles (www.thepoc.net) http://thepoc.net/thepoc-features/buhay-pinoy/buhay-pinoy-features/9267-the-culture-of-the-anting-anting-and-you-shall-be-as-gods-part-2-.html The arrival of the Spaniards in the Philippines in the 16th century proselytized the Filipino’s concept of God. To easily conquer the archipelago and introduce the Roman Catholic religion without antagonizing the superstitious and religious beliefs of the Filipinos, the Spanish friar missionaries presented the God of Roman Catholicism to be the same ancient Filipino God Bathala. The synthesis of the Roman Catholic religion and the pre-colonial religious and superstitious beliefs of the early Filipinos created a new kind of religion called Folk Catholicism, the religion of many millenarian groups in Southern Luzon, as well as the religion of anting-anting believers.   The Trespicio medallion of the Infinito Dios and the Tres Personas   The trinitarian dogma which is the most important of all Catholic doctrines gave way to the mythology that God, a spirit being, is an eye contained in a triangle. The triangle (or in anting-anting parlance, trespico), is the perfect representation of God, as it contained three equal sides or three equal corners, consistent with God’s three equal personalities. The triangular medallion, therefore, becomes one of the most popular of all the anting-anting. It symbolizes the oneness of the Infinito Dios and the Santissima Trinidad. Those who keep and faithfully believe in the trespico anting-anting can achieve oneness with the Infinito Dios and the Santissima Trinidad.   The Trespico medallion, believed by anting-anting faithful as an effective protector against evil because it contains the image and names of God. The symbols in this medallion include the Eye, representing the Infinito Dios, and the initials A.A.A which are the initials of the names of the Santissima Trinidad: Avetillo, Avetemit, Avelator (other names of the Santissima Trinidad are Aram, Ardam, Adradam). The ROMA is the initial of the title and name of God which means Rex Omnipotentem Macmamitam Adonay. One of the Trespico Seals of the Revolutionary Government of General Emilio Agunaldo in 1899.   The Trespico as seen in the altar of the religious sect Tres Personas Solo Dios in Mount Banahaw by the author in 2010.   God's Plan of Salvation God’s plan for the world is to save it from the clutches of the Devil. For this reason, one of the Santissima Trinidad has been assigned to go down to earth to save humankind. Only through his sacrifice and death can humankind be saved. But since God is immortal and cannot die, he must assume a human form, and before he must be born a human, he should be conceived by a woman. God being born as a human by a human mother is again one of those concepts that cannot easily be understood, especially among the early Filipinos who have a simple pre-colonial belief in the existence of God who is the first being in the universe. But for God to become human, and for God to be born by a woman, is something complex, especially if Catholicism teaches that the woman is the Mother of God, instead of just a blessed human person assigned by God to bear his human form. The woman--the Virgin Mary--conceived God in her womb. The official Catholic doctrine on her personality is stated clearly in the official Catholic book Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church published by the Vatican: Mary is truly “Mother of God” since she is the mother of the eternal Son of God made man, who is God himself. The image of a Mother God therefore plays an important role in the theogony of the anting- anting. In Filipino society, the mother of the family is viewed as the “ilaw ng tahanan” who provides her children with proper care, upbringing and education. Moreover, the early Filipino society, although strongly patriarchal, viewed women as mediators to God. As proof, the early priests were women called babaylan. The veneration of the Virgin Mary as the Mother of God is therefore consistent with the Filipino view of the important role played by the mother in Filipino family and society. The babaylan priesthood still exists at present in many folk Catholic religions in Southern Tagalog, most especially in the Ciudad Mistica de Dios and the Tres Personas Solo Dios in Mount Banahaw, where the religious leaders and priests are women. The idea of a Mother God was accepted by the early Filipinos as a given. Thus the Virgin Mary eventually took her place as an important God in the pantheon of the Gods among Filipinos. Monotheistic though the Catholic religion is as claimed by the Vatican, to the simplistic views of the pre-colonial Filipinos, … [Read more...]

And you shall be as gods: The culture of the anting-anting (Part 1) By Dennis Villegas

anting anting anting anting anting anting 6

And you shall be as gods: The culture of the anting-anting (Part 1) By Dennis Villegas The Philippine Online Chronicles (www.thepoc.net) http://thepoc.net/thepoc-features/buhay-pinoy/buhay-pinoy-features/9131.html Deep in the night of May 20, 1967, around 400 curiously-attired men congregated on Taft Avenue in Manila, near what is now Vito Cruz, with the intent to march to Malacanang Palace to ask for President Marcos’ resignation. The men wore anting-anting and colorful vests with mixed Latin and Tagalog inscriptions on them. Seemingly at odds with their appearance, they were also wielding daggers and three-foot-long jungle bolos signifying their rebellious intent. They were part of the millenarian sect called Lapiang Malaya (Freedom Society), a quasi-religious political society led by the charismatic 86-year-old Supremo Valentin delos Santos, a former Catholic priest, trained auto mechanic, one-time circus performer, and failed candidate in the past three presidential elections at that time.Early in May 1967, Tatang Valentin, as the Supremo was called, had demanded that Ferdinand Marcos step down. He also wanted the Philippine Armed Forces to surrender their arms to him. Deeply disillusioned by what he termed as the oppression of the poor and the continuing evil influence of foreigners in the Philippines, Tatang Valentin decided it was time to establish a new government, with him as the new Supreme Commander, Commander-in-Chief, and President of the Republic of the Philippines. President Marcos promptly rejected Tatang Valentin’s demand.  As the kapatid ("brothers," as Lapiang Malaya members were called) started to arrive from the provinces to gather in the society’s compound in Pasay, the Philippine Constabulary cordoned off the area to prevent more members from joining the already frenzied group. Then at around 12:30 in the morning of May 21, as the tension between the Lapiang Malaya members and the constabulary heightened, mock gunfire rang in the air, allegedly shot by a prankster. A violent skirmish between the kapatid and the constabulary followed – one that was so one-sided it was later to be called a massacre. As the constabulary opened fire, 32 of the kapatid were killed and some 40 seriously wounded. The constabulary had one mortality: a soldier who was hacked to death. In addition, five constabulary soldiers were wounded by bolo hacks, and three civilians hit by stray bullets.   One of the kapatid killed in the Lapiang Malaya massacre of May 21, 1967. Note the sacred vest and scarf he wears that gave no protection against bullets. Purist anting-anting believers would later say that those killed lacked faith in their anting- anting. This massacre of the Lapiang Malaya was one of the bloodiest episodes in recent Philippine history. As the front-line members of the Lapiang Malaya fell to gunfire, many other members realized their anting-anting would not protect them. Dispersing in many directions, they were later arrested and charged with rebellion. Later that morning, Tatang Valentin surrendered to the constabulary. He was brought to the National Mental Hospital, together with 11 of his high-ranking lieutenants. All of them were subjected to psychiatric evaluation and pronounced lunatic. Following his diagnosis, Tatang Valentin was confined to a cell together with a violent patient, who allegedly mauled the old man into a coma. He never regained consciousness and was declared dead in August 1967. The official medical report stated he died of pneumonia. After Tatang Valentin’s death, the Lapiang Malaya was officially dissolved by the government, with most members either pardoned or sent back to their respective provinces. Most of these were peasants, laborers, and common folks from Southern Tagalog who believed in Tatang Valentin’s promise of a new government based on “true equality and true liberty.” They also subscribed to Tatang Valentin’s promise of supernatural powers once they wore their anting-anting and sacred vests. He convinced them that the bullets of the enemies would turn into snakes and fall around them. But as it happened, and as proven in the bloody morning of May 21, the amulets they wore were no match for the automatic gunfire of the constabulary. The bullets easily tore through their vests, flesh, and bones.   Tatang Valentin delos Santos surrenders to the Constabulary   In retrospect, the Lapiang Malaya massacre is just one of the many episodes in the history of the Filipino mass movements whose combined quest for freedom and faith in the anting-anting led them to fight the oppression of those in power. The revolt of the Cofradia de San Jose in 1840, the Katipunan in 1896, the Colorum rebellions of Southern Tagalog in 1897, the Philippine Revolution of 1899, the Makario Sakay and Felipe Salvador rebellions during the … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Jose Diaz Caballero, De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal (1907-1987)

Guro Dino Flores

Grandmaster Jose Diaz Caballero was born on August 7, 1907 in Barrio Ibo, Toledo City, Cebu Province in the Philippine archipelago. As a youth he would travel from barangay (neighborhood) to barangay in order to watch eskrima matches during fiesta celebrations. These demonstrations mostly pre-arranged sparring called De Cadena were more of a cultural presentation than a display of real fighting which he was doggedly searching for. From his observations of these Eskrima exhibitions, he modified the moves with an emphasis on three striking levels: the eyes, lower arms (specifically elbows and hands), and knees. He was a fan of Western movies and often compared his style to the gunslinger “quick draw”. He later founded the devastating style known as De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal. In his prime, Jose Caballero was the Juego Todo champion. Juego Todo was all-out, no-holds-barred and did not allow the combatants to wear any protective gear like masks and armour. Death and permanent injury resulting from these duels was not uncommon. He beat many highly skilled Eskrimadors such as: Simeon Saavedra of Talisay, Balbino Mancao, Vicente Labor, Juan Carolla of Ilocos, Alfredo Macalolan of Negros, Tanciong Lopez from Cebu City, Salomon Canonio, Heneroso Carbajosa, Horje Navajo, Pastor Hingoyon and many lesser known challengers. One of his more notable fights took place in 1936 against an Eskrimador named Anoy, from the nearby town of Tangub. Jose Caballero utilized his system of 1-2-3 strikes in order to disarm and wound the stunned Anoy, who promptly surrendered. The combination of strikes was delivered so quickly, that the crowd had not fully understood what had just taken place. This resulted in the perception that the match was fixed, and they began shouting “TAYOPE!” (fixed). Unlike many so-called death match “duelists” and “unbeaten champions” who can’t even recall the names of the opponents they conquered, the foregoing list of eskrimadors vanquished by GM Caballero is a testament of the authenticity of his title as the Juego Todo champion of his era. No less than GM Filemon “Momoy” Canete of San Miguel Eskrima a good friend of GM Caballero once vouched: “Dili ko makig duwa ana imong eskrima Joe, pangpatay man nag sawa.” (I won’t fool around with your eskrima Joe, it’s for killing pythons.) Grandmaster Caballero served in the Philippine Constabulary and was once assigned to the hostile Moro country of Lanao province. After his retirement from the Constabulary, he continued to teach his brand of Eskrima, and at the same time, the challenges that were part and parcel of the art continued to hound him. The remaining living witness to GM Caballero’s Juego Todo duels is Egmidio Tubal a retired PC soldier of Davao City. The old warrior died on August 24 1987 … [Read more...]

BOOK: THE JAPANESE OCCUPATION (Kasaysayan History of the Filipino People Vol 7) by Ricardo T. Jose (1998)

mandirigma.org mandirigma.org mandirigma.org lameco eskrima

  The book tells of a dark chapter in the history of the Philippines during World War 2. Publisher: Reader's Digest Author: Ricardo  Jose Pages: 303 Contents: 1. The Zero Hour 2. The Advent of War 3. A Retreat to Bataan 4. The End of Organized Resistance 5. Under the Rising Sun 6. Independence Under Japan 7. Uniting a Nation At War 8. The controlled Economy 9. Never Enough Food 10. Reshaping the Filipino Mind 11. Free Areas and Resistnace Fighters 12. Waiting for Victory Joe     … [Read more...]

BOOK: Retaking the Philippines – America’s Return to Corregidor and Bataan: October 1944 – March 1945 By William B. Brewer.

lameco eskrima lameco eskrima mandirigma.org lameco eskrima lameco eskrima mandirigma.org

Retaking the Philippines - America's Return to Corregidor and Bataan: October 1944 - March 1945. By William B. Brewer. "In 1944, General MacArthur launched a series of invasions he would later call 'the boldest and most daring in military history, ' the recapture of Manila, Corregidor and Bataan in the South Pacific. Here William B. Breuer reexamines and recreates this important episode of World War II: the initial clash between MacArthur and Navy brass; the raids on Japanese prison camps at Los Banos and Manila to rescue U. S. Soldiers and civilians, the heroics of Allied spies and Filipino guerrillas.                       … [Read more...]

BOOK: Color Photos Of America’s New Possessions by F. Tennyson Neely (1899)

kali lameco eskrima lameco eskrima mandirigma.org kali lameco eskrima lameco eskrima mandirigma.org

Color Photos Of America's New Possessions by  F. Tennyson Neely (1899) Collection of color photographs of the Spanish - American War military actions in the Philippines. Many of these photographs are not found in any other books!   Read it online at The Library of Congress . http://www.archive.org/stream/neelyscolorphoto00newy#page/n0/mode/2up http://www.archive.org/details/neelyscolorphoto00newy       … [Read more...]

BOOK: FOUNDERS OF FREEDOM, The History of the Three Philippine Constitutions (1971)

kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima

Description: The book tells the history of struggle for freedom in the Philippines, from the first massive filipino alliance against Spain during the 16th century, to the Philippine Revolution, to the founding of the Philippine republic, and the succession of Presidents up to the time of President Marcos. Its a book that conditions citizens to the framing of the new Constitution in 1972. In the introduction reads: "Seventy-Three years ago, on 12 June 1898, General Emilio Aguinaldo, Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the Revolution, declared the independence of the Philippines at Kawit". Writers: Vicente Albano Pacis, Dr. Jose M. Aruego, Esteban De Ocampo, Carlos Quirino, Jose Luna Castro, Mauro Garcia, Isidro L. Retizos, D.H. Soriano Publisher: Elena Hollman Roces Foundation, Inc         … [Read more...]

BOOK: Memories of the Philippine Revolution Apolinario Mabini (1963)

www.mandirigma.org lameco lameco lameco

Memories of the Philippine Revolution  Apolinario Mabini (1963) Description: Apolinario Mabini's biographical work about the Philippine Revolution of 1896. Text in Spanish. Publisher: Bureau of Public Printing-Manila. 1963 Author: Apolinario Mabini Pages: 254 … [Read more...]

BOOK: The Philippine Islands and Japan By G. Waldo Browne (1901)

www.mandirigma.org www.mandirigma.org www.mandirigma.org www.mandirigma.org

Illustrated with Photogravure, Colored Plates, Engravings and Maps Richly illustrated with 166 RARE vintage photographs and illustrations from the early 1900's ! You will take a journey with the author G. Waldo Browne and view many historical, cultural, and incredible photographs of a time forgotten. Writing about his travels, G. Waldo Browne gave his readers detailed stories and interesting information about the local history, myths, and facts of the countries he visited so that every American could get a glimpse, first hand of the worlds beyond our shores.   Contents The Philippine Islands, By Maj.-Gen. Joseph Wheeler Japan, By Kogoro Takahira The Philippines The Pearls Of The Orient The People Of The Philippines The Animal Kingdom Spanish Discovery And Dominion Rivalry Of Church And State Colonial Wars Resources And Commerce Most Noted Towns Struggles For Liberty America In The Orient Japan The Land Of The Gods The Gateway Of The Orient First Glimpses The Imperial Roads The Modern Capital Customs And Costumes City And Country   Full Page Engravings Courtyard To Chinese Temple Suspension Bridge Connecting Old And New Manila Water Front At Manila Native Milk Peddlers In The Suburbs Of Manila Santa Cruz Plaza, Manila Native Theatre, Taguig General Otis And Staff At The Governor’s Palace, Manila Rainy Season In The Eremita District Hawaiian Flowers, Coloured Principal Gateway, Old Manila Hawaiian Flowers. Coloured Manila Fire Department Group Of Insurgents, Taken Prisoners Cigar Factory, Manila A Company Of Insurgents Graves Of The Astor Battery Headquarters, Pasig Hawaiian Flowers. Coloured Three Little Maids. Coloured Fujiyama From Maeda Village, Tokaido Peony Garden, Kanazawa The Beautiful Iris Bluff Garden, Yokohai Chrysanthemums Walking Costume Coloured Tea-House Garden, Oji, Tokio A Typical Japanese Lady Planting Rice Kirifuri Cascade, Nikko   Coloured Maps The Philippines Japan Illustrations The Philippines Landscape On East Side Of Mindanao Mail Station On Bay Of Ulugan Volcano Of Apo Volcano Of Mayon, Luzon Looking Up Pasig River At Pretil Just Above Manila Native Village, Island Of Negros Bamboo Bridge, Iloilo Construction Of A Philippino House Bamboo Yard Native Houses Village On Mindanao General View Of Iloilo Manila Street, Rainy Season Manila Street, Rainy Season Types Of Malays Negritos Native Warrior From Interior Of Mindanao Philippino Fruit Girl A Wealthy Half-Caste Philippino Lady Mestizos Sulu Prau Sultan Of Sulu Interviewing European Visitors Mohammed, Sultan Of Sulu Igorrotes Igorrote Pipes Carabaos Transporting Army Stores Village On The Island Of Guimaras Street-Cars In Manila Young Wild Goat Calao Bird Peacock Village On Mindanao River Scene On Mindanao Mindanao Warrior Merchant Vessels, Pasig River Mouth Of River Coihulo, Palawan Village Of Bahele, Palawan Oldest Church In Manila Arsenal At Puerto Princessa, Palawan Drawbridge And Gate Of Old City Old Cannon On Sea-Wall At Manila River Scene Near Iloilo Spanish Priest Ancient Gate At Manila A Tagalo Bungalow In Luzon Philippino Girl Church And Square At Malolos Old Stone Bridge Near Manila Manila Street, Rainy Season Manila Street, Rainy Season The Native Market At Manila On The Wall Of The Old City Of Manila Native Boats On Pasig Above Bridge Of Spain Rita Island, Bay Of Ulugan Cavite Arsenal And Shipyard Bathing Place At Manila A Tagalo Family Out For A Drive In A Caretela Travel In Rainy Season Volcano Of Apo Scene In Bulacan Plantation On Mindanao Scene At Puerto Princessa, Palawan Cigar Dealer Street In Old Manila Train On Manila And Dagupin Railway Manila And Dagupin Railway Station Governor’s Palace, Manila Village In The Suburbs Of Manila Street In Business Section Of Manila Fountain On Promenade San Miguel, Manila Cavite Arsenal Social Entertainment Under Spanish Regime Schoolhouse Village Of Olas Pinas, On Outskirts Of Manila Dagaupan, Rio Horno Sulu Woman A Native Of Malabon And His Family Emilio Aguinaldo, Leader Of Insurrection Of 1899 Cannon Used By Insurgents In 1899 Mountain Cataract Sentry Post On The Luneta Road Scene In Suburbs Of Manila Aguinaldo’s Family And Relatives Admiral George Dewey U. S. S. Olympia U. S. S. Baltimore The Battle Of Manila Bay Major-General Wesley Merritt Group Of Officers, Leaders Of Insurrection, 1899 General Augusti Islets Of Calamianes Group, Between Mindoro And Palawan General Otis F. Agoncillo, Envoy Of Insurgents Plaza Alfonso XII., Iloilo Mountain Inn, Luzon Exterior Of Insurgents Capitol At Malolos, 1899 Mushroom Islands Waterfall And Rapids On Taygula River, Mindanao Boar Japan Greeting Scenery Among The Pine Islands Fujiyama A Farmer Yokohama Harbour A Junk Street On Water-Front, Yokohama Lotus Lake, Myeno Double Bridge In Imperial … [Read more...]

BOOK: UNCLE SAM’S BOYS In PHILIPPINES by By H.Irving Hancock (1912)

lameco lameco lameco lameco lameco lameco lameco lameco lameco

  The Project Gutenberg eBook, Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines, by H. Irving Hancock This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines or, Following the Flag against the Moros Author: H. Irving Hancock Release Date: November 11, 2007 [eBook #23447] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK UNCLE SAM'S BOYS IN THE PHILIPPINES***   E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)     Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines OR Following the Flag against the Moros By H. IRVING HANCOCK Author of Uncle Sam's Boys in the Ranks, Uncle Sam's Boys on Field Duty, Uncle Sam's Boys as Sergeants, The Motor Boat Club Series, The Grammar School Boys Series, The High School Boys Series, The West Point Series, The Annapolis Series, The Young Engineers Series, etc., etc. Illustrated     PHILADELPHIA HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY Copyright, 1912, by Howard E. Altemus Frontispiece. CONTENTS Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines The Filipino Dandy A Meeting at the Nipa Barracks Plotters Travel With the Flag Cerverra's Innocent Shop Enough to "Rattle" the Victim Life Hangs on a Word The Kind of Man Who Masters Others The Right Man in the Guard House News Comes of the Uprising The Insult to the Flag In the First Brush With Moros The Brown Men at Bay—For How Long? A Tale of Moro Blackmail The Call for Midnight Courage In a Cinch With Cold Steel Datto Hakkut Makes a New Move "Long" Green and Kelly Have Innings Sentry Miggs Makes a Gruesome Find Hal Turns the Gatling Gun Loose Corporal Duxbridge's Mistake Scouting in Deadly Earnest Playing Goo-Goo in a Grim Game Dooming the Datto Conclusion Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines CHAPTER I THE FILIPINO DANDY "We've solved one problem at last, Noll," declared Sergeant Hal Overton seriously. "Only one?" demanded young Sergeant Terry quizzically. But Hal, becoming only the more serious, went on earnestly: "At last we begin to understand just what the 'lure of the Orient' means! For years I've been reading about the Orient, and the way that this part of the world charms men and holds them. Now, that we are here on the spot, I begin to understand it all. Noll, my boy, the East is a great and wonderful place! I wonder if I shall ever tire of it?" "I believe I could tire of it in time," remarked Sergeant Terry, of the Thirty-fourth United States Infantry. "But you haven't yet," insisted Sergeant Hal. "What, when we've been here only three days? Naturally I haven't. And, besides, all we've seen is Manila, and certainly Manila can't be more than one little jumping-off corner of the Orient that you're so enthusiastic about." "You're wild about the Far East, too—even the one little corner of it that we've seen," retorted Sergeant Hal. "Don't be a grouch or a knocker, Noll. Own up that you wouldn't start for the United States to-morrow if you were offered double pay back in the home country." "No; I wouldn't," confessed Sergeant Terry. "I want to see a lot more of these Philippine Islands before I go back to our own land." "Just halt where you are and look about you," went on enthusiastic Sergeant Hal. "Try to picture this scene as Broadway, in New York." "Or Main Street in our own little home city," laughed Sergeant Terry quietly. Certainly the scene was entirely different from anything that the two young Army boys had ever seen before. They stood on the Escolta, which is the main business thoroughfare of New Manila, as that portion of the Philippine capital north of the little river is called. South of the river is Old Manila, the walled city of the old days of the Spanish conquerors. South of the walled city lie two rather fashionable residence suburbs, Ermita and Malate. But the Thirty-fourth was temporarily stationed in big nipa barracks at Malate. It was in the newer Manila that the two boyish young sergeants found their greatest interest. It was a busy, bustling scene. There is nothing exactly like the Escolta in any other part of the world. The whole of this crooked, winding thoroughfare seemed alive with horses and people—with the horses in more than goodly proportion. Along the Escolta are the principal wholesale and retail houses of the city. Here is the post office, there the "Botanica" or principal drug store, operating under English capital and a Spanish name; down near the water front is the Hotel de Paris, a place famous for the good dinners of the East. Further up the Escolta, just around a slight bend, is the Oriente Hotel, the stopping … [Read more...]

Project Gutenberg’s The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803, by E.H. Blair

www.mandirigma.org ilustrisimo lameco

Project Gutenberg's The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803, by E.H. Blair This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 Volume III, 1569-1576 Author: E.H. Blair Release Date: December 6, 2004 [EBook #13616] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 1493-1803 *** Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders Team. The Philippine Islands, 1493–1803   Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the beginning of the nineteenth century   Volume III, 1569–1576 Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson with historical introduction and additional notes by Edward Gaylord Bourne. Page 1 Contents of Volume III Preface. ... 15 Documents of 1569 Letter to Felipe II. Guido de Lavezaris; Cebu, June 5. ... 29 Letter to Felipe II. Andrés de Mirandaola; Cubu, June 8. ... 33 Letter to Marqués de Falçes. M.L. de Legazpi; Çubu, July 7. ... 44 Relation of the Filipinas islands. M.L. de Legazpi; [Çubu, July 7]. ... 54 Confirmation of Legazpi's title as governor and captain-general. Felipe II; Madrid, August 14. ... 62 Documents of 1570 Letter to Felipe II. Fray Diego de Herrera; Mexico, January 16. ... 69 Relation of the voyage to Luzón. [June, 1570?]. ... 73 Act of taking possession of Luzón. Martin de Goiti and Hernando Riquel; Manila, June 6. ... 105 Letter to Felipe II. M. L. de Legazpi; Panae, July 25. ... 108 Evidence regarding the Portuguese expedition against Cebú. M.L. de Legazpi; Çubu, October 21. ... 113 Page 2 Documents of 1571–72 Relation of the discoveries of the Malucos and Philippinas. [1571?]. ... 121 Requisitions of supplies for the Spanish forces in the Philippines [1571?]. ... 132 Conquest of the island of Luzon. Manila, April 20, 1572. ... 141 Foundation of the city of Manila. Fernando Riquel; Manilla, June 19, 1572. ... 173 Documents of 1573 Expenses incurred for the expedition to the Western Islands, 1569–72. Melchior de Legazpi; Mexico, March 2. ... 177 Affairs in the Philippines after the death of Legazpi. Guido de Lavezaris; Manila, June 29. ... 179 Relation of the Western Islands called Filipinas. Diego de Artieda. ... 190 Letter from the viceroy of New Spain to Felipe II. Martin Enriquez; Mexico, December 5. ... 209 Documents of 1574 Letter to Felipe II. Andrés de Mirandaola; January 8. ... 223 1Las nuevas quescriven de las yslas del Poniente Hernando Riquel y otros; Mexico, January 11. ... 230 Two royal decrees regarding Manila and Luzón. Felipe II; Madrid, June 21. ... 250 Opinion regarding tribute from the Indians. Fray Martin de Rada; Manila, June 21. ... 253 Page 3 Reply to Fray Rada's “Opinion.” Guido de Lavezaris and others; [Manila, June, 1574?]. ... 260 Two letters to Felipe II. Guido de Lavezaris; Manila, July 17 and 30. ... 272 Slavery among the natives. Guido de Lavezaris; [July?]. ... 286 Documents of 1575–76 Part of a letter to the viceroy. Guido de Lavezaris; [Manila, 1575?]. ... 291 Letter to Felipe II. Juan Pacheco Maldonado; [Manila, 1575?]. ... 295 Encomiendas forbidden to royal officials. Francisco de Sande, and others; Manila, May 26, 1576. ... 304 Letter to Felipe II. Francisco de Sande; Manila, June 2, 1576. ... 312 Bibliographical Data. ... 315 Page 4 1 This document is printed in both Spanish text and English translation. Illustrations Portrait of Fray Martin de Rada, O.S.A.; photographic reproduction of painting in possession of Colegio de Agustinos Filipinos, Valladolid. ... Frontispiece Landing of the Spaniards at Cebú, in 1565; photographic reproduction of a painting at the Colegio de Agustinos Filipinos, Valladolid. ... 35 Map showing the first landing-place of Legazpi in the Philippines; photographic facsimile of original (manuscript) map, contained in the pilots' log-book of the voyage, preserved in the Archivo General de Indias, at Sevilla. ... 47 “Asiae nova descriptio” (original in colors), map in Theatrum orbis terrarum, by Abraham Ortelius (Antverpiae, M. D. LXX), fol. 3; reduced photographic facsimile, from copy in Boston Public Library. ... 86, 87 Page 5 Preface The documents presented in this volume cover the last three years of Legazpi's administration in the islands, the governorship of Guido … [Read more...]

1609: The Spanish Conquest of Philippines Argensola, B. L. Lic. (1609)

kali arnis eskrima mandirigma.org

Author: Argensola, B. L. Lic. Title: Conquista de las Islas Malucas al Rey Felipe III. N.  Sr. Escrita por el capellán de la  Magestad de la Emperatriz y Retor de Villa hermosa. Date and publisher: Madrid. Ediciones de Alonso Martín. 1609. Description: First  edition of one of the first books to deal fully with the Spanish conquest of  the Moluccas, the Spice Islands, and of the Philippines, 1564--1572, under the conquistador Miguel López de  Legaspi. This famous book deals with those exploits, with the natural history  of these islands, the manners and customs of the natives and the voyages  through the Straits of Magellan; regarded by Hill as an 'essential work for the  history of Spanish and Portuguese exploration in the East Indies'. Argensolas´ narrative is noted for its  breadth of knowledge and over-all grasp of world politics. 'In his digressions  on people and places,' writes Lach (Asia in the making of Europe, III,  pp. 311-12), 'Argensola´s adds significantly to the stockpile of information on  Asia, especially on the Moluccas, Java, Sumatra, and Ceylon. His book also ties  together neatly the affairs of Europe with struggles in the overseas areas, for he sees the  spice trade in its worldwide ramifications and makes his reader acutely aware  of its immediate and potential interest for Japan and China.´ Binding: Modern  half-vellum. Size: 11 x 7.5   inches / 28,5 x 15 cm. An  unusually large copy (most copies have the title page trimmed). Number of pages: 10 + 407 pages. Conquista de las Islas Molucas (1609) [Rare McPar DS674 .L4 1609], written by Bartolomé Leonardo de Argensola, a Spanish historian and poet who took holy orders and was later appointed royal chaplain and historiographer of Aragon. This particular text was commissioned by the Council of the Indies to commemorate the Spanish recapture of the Moluccan Islands of Ternate and Tidore in 1606. It was very well received upon its initial publication, and continues to be an important source for research into Spanish and Portuguese exploration in the East Indies, the conquest of the Philippines, and the history of the spice trade, especially since Argensola consulted numerous primary sources in the archives of the Indies when writing this work. Our volume is bound in its original brown leather over paper boards, though the spine has been rebacked in brown leather gilt and the endpapers replaced. The text itself is very finely printed, with numerous ornamental head- and tail-pieces and woodcut initials, and an especially fine engraved title page. This page, pictured below, illustrates, within an elaborate architectural border, an allegory of the Spanish conquest of the Moluccas. The amazon queen “Maluca” is depicted seated astride a crocodile, wearing a feather headdress and holding a sword in her left hand while in her right she raises a horn of plenty filled with the fruits of her lands. Her gaze is directed upward to where a rainbow is shown containing the royal crest of Spain, shimmering in the light, signifying, with the word simul, the fact that the sun never sets on the Spanish empire. In the background is an active volcano, of which there are several on these islands, and seashells are strewn before her feet. … [Read more...]

BOOK: THE JESUITS IN THE PHILIPPINES 1581-1768 by H.V. de la Costa, S.J. (1951)

kali arnis eskrima escrima kali arnis eskrima escrima

    Description: "This fascinating story of cross and sword, laid in an extraordinary setting, describes the role of the Jesuits in the Philippines. Their history- as missionaries, educators, and colonizers - is so entwined with that of the Islands that one cannot be discussed without the other. Accordingly, documents in the Roman, Spanish and Philippines archives of the Prder, as well as those of the general colonial achives at Madrid and Seville, have been colorfully employed to present a wide segment of the general history of the Spanish empire in the PHilippines and the Far East." -- first paragraph of the dust jacket text.   The book contains maps and illustrations Author: H. de la Costa, S.J. Pages: 702           … [Read more...]

BOOK: A Woman’s Journey Through The Philippines by Florence Kimball Russel, 1907

kali arnis eskrimakali arnis eskrimakali arnis eskrima kali arnis eskrima

    A Woman's Journey Through The Philippines On A Cable Ship That Linked Together The Strange Lands Seen En Route. By Florence Kimball Russel Author of "Born to the Blue" Etc.   Contents Introductory Statements Dumaguete Misamis Iligan Cagavan Cebu Zamboanga Sulu Bongao Tampakan and the Home Stretch   Illustrations The Belle of Bongao Laying a Shore End in a Philippine Coast Town "Until eventide the summer skies above us slept, as sid the summer seas below us" A Philippine Coast Town Dumaguete Diving for Articles Thrown from the Ship "Hard at work establishing an office in the town" "Two women beating clothes on the rocks of a little stream" Church and convento, Dumaguete The Old Fort at Misamis "The native band serenaded us" The Lintogup River A Misamis Belle Laying Cable from a Native Schooner A Street in Iligan Market-day at Iligan "It was evident that he was a personage of no little importance" St. Thomas Church, Cebu Magellan's Chapel, Cebu Unloading Hemp at Cebu Grove of Palms near Cebu Ormoc Releasing the Buoy From the Cable in a Heavy Sea Quarters of the Commanding Officer, Zamboanga Officers' Quarters, Zamboanga A Street in Zamboanga Street Scene, Zamboanga Native Bathing-place, Zamboanga The Pier at Sulu Natives of Sulu Moro Houses, Tuli The Moro School for Boys, Sulu Chinese, Moro, and Visayan Children, Sulu Soldiers' Quarters, Bongao Natives of Bongao Toolawee Market-day in a Moro Village A Group of Moros A Collection of Moro Weapons Pasacao Illustrated With 40 Rare Photographic Plates                                                 … [Read more...]

BOOK: The Hawaiian Islands, Manila and The Edge Of China by Burton Holmes, 1901

arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima

Burton Holmes Lectures Hawaiian Islands Edge Of China Manila Old Antique Travelogue With Over 350 Photographs ! Subjects covered in this book Advertisements Chinese native runners at Hong Kong, Aguinaldo General military operations, Ah Cum Canton guide, Ah Fong Chinese Croesus, Hawaiian home, Macao residence, Ah Kee Incident on the Esmeralda, Ancestor Worship China, Ancestral Temples China, Aqueducts Hawaii, Bacoor Bay battle in distance, Baliuag military operations, Aguinaldo, American garrison, Church used by American soldiers, Distress signals, Exhibition of defense manoeuvers, Military rule, Page Colonel in command, Telegraph wires cut, Bank of Hongkong, Banquets U S troops in Honolulu, Barbara Fritchie uptodate incident on the Esmeralda, Barges used as houseboats Canton, Barracks, Baliuag church used by American soldiers, Manila theater, Bathing American troops at Honolulu, Beer American Manila, BetelNuts chewing China, Betting See Gambling, Binondo commercial district of Manila, Bluffs Hawaiian coast, Boats, Canton, Filipino bote, Surfriding at Waikiki, Bridge over Pasig river, Brumby FlagLieut U S S, Olympia at Hongkong, Bubonic Plague Hongkong, Buffalo in Manila, Business in Honolulu, Cabs Manila, Cafe de Paris Manila, Caldwell secretary to Admiral, Dewey, Calesa Filipino cart, Calle Nozaleda Manila, Camoens Luiz de, Caneflumes Hawaii, Cane See Sugarcane, Canton, Ah Cum guide, Arrival of travellers, Boats, Clocks, Commercial gateway to south China, Consul visit to U S, Dentists, Descriptions manners and customs, Emigration to United States, Execution place of, French cathedral, Gates of city closing, Hongkong to Canton journey, Hotel Victoria, Kerosene lamps, Literary refuse, Pawn shops, Photography difficulties, Port of Canton See Hongkong, Provincial mint, River front, River steamer from Macao, Sanitary conditions, Shameen foreign quarter, Shops, Streets, Care of, Life in, Signs and names, Temple of the emperor, Viceroy Yeh, Water dwellers on, Carabao, Carriage Filipino calesa, Cataracts Hawaii, Cathedrals, Canton French cathedral, Manila, Cavite scene of naval battle, Chairs bamboo, China, Ability of the Chinese, Ah Fong, Ambition of every Chinese boy, Ancestor worship, Betelnuts chewing, Canton See that title, Coolie labor, Commerce British, Consuls See that title, Currency, Day length and divisions, Dinner parties, Disembarkation methods, Education, Emigration from China to U S, Emperor temple of, First impressions, Food, Funeral rites and care of dead, Gods, Hawaiian Islands Chinese population, Heung Shan Island, Hongkong, Hotels Canton, Jinrikishas Honkong, Journey to, Kowloon shipyards, Li Hung Chang, Macao See that title, Money, Officials preliminary education, Paper with writing preservation of, Pawn shops Canton, Photography experiences, Canton, Dewey Admiral at Hongkong, Pigs sacred, Progress opposition to, Religion, Rivercraft, Sampans, Scholarship, Steerage passengers Chinese, Temples ancestral, Time measurement, Women, Churches, Baliuag used by American soldiers, Macao San Paulo, Manila San Sebastian, Clocks Chinese, Cockfights Manila prohibited by American government, Coffee in Hawaii, Commerce Hongkong, Consuls visits to United States, Smith Hub at Canton, Wildman R at Hongkong, Cook Captain in Hawaii, Coolies Chinese, Coral Reef Pearl Harbor, Corregidor Manila Bay, Cortes Brothers, Curfew law in Manila, Dagupan railway Philippines, Damien Father of Mobkai, Dampness Hongkong, Day length and division in China, Dead care of China, Deities Chinese, Dentists Canton, Dewey Admiral at Hongkong, Diamond Head Honolulu view of, Dinner Party Chinese, Dress, Hawaiian women’s holokus, Hongkong white suits, Dutch Wife Manila hotel, Education China, Emigrants from China, Empress of China voyage to China, Escolta Manila, Esmeralda voyage to Manila, Arrival at Manila, Bacoor Bay, Barbara Fritchie incident, Cavite, Corregidor, Heat, Humidity, Manila Bay, Quarantine, Rain, Sleeping places, Traveling companion, Execution place of Canton, Father Damien of Molokai, Father of Annexation Dr McGrew of Pearl Harbor, Ferries Manila, Filipinos See Philippines; Manila, Fire Brigade Manila, Fire Drill on Empress of China, Fire Goddess Pele, Flag Hawaiian, Flameflowers Honolulu bowers, Flowers, Flameflowers, Leis, Flowerboats as restaurants Canton, Food, Chinese, Hawaiian, Friars Spanish at Manila, Funerals Chinese, Garlands Hawaiian leis, Gates Canton closing, Gods Chinese, Government Building Honolulu, Griffin Far Eastern word for tenderfoot, Guide Ah Cumin Canton, Gulches Hawaiian, Haleakala Hawaiian volcanic crater, Harbor Pearl Hawaiian, Hawaii island of, Bluffs, Coffeeland, Hilo, Kealakekua Bay monument to Capt Cook, Kilauea volcano, Mauna Kea mountain, Mauna Loa, Ports, Hawaiian Islands, American soldiers, Annexation to U, Coffee plantations, Cook Captain, First impressions of, Flag description, Hawaii island of, Hilo, … [Read more...]

BOOK: Through The Philippines (and Hawaii), 1925-1926, by Frank G. Carpenter – Litt. D., F.R.G.S.

mandirigma mandirigma mandirigma mandirigma

Title: Through The Philippines (and Hawaii) Date: 1925-1926 Author: Frank G. Carpenter - Litt. D., F.R.G.S. A wonderful old book richly illustrated with 112 RARE high quality vintage photographs taken in the early 1900's ! You will take a journey with the author Frank G. Carpenter and view many historical, cultural, and incredible photographs of a time forgotten. Writing about his travels in the series "Carpenter's World Travels", Frank G. Carpenter gave his readers detailed stories and fascinating information about the local history, myths, and facts of the countries he visited so that every American could get a glimpse, first hand of the worlds beyond our shores. This book is mainly about the Philippines, but it also has a section about Hawaii.   Chapters Just a word before we start From Athens to Manila The Philippine capital, old and new In the Tondo market The fair Filipina Going to school in Manila Tobacco fields and factories Through Northern Luzon by rail Baguio Our heathen wards Camp John Hayand the Igorots The Benguet gold mines The School Republic of Munoz Homesteading in the Philippines By ponyback through the forest The rice terraces of Ifugaoland Where Magellan raised the flag of Spain Coconut farms The world's biggest leper colony On the Sugar Island of Negros In Zamboanga, capital of Moroland Basilan, our new Rubber Island Motoring across Jolo The Sultan of Sulu Davao, land of Manilla hemp The Bagobos and their neighbours The business man of the Philippines The question of independence Hawaii, at the crossroads of the Pacific Our sugar and pineapple islands List of photographs Scene in Zamboanga Riding in a chair through the mountains Mt. Taal San Juan Bridge The waterways of Manila The Luneta Business section of Manila The Parian Gate The walls of old Manila Residence of the Governor-General A Philippine stove Hauling coconut husks Market day in Manila The papaya A Filipina in business A fair Filipina Hat-making for export Girls' baseball team. Weaving by hand The high school at Batangas Learning the English language Exercising on the playgrounds Growing vegetables in a school garden A Philippine star baseball player A Philippine cigarette-maker Tobacco growing Bringing in the rice Threshing Rice planting Pounding out the grain. Lingayen Gulf Baguio The Benguet Road Philippine caddies Going to market on Sunday Mountain road of Luzon Igorot porter Igorot girls learning to sew Camp John Hay Ilongot head-hunters A family of Apayaos An Igorot miner The Benguet gold mine Studying mining methods in the wilds of Luzon "Poor man's rice" Farming at Munoz Ploughing with the carabao Student's house at Munoz Bamboo I gorot road-workers Carabaos taking a bath Homesteaders on the move Threshing rice with carabaos A motor truck in the wilds of Mountain Province A Philippine forest Hauling logs Rice terraces of the Ifugaos An Ifugao home Ifugao types Where Magellan heard mass at Cebu A solid wheeled cart of Cebu A fishing boat Eating coconuts Coconut rafts A copra pack train Drying coconuts Leper colony on Culion Island Penal farm at San Ramon Bilibid prisoners at work Meal-time at the prison A Shakespearean play at Silliman Institute Primitive sugar mill Cutting sugar cane American tractors in the Philippines Cock fighting Port at Zamboanga Moro girls studying the Koran A Mindanao policeman. A Moro chieftain's daughter Mr. Carpenter interviews a Moro Tapping a rubber tree Rubber gatherers of Basilan A sheet of crepe rubber Jolo, the capital of the Sulu Archipelago A Bajao woman climbing to her home Moro dattos Bamboo water tube The Sultan of Sulu Pearl fisherman of the Sulu Sea Manila hemp Stripping the hemp Drying the abaca fibre Mat-weaving Bagobo man wearing a grass jacket A house in the tree-tops A Chinese schoolhouse The Chinese pier at Jolo Manila's Chinatown The port at Manila The Executive Building in Manila A session of the Philippine Legislature Where the Philippine laws are made Army and Navy Club at Manila A Filipino school boy Rugged shores of the Hawaiian Islands Waikiki Beach Pineapple fields Sugar-cane flumes Laying paper mulch for pineapples Scene on the island of Oahu Mt. Kilauea   A sampling of the author's writing... To-night I have been sitting in the Luneta, the great breathing place for Manila. As the sun dropped behind Mount Mariveles, the headland at the north entrance to Manila Bay, the sky flamed with a gorgeous colour. Gentle breezes from the ocean swept over the park and the lapping of the waves mingled with the murmur of talk or gave way before the stirring music of the military band. All Manila was out in full force, strolling about, chatting between numbers, sitting on benches or in cars and carriages. I have seldom seen so many motors parked at any Marine Band concert in Washington … [Read more...]

SEMINAR: Lameco Eskrima & Kali Ilustrisimo – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores, Frankfurt, Germany

Lameco Eskrima & Kali Ilustrisimo – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores/USA presented by Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany sponsored by JuWe-Sticks Nach der überwältigenden Resonanz nach dem letzten Kurzbesuch von Guro Dino freuen wir uns Ihn in 2012 für einen längeren Aufenthalt gewinnen zu können. Das Seminar bildet die Grundlage für ein tieferes Verständnis des Kali Ilustrisimo (CNR) und des Lameco Eskrima (SOG) sowie den Start von Kapisanang Mandirigma Germany. Thema wird sein: Kali Ilustrisimo (Single & Double Blade) – Lameco Eskrima (Single & Double Stick) Laßt euch die Gelegenheit Kali Ilustrisimo von einem der wenigen zertifizierten Instruktoren unter Master Christopher Ricketts sowie Punong Guro Edgar. G. Sulite zu lernen nicht entgehen. KOSTEN: 1 Tag 55€ – 2 Tage 100€ bei Zahlung vor 13.04.2012, danach plus 10€ Nachmeldegebühr Seminarort wird noch bekanntgegeben, voraussichtlich Frankfurt/Main. Bei Nichterscheinen verfällt die bereits gezahlte Seminargebühr. Der Veranstalter übernimmt für Personen- und Sachschäden keinerlei Haftung. Die Teilnahme erfolgt auf eigenes Risiko! … [Read more...]

BOOK: MAGAGANDANG SALAYSAY Andrea Amor Tablan & Ursula E. Calma, 1950

KALI ARNIS

Description: Interesting stories, from Philippine myths and legends. Some of the stories are: The first people on earth; Ang Inahin, Legend of Mayon, The butterfly and the worm, the airplane, Ang Mayaman at Mahirap. Illustrated, large fonts.  All stories are in Tagalog. Publisher: Philippine Book Co. 1950 Pages: 165     … [Read more...]

BOOK: Portfolio 1 – By Dr. Domingo Abella, 1977

5 arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima 5 arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima 5 arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima

Portfolio 1 By Dr. Domingo Abella   This is a very rare, large elephant sized book that was privately printed in 1977, a limited edition of 270 printed books. It is a compilation of many maps, photographs, drawings, and paintings about the Philippines. Some subjects include...  Filipinos and Filipinas, earliest Ptolomeo, Siglo II Impreso en Roma 1490 Mapa Universal de Ptolomeo to the 1785 Isole Filippine by Antonio Zattae, a 1734 Pedro Murillo Velarde map Carta Hydrographica y Chorographica de las Islas Filipinas, old Manila, 16th century armours of native warriors, Spanish conquistadores, early costumes, churches built by the Spanish missionaries, Mindanao and Zamboanga views, engravings of Nicholas dela Cruz Bagay and much more...   From Carlos Quirino’s introduction... “several years ago, Dr. Domingo Abella, who had just been appointed Director of the National Archives, … felt that maps of the Philippines should be given wider publication in this country. He borrowed a dozen of my original maps, and with a score of his own that he had copied in his many trips around the world, he had them reprinted in Taiwan where printing costs is much less than elsewhere. The present collection is the result of his diligent interest in this phase of the past of the Philippines. He has included reproductions of costumes used by Filipinos of long ago. In this collection therefore, the development of the Islands since the age of discovery can be readily traced. It is a valuable addition to any public or private library."   From Milagros Romualdez-Abella’s introduction (wife of Dr. Abella)... “This is a Limited Collection of Philippine maps gathered abroad during the 12 years of our search for primary sources of Philippine documents. Some reproductions are not very clear but they have been included to give the viewer an inkling of the cartography of that era. To the maps are added pictorials of costumes, official and unofficial, worn during the 18th century, buildings in Manila like Malacanang Palace, churches found in Intramuros during that period as well as views of Mindanao. This is a Limited Edition of 270 sets numbered from page 1 to 74.                                                                                 … [Read more...]

Book: 1898, Our New Possessions – Philippine Islands, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Hawaiian Islands by Trumbull White

4 arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima 4 arnis arnis kali kali eskrima eskrima

  Our New Possessions Four Volumes in One…Philippine Islands, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Hawaiian Islands by Trumbull White, Illustrated by numerous photos, First printing Edition (presumed,) 1898, A. B. Kuhlman Press Company Book Publisher Publishing, LCCC 00-0000,  9 X 7 inches, pp 676, Hard cover, Contents Vintage history book on the newest lands to the United States in 1898.  These lands were to have very different futures as two remain key elements of the US while two others are independent once again.  The real value and beauty of this book is in the huge number of vintage images and drawings from all four “possessions.” … [Read more...]

Book: The Collection of Primitive Weapons and Armor of the Philippine Islands in the United States National Museum by Herbert W. Krieger

ilustrisimo lameco ilustrisimo lameco

Plates from: Herbert W. Krieger's The Collection of Primitive Weapons and Armor of the Philippine Islands in the United States National Museum Smithsonian Institution; United States National Museum, Bulletin 137 (1926)   Plate 1. Philippine weapons of offense and defense. Spears, lances, and halberds. Bows, arrows, and arrow cases. Blowguns, darts, and dart cases. Clubbed weapons and shields. Hand weapons for piercing and stabbing. Bolos. Cutting and slashing blades. Swords for cutting and chopping. Beheading swords. Head axes. Straight and wavy krisses. Circular shields for parrying and targets. Oblong, pronged, clubbed, and tufted shields of hollowed wood. Body. armor of horn, hide, cordage, and fiber construction. Plate 2. Projectile weapons: Blowguns, bows, arrows and darts, quiver and dart case. No. 1. Palmwood bow; highly polished, grooved, concavo-convex self-bow. Negritos, Zambales Mountains, Island of Luzon. 2. Heavy palmwood self-bow; flat surfaces, slightly concave on inner side. Negritos, Negros, Visayan Island, P.I. 3. Palmwood bow wrapped with rattan. Bagobo, Mindanao. 4. Palmwood bow; cord of bamboo splint. Moro, Mindanao. 5. Bamboo blowgun: Surface decorated with burned spiral bands and rings; lining tube of reed, sight elevation. Batak, Island of Palawan, Philippine Archipelago. 6. Arrow case of bamboo provided with rattan basketry cap. Moro, western Mindanao. 7.Blowgun darts and dart case. Batak, Palawan Island. Plate 3. Simple and compound arrowheads of palmwood and bamboo. No. 1. Palmwood arrowhead and bamboo shaft. Moro, Mindanao. 2. Reed arrow with palmwood foreshaft. Moro, Mindanao. 3. Bamboo arrow with palmwood foreshaft; poisoned bamboo arrow point inserted in foreshaft. Bikol, Luzon. 4. Large arrow of bamboo with arrowhead of split bamboo, Bagobo, Mindanao. 5. Triagular shape arrowhead of bamboo, harpoon shaft. Negritos, Zambales Mouutains, Luzon. 6. Barbed, triangular bamboo arrowhead, harpoon shaft. Negritos, Zambales Mountains, Luzon Island. 7. Fish arrow with compound head of bamboo. Bagobo, Mindanao. 8. Three-pronged or trident compound arrow. Negritos. Zambales Mountains, Luzon. Plate 4. Metallic harpoon and arrowheads provided with barbed, hastate, three-pointed, harpoon, and composite points. Shaftments. No. 1. Short, flat, lanceolate arrowhead,designed to make a large wound and to cause profuse bleeding. Negritos Zambales Mountains. 2. Long, triangular, iron arrow point, palmwood foreshaft, unfeathered cane shaft. Moro, western Mindanao. 3. Small, lanceolate shape iron arrowhead, long bamboo shaft; heavy palmwood foreshaft, bulbous at the base. Old Bikol arrow type. 4. Leaf-shape arrow point of sheet copper, bamboo shaft, foreshaft of wood fast set in shaft with resin. Moro. 5. Feathered bamboo shaft, large lanceolate shape arrow point. Negritos, Luzon. 6. Leaf-shape iron arrowhead of excellent workmanship socketed on hardwood shaft, no foreshaft. Moro, Jolo Archipelago. 7. Large feathered bamboo shaft, hastate shape iron arrow point. Negritos, Luzon. 8. Small triangular iron head, palmwood foreshaft, reed shaft. Moro, Mindanao. 9. Ferruled wooden shaft, long hastate shape barbed iron arrow point. Moro. 10. Long quadrangular barbed iron arrowhead. Negritos, Luzon. 11-13. Composite arrow shaftments; feathered shaft provided with lanyard and retrieving cord, barbed toggle harpoon type of arrow point. Designed for hunting pigs. Negritos. Plate 5. Ceremonial, war, fishing, and hunting spears: Barbed, serpentine, harpoon, and compound types of iron and steel spearheads. No. 1. Hunting spear, harpoon type, bilaterally barbed. Moro, Mindanao. 2. Compound spearhead provided with three barbed prongs for use in fishing. Moro, Sulu Archipelago. 3. Serpentine form of steel spearhead socketed on palmwood shaft, shaft wound with plaited rattan and ferruled with brass. Mindanao. 4. Serpentine shape steel lance blade socketed on wooden shaft. Moro, Mindanao. 5. Iron war spear: Bilaterally recurved barbs, palmwood shaft wrapped with braided rattan, iron ferrule. 6. War spear: Hastate shape spear point provided with recurved guard barbs, metal tang inserted in hardwood shaft. Northern Luzon. 7-12. War spears: Multiple barbed iron spear points, short hardwood shafts, wrapped with braided rattan ferrules, iron cap or spud socketed on base of shafts. Igorot, northern Luzon. 11. Ceremonial spear provided with multiple barbs to frighten spirits or "anitos." Igorot, northern Luzon. Plate 6. Spears used ceremonially and in war; shafts ornamented and figured with brass and silver overlay. No. 1. Cane shaft, rough-surfaced iron blade of good form. Moro. 2. Elliptic spearhead of iron with socket. … [Read more...]

Book: Photographs from Harper’s History of the War in the Philippines

Ilustrisimo Lameco Arnis Eskrima Kali

  Harper's History of the War in the Philippines Edited by Marrion Wilcox Harper and Brothers, New York, 1900, first edition. Light brown cloth hard covers with red leather label on spine, gilt titles, large folio, 472pp, profusely illustrated with b&w photographs, many full-page color plates (chromolithographs), fold-out plate, maps A detailed and richly illustrated account of the background history and military campaigns of the War. The volume includes a listing of all the US soldiers by rank. Among the color  plates is an illustration  General Lawton by Frederic Remington.                           … [Read more...]

Ilustration: Early Sulu Warriors and Weapons & Ilanoan Warrior

www.mandirigma.org kali arnis eskrima

  … [Read more...]

Photograph: Moros fencing with shield and wooden barong : Jolo -1901

mandirigma.org mandirigma.org

Larawan: Philippine Photographs Digital Archive, Univ. of Michigan Via: Filipino weapons & history ("Filhistory")  … [Read more...]

The Filipino People – Early contacts of the Malays and Hindus, and the rise Islam

malays

Original Source: https://kahimyang.com/kauswagan/articles/792/the-filipino-people-early-contacts-of-the-malays-and-hindus-and-the-rise-islam The Filipino People - Early contacts of the Malays and Hindus, and the rise Islam   More than two thousand years ago, India produced a remarkable civilization. There were great cities of stone, magnificient palaces, a life of splendid luxury a highly organized social and political system. Writing known as Sanskrit have been developed. Two great religions, Brahminism and Buddhism, arose, the latter still the dominant religion of Tibet, China, and Japan. The people who produced this civilization are known as the Hindus. Fourteen or fifteen hundred years ago Hinduism spread over Burma, Siam, and Java. Great cities were erected with splendid temples and huge idols, the ruins of which still remain, though their magnificence has gone and they are covered today with the growth of the jungle. This powerful civilization of the Hindus, established thus in Malaysia, greatly affected the Malayan people on these islands, as well as those who came to the Philippines. Many words in the Tagalog have been shown to have a Sanskrit origin, and the systems of writing which the Spaniards found in use among several of the Filipino peoples had certainly been developed from the alphabet then in use among these Hindu peoples of Java. A few hundred years later another great change, due to religious faith, came over the Malayan race - a change which has had a great effect upon the history of the Philippines, and is still destined to modify events far into the future. This was the conversion to Islam. Of all the great religions of the world, Mohammedanism was the last to arise, and its career has in some ways been the most remarkable. Mohammed, its founder, was an Arab, born about 572 A.D. At that time Christianity was established entirely around the Mediterranean and throughout most of Europe, but Arabia was idolatrous. Mohammed was one of those great, prophetic souls which arise from time to time in the world's history. All he could learn from Hebraism and Christianity, together with the result of his own thought and prayers, led him to the belief in one God, the Almighty, the Compassionate, the Merciful, who as he believed would win all men to His knowledge through the teachings of Mohammed himself. Thus inspired, Mohammed became a teacher or prophet, and by the end of his life he had won his people to his faith and inaugurated one of the greatest eras of conquest the world has seen. The armies of Arabian horsemen, full of fanatical enthusiasm to convert the world to their faith, in a century's time wrested from Christendom all Judea, Syria, and Asia Minor, the sacred land where Jesus lived and taught, and the countries where Paul and the other apostles had first established Christianity. Thence they swept along the north coast of Africa, bringing to an end all that survived of Roman power and religion, and by 720 they had crossed into Europe and were in possession of Spain. For the nearly eight hundred years that followed, the Christian Spaniards fought to drive Islam from the peninsula, before they were successful. Not only did Islam move westward over Africa and Europe, it was carried eastward as well. Animated by their faith, the Arabs became the greatest sailors, explorers, merchants, and geographers of the age. They sailed from the Red Sea down the coast of Africa as far as Madagascar, and eastward to India, where they had settlements on both the Malabar and Coromandel coasts. Thence Arab missionaries brought their faith to Malaysia. At that time the true Malays, the tribe from which the common term "Malayan" has been derived, were a small people of Sumatra. At least as early as 1250 they were converted to Islam, brought to then by these Arabian missionaries, and under the impulse of this mighty faith they broke from their obscurity and commenced that great conquest and expansion that has diffused their power, language, and religion throughout the East Indies. A powerful Muslim Malay settlement was established on the western coasts of Borneo probably as early as 1400. The more primitive inhabitants, like the Dyaks, who were a tribe of the primitive Malayans, were defeated, and the possession of parts of the coast taken from them. From this coast of Borneo came many of the adventurers who were traversing the seas of the Philippines when the Spaniards arrived. The Muslim population of Mindanao and Jolo owes something certainly to this same Malay migration which founded the colony of Borneo. But the Magindanao and Illanon Moros seem to be largely descendants of primitive tribes, such as the Manobo and Tiruray, who were converted to Islam by Malay and Arab proselyters. The traditions of the Magindanao Moros ascribe their conversion to Kabunsuan, a native of Johore, the son of an Arab father and Malay mother. He came to Magindanao with a band of … [Read more...]

Protected: La Verdadera Destreza

footwork1

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Protected: La Verdadera Destreza, Jerónimo Sánchez de Carranza

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Protected: Geometry of Swordsmanship, Girard Thibault

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Rajah Sulaiman III, Last Muslim King of Manila (1558 – 1575) – Written in Tagalog by Jose N. Sevilla and Tolentino in the early 1920′s

kapisanang mandirigma

Rajah Suliman, Last Muslim King of Manila Rajah Sulaiman III (1558 - 1575) was the last native Muslim king of Manila, now the site of the capital of the Philippines, Manila. He was one of three chieftains, along with Rajah Rajah Lakandula and Adults, to have played a significant role in the Spanish conquests of the kingdoms of the Manila Bay-Pasig River area, first by Martín de Goiti, and Juan de Salcedo in 1570; and later by Miguel Lopez de Legazpi in 1571 The following biography of Rajah Soliman was written in Tagalog by Jose N. Sevilla and Tolentino in the early 1920s:     TALAMBUHAY NI RAHA SOLIMAN Bago nagíng̃ Rahá si Solimán, ay nagíng̃ katulong̃ muna sa pang̃ang̃asiwà ng̃ mg̃a súliranin dito sa Maynilà, ni Raháng̃ Matandâ. Si Lakán Dulà na nanánahanan sa Tundó ay siyá niyáng̃ kasama. Itó ay nang̃ kapanáhunan ni Raháng̃ Matandâ nang̃ taóng̃ 1570. Noón ay isáng̃ pulutóng̃ nang̃ mg̃a sasakyáng̃ kastilà na pinamumunuan ni Martin de Goití at Juan de Salcedo ang̃ dumaong̃ sa luók ng̃ Maynilà. Niyaóng̃ unang̃ datíng̃ dito niná Goití ay dî sila nakalunsád pagdaka. Ang̃ Maynilà, ay may matitibay na mg̃a muóg at sila'y pinaputukán at sinagupà. Nabalitaan niláng isá sa mg̃a makapang̃yarihan doón ay si Solimán, kaya't nagpadalá sina Goití rito ng̃ sugò na nagsásaysáy na silá'y dî naparito upáng̃ makidigmâ kundî upáng̃ makipagkásundô, at ang̃ ganitó'y tinugón sa pamamagitan ng̃ sugò, na ang̃ Hari sa Maynilà ay nagnanasà ng̃ makipagkaibigan sa mg̃a kastilà. Pagtang̃gáp ni Goití ng̃ paklí ni Solimán ay nasók siyá at ang̃ kanyáng̃ mg̃a tao sa ilog ng̃ Pasig at silá'y lumunsád sa isáng̃ baybáy na itinakdâ ng̃ Harì. Sinalubong̃ silá ni Raháng Matandâ at nakipagkamáy sa kanilá, pagkaliban ng̃ iláng̃ sandali ay dumatíng si Rahá Solimán at nakipágkamáy din ng̃uni't nagpasubalì ng̃ gayari: «Kamí ay nagnánasang̃ makipagkaibigan sa mg̃a kastilà samantalang̃ silá'y mabuti sa amin; ng̃uni't mahíhirapan silá ng̃ gaya ng̃ hirap na tiniís na ng̃ ibá, kailán ma't nasain niláng̃ kami'y alisán ng̃ puri». Pagkaraán ng̃ iláng̃ araw si Goití ay nagkulang̃ sa pagkakáibigan sa pagpapaputók ng̃ kaniláng̃ kanyón, at si Rahá Solimán ay napilitang̃ magbago ng̃ kilos. Ipinawasák nitó ang̃ mg̃a sasakyán nina Goití at ipinapuksâ ang̃ kanyáng̃ mg̃a kawal. Nápakabuti ang̃ pagtatang̃gól sa mg̃a kutà at dî nagawâ nang̃ mg̃a kastilà ang̃ makapasok agád, ng̃uni't nang̃ mang̃asalantà ang̃ mg̃a tao ni Solimán at maubos na ang̃ mg̃a punlô ay napipilan din. At nang̃ makuha ng̃ mg̃a kastilà ang̃ Maynilà ay sinalakay ang̃ bahay ni Solimán at dito'y nátagpuán nilá ang̃ isáng̃ mainam na gusali, maiinam na kasang̃kapang̃ sigay, mg̃a damit na mariring̃al na nagkakahalagá ng̃ may 23.000 piso. Hindî nagtaksíl kailán man si Solimán, gaya ng̃ ipinararatang̃ sa kanyá ng̃ mg̃a kastilà. Siyá'y tumupád lamáng̃ sa kanyáng̃ dakilang̃ katung̃kulan na makibaka sa sino mang̃ magnánasang̃ sumirà ng̃ kanyáng̃ kapuriháng̃ pagkaharì, at yáyamang̃ ang̃ mg̃a kastilà ay siyáng̃ nagpasimulâ ng̃ pagbabaka, ay siyá ay nagtang̃gól lamang̃ at natalo, ng̃uni't hindî kailán man nagtaksíl. Ang̃ kanyáng̃ pagibig sa sariling̃ Lupà ay nagudyók sa kanyáng̃ makibaka at siyá ay nakibaka dahil doón. Kung̃ saán mákikitang̃ ang pagguhò ng̃ kaharian ni Solimàn ay utang̃ sa kagahaman ng̃ isáng̃ lahing̃ mang̃aalipin; sa isáng̃ pámahalaáng̃ pinagágaláw ng̃ lakás ng̃ lakás at di ng̃ lakás ng̃ katuwiran. Kawawang̃ bayang̃ maliliít na linúlupig at ginágahasà ng̃ malalakíng bansâ. Ang̃ daigdíg ay patung̃o sa pagunlád, at buhat niyaóng̃ 1914 na gahasain ang̃ Belhika, ang malalakíng̃ Bansâ ay nagsasapì at ipinagtang̃gól ang̃ katwiran ng̃ maliliít na bayan. Panibagong̃ kilos sa daigdíg na bung̃a ng̃ mayamang̃ diwà ng̃ dakilang̃ Wilson sa kaamerikahan.   … [Read more...]

Book: Estudio de los antiguos alfabetos filipinos by Cipriano Marcilla y Martín (1895)

mandirigma.org

Estudio de los antiguos alfabetos filipinos (1895) Author: Cipriano Marcilla y Martín Publisher: Tipo-litografia del asilo de huérfanos Year: 1895 Language: Spanish … [Read more...]

Colt Artillery Model 1873 Single Action Army(SAA) .45 – Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg

kali arnis escrima eskrima kris kampilan rattan balisong, kali arnis escrima eskrima kris kampilan rattan balisong

  Colt Artillery Model 1873 Single Action Army(SAA) .45 - Barrel Length: 7" and 5½" - Weight: 2.3 lbs - Cartridge Caliber: .45 Long Colt (255 grain) - Muzzle Velocity: 830 fps - Service: 1873–1902 The Colt SAA .45 became the side arm issued to US Army in 1873. The Colt .45 revolver was considered cutting edge technology at the time. The large caliber was believed to quell conflicts and bring peace. It became known as the "Peacemaker". It would be the most popular revolver of the old west. Today it remains synonymous with the Cowboys of the western frontier. The original Colt SAA issued to troops had the 7" barrel. By early 1890s the US Army decided to downsize their force as well as find ways to save on spending. By 1893 many of the Colt SAA revolvers were replaced by the Colt DA .38. It should be noted the phasing out of the Colt SAA .45 was a long process and many still found use as the side arm of select few units. By 1898 the Colt revolvers were modified with a shorter 5½" and issued first to Artillery units. The altered Colts with 5½" barrels would be known and later called the "Artillery Model". The most popular unit to carry the old Colt .45 SAA would be Teddy Roosevelts Rough Riders during the Cuban Campaign. The Colt SAA .45 would truly shine just as the the Philippine-American War was coming to a close and the beginning of the pacification through out the Philippines; most particularly during patrols and expeditions in the Visayan and Moroland(Mindanao) regions. The Colt .38 revolvers provided to be insufficient in stopping and dropping frantically charged assailants. Few regulars and volunteers still carried the older Colt SAA .45 and noted the significant stopping and knock-down power the revolver had over the newer .38s. Officers soon requested an immediate re-issue of old Colt SAA .45s to the Philippine Islands. Because the Colt SAA .45 would still be used in service all the way up to the end of the Philippine-American War, it would be safe to say the Colt .45 was never truly retired in 1893. By the end of 1902 the Philippine-American War closed and the US volunteers began mustering out of service. As US troop presences began to drop in the Philippines, Tafts Philippine Commission would establish a native police force known as the Philippine Constabulary to fill the roll of bring law and order through out the islands. The Philippine Constabulary would be issued the old 1878 Colt Alaskan .45 revolver, which would be re-designated the Colt 1902 Philippine Model. Resulting from the effective use of the Colt Single Action Army .45. Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg … [Read more...]

Colt 1902 Philippine Model Double Action .45LC – Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg

kali arnis escrima eskrima kapisanang mandirigma, kali arnis escrima eskrima kapisanang mandirigma

  Colt 1902 Philippine Model Double Action .45LC Originally issued as: 1878 Colt Alaskan Revolver Barrel length: 6" Capacity: 6 round swing out cylinder Cartridge Caliber: .45 LC(Long Colt) Weight: 2 lbs Service: 1878-1892; 1902-1908 Adopted earlier in 1878 by US soldiers serving in Alaska, the pistol was nearly phased out by the new issued .38 revolvers. At the end of the Philippine-American War the Philippine Scouts, along with US military units, and the Philippine Constabulary(Native Police force) began expeditions and patrolling through Moroland and Visayan territory. There they found new adversaries waiting and lurking in the dense terrain of both regions, namely the Tad-Tad/Pulajanes of Samar/Leyte and the Juramentado Moros. The native police force were poorly equipped with Springfield Trapdoor "single shot" rifles, and a ill performing .38 Colt revolver side arm. Both proved to have insufficient stopping power of a hard charging swarm of combatants. A shot assailant does not necessarily make them incapacitated. Sword welding Moros and Filipinos were known to charge through heavy gun fire and still be capable of slashing and killing. Requests were quickly made for older issued .45 Colt revolvers, and the US government answered by reissuing out the older 1878 Alaskan Colt Revolvers to the Philippine Constabulary, re-designating them the 1902 Philippine Model. The .45 revolvers performed up to standard and as expected. The stopping power of the .45 cartridge against Filipinos during this era would result in the US government requesting their newly manufactured and issued sidearm to be chambered in .45. The end result is the M1911 Colt automatic pistol chambered in the newly engineered .45ACP cartridge. The Model 1902 revolver is unique by the enlarged trigger guard. At the time the new smokeless powder cartridges also required new primers, which took more effort to ignite; and with it required a stronger trigger spring. The trigger pull became immense. Colt modified the trigger group by use of the enlarged trigger guard, which gave more leverage to pull the trigger. Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg   … [Read more...]

895 Gatling Gun, 1873-1906 – Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg

kali arnis eskrima escrima arnis fma filipino martial arts phillipines kapisanang mandirigma

  895 Gatling Gun Weight: 395 lbs Barrel length: 32" (6-10 barrels) Cartridge Caliber: .30 cal and 45-70 Range: +1000 yards Rate fire: 600-1000 per minute Service: 1873-1906 Invented by American Dr. Richard Jordan Gatling(neighbor of the Colt family in Hartford Connecticut), the Gatling gun is considered by many to be the first machine gun. It was first introduced during the Civil War in 1865. Several different models existed through out its advent. 6 to 10 barrels are positioned in a cylinder. Each barrel having its own chamber and firing mechanism. Ammunition is placed in a magazine canister and attached on top of the cylinder breech. A crank would be operated by the gunner, which would rotate the cylinder and barrels. The rotation loaded, cocked, fired, and ejected spent cartridges. The Gatling gun initially suffered many issues, as nearly all were hand built at the time and many parts were not uniform. By the 1890s, the Gatling gun had significantly improved, and in 1895 the US Army adopted the weapon. The Gatling gun saw much action during the Spanish American War. It gained fame in Cuba giving support fire while Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders assaulted San Juan Hill. Several examples were later shipped and used in the war in the Philippines. Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg   … [Read more...]

M1899 Philippine Constabulary Krag-Jørgensen Carbine Rifle – Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg

kali escrima eskrima arnis fma filipino philippines

M1899 Philippine Constabulary Krag-Jørgensen Carbine Rifle - Bolt Action - Capacity: 5 round internal box magazine - Cartridge Caliber: .30-40 Krag (US Krags) Smokeless - Service: 1906-1917 The Philippine Constabulary were the native police established in 1902 by Tafts Philippine Commission which oversaw civil affairs of the Philippine Islands. It should be noted the PC's were not soldiers as many confused them to be; they were law enforcement officers paid the Civil Philippine Commission. The Philippine Constabulary were originally issued old US military stock Springfield Trapdoor single-shot 45 rifles from the Indian Wars. During the pacification of the islands after the Phil-Am War, the Trapdoor rifle proved to be inferior when fighting in the dense terrains of the Visayas and Mindanao regions where combatants would rush out in hoards. After the first initial shot, reloading another round became near impossible. As many PC inspectors complained: the Trapdoor rifle became a one shot club. The Springfield Trapdoors were later replaced by the Krag Carbines in early 1906. Unique to only the Philippines, the Krag full length rifles were modified and cut down to a shorter size at the POD(Philippine Ordnance Depot) in Intramurous. The Krag Carbine was also short lived, they would later be replaced by Springfield M1903 rifles by 1910(but Krags would still be in service until 1917). Less than a handful of these Philippine Constabulary Krag Carbines exist today. Making them the mostly highly sought after and prized rifle of all Krag models by gun collectors and   Springfield Krag Jørgensen Rifle - Manufactured: Springfield Armory(under license by Krag Jørgensen) - Design: Norwegian - Weight: 8.6lb - Length: 49" - Barrel length: 30" - Cartridge Caliber: 30-40 Krag Smokeless - Capacity: 5 round internal box magazine - Service in US Army: 1892-1903 - Service in Philippine Constabulary: 1906-1917 The US Army adopted the Krag rifle in 1892. Springfield would produce several different variants of the Krag from 1892 to 1899 at their plant in Massachusetts. An estimated 500,000 rifles were produced at Springfield Armory. Production ceased in 1904. The Krag would be the rifle credited for winning the Spanish American War, as well as the Philippine American War. It still remains synonymous to the Span-Am War era. The Krag how ever was very short lived. It only saw two short wars and was already proven to be outclassed, out matched, and obsolete during the first war. The Spanish Mauser proved to be a better all around performer, as well as being a more robust war rifle than the Krag. Loading the Krag was also tedious, as it required loading one round at a time in to the box magazine, where as the Spanish Mauser took 5 round stripper clips that allowed for extremely fast reload. The Mauser was the superior rifle of the two wars, but the American soldiers outnumbered and out-gunned the Spanish and Filipino soldiers armed with Mausers. By 1901 Springfield had developed a new and improved battle rifle that incorporated features and characteristics of both the Spanish Mauser as well as the Krag. The US Army soon adopted Springfields new rifle and named it the M1903. The M1903 were quickly mass produced and outfitted to US Regulars. The Krags however would still find a niche in service. By 1905 the Krags would be re-issued to the Philippine Constabulary and other provincial police departments around the Philippines. Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg   … [Read more...]

Spanish Mauser Model 1893 Bolt Action Rifle – Researched and written by Dnvzs Zjzllg

kapisanang mandirigma, kapisanang mandirigma

  Spanish Mauser Model 1893 Bolt Action Rifle - Manufactured: Loewe Berlin Germany - Weight: 8.6lb - Barrel length: 29" - Cartridge Caliber: 7mm (7x57mm) Smokeless - Service in Spanish Army: Since 1893 The 1893 Mauser bolt action rifle is considered by many to be one of the most revolutionary firearms in history and way ahead of it's era. Accuracy of the rifle being unmatched during its time. The Mauser rifle saw little improvements to its design through out its service. It would be used by nearly all countries up to and during the second world war. Even by todays standards it is considered extremely accurate next to modern firearms. Nearly all bolt action rifles produced today take some design from the Mauser rifle. The 7mm round created a distinctive sound when whizzing by, the American soldiers called it the "Spanish Hornet". Spain contracted Mauser in Loewe Berlin to produce these rifles for their entire military in the early 1890s. The Mauser were to replace outdated rifles like the Remington Rolling Block. The Mauser later shined and gained an infamous reputation during the Spanish American War at Cuba. The Battle of San Juan Hill would be the most famous battle of the Spanish-American War, as well as being the turning point of the war. 800 Spanish soldiers held the hill against an opposing force made up of nearly 20,000 armed men. 15,000 being made of US Soldiers armed with Krags and Springfield Trapdoor rifles. Although the fight lasted only 2 days and the US gained control of the hill, the end result was near disastrous for the Americans. 200 US soldiers lay dead with 1,100 being wounded. The Spanish resulted in only 58 deaths and 170 wounded. The Spanish Mauser rifle was quickly noted by the US military and the US government for its lethality and superiority in this one battle. At the same time in the Philippines, the 2nd phase of the Revolution was in motion and the Philippine Army trampled across the Spanish troops through out the islands. The Filipinos began to equip themselves with captured and left over Spanish firearms. They would also account for the superior performance in the Mauser. Each battalion would have a separate special unit of expert riflemen/snipers(known as Tiradors); and all were to be armed with nothing but Mauser rifles. The most popular Filipino riflemen unit being under the command of General Geronimo, whom he would name "Tiradores de la Muerte"(Shooters of Death). After the outbreak of the Philippine American War, the Tiradores de la Muerte would gain fame in Dec 1899 when the unit defended the town of San Mateo against 800 US troops under the command of Gen Henry Lawton. On the morning of the battle Lawton walked along the firing line in open field to gain a better view of his troops and the opposing force. The troops noted the distinct firing sound of the Mauser rifles and advised the general to take cover. The general ignored their warning and at that instant was struck in the chest by round fired by one of the tiradores Mauser rifle. Gen Lawton would die with in a few minutes. The rifle shot coming from a distance of 300 yards during a storm with rain. Also during the Spanish American War in the Philippines, in the town of Baler a small detachment of 50 Spanish soldiers barracked themselves inside the towns fortified church. Lt Col Teodorico Luna(relative of Juan and Antonio Luna) would lead the attack against the Spaniards and surrounded the church. The Spaniards would hold this position from July 1898 to June 1899. During their stand, the Spanish American War would end, America would purchase the islands, and Philippine American War was in full swing. The Spanish troops finally surrendered to the Philippine Army and were received as friendly allies. The dominance of the Mauser rifle was accredited for the 11 month long stand off. Due to the superiority and success of the Mauser rifle over the newly issued Krag rifles through out the Spanish American War, the US Government took captured Mausers and gave them to Springfield Armory for their own research and development. The US Government would give Springfield Armory the order to build their own Mauser type rifle. In 1900 Springfield had a prototype rifle with similar characteristics of both the Mauser and Krag rifle. The US Government approved the design, and the end result is the M1903 Springfield bolt action rifle in 30-06. It should be noted that Springfield Armory at the time was under government control, but in itself was still a separate entity as a firearms manufacturer. The US Government in a way did not purposely copy the designs, but being Springfield Armory fell under the control of the US Government, Mauser took action against the US government and not Springfield Armory. Both Mauser and the US Government realized the similar features and agreed it infringed on Mausers design patents. The US Government … [Read more...]

U.S. Army: 11 Infantry Regiment. Insignia with Philippine Bolo and Kampilan Swords (March 28 1923) – By The Institute of Heraldry

U.S. Army: 11 Infantry Regiment By The Institute of Heraldry Distinctive Unit Insignia   Description A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, Satanta's arrow in fess Argent between in chief a castle Or in base a kampilan and bolo in saltire of the second hilted of the third. On a chief embattled of the second a cross Gules. Symbolism The symbolism is that of the coat of arms. Background The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 28 Mar 1923. Coat Of Arms   Blazon Shield Azure, Satanta's arrow in fess Argent between in chief a castle Or in base a kampilan and bolo in saltire of the second hilted of the third. On a chief embattled of the second a cross Gules. Crest On a wreath of the colors a fusil Gules bearing a cross patée Argent charged with an acorn of the first. Motto SEMPER FIDELIS (Always Faithful). Symbolism The shield is blue for infantry. Service in the Spanish War is shown by the castle and in the Indian Wars by Satanta's "arrow." The most important Indian campaign of this regiment was against the Kiowas, Comanches and Cheyenne in 1874. Satanta was a noted Kiowa chief who died just previous to this campaign. His "arrow" was really a spear with feathers on the end and a handle. The kampilan and bolo represent engagements against the Moros of Mindanao and the Filipinos of the Visayas. Service in the World War is shown by the chief bearing the cross of the ancient Lords of Dun to commemorate the crossing of the Meuse at Dun. The embattled partition represents the siege of Chattanooga in 1863. The crest consists of the Civil War badges of the 1st Division, 14th Army Corps and 2d Division, 5th Army Corps, and the World War 5th Division shoulder sleeve insignia. Background The coat of arms was approved on 12 Oct 1920.   … [Read more...]

Apolinario ‘Lumpo’ Mabini y Maranan – Conscience of the Philippine Revolution (July 23, 1864 — May 13, 1903)

kali arnis eskrima escrima philippines kali arnis eskrima escrima philippines

Apolinario Mabini Hero of the Philippine Revolution Conscience  of the Philippine Revolution the Sublime Paralytic key adviser of Emilio Aguinaldo proposed the first constitution of the Philippine Republic born July 22, 1864 Barrio Talaga, Tanawan Batangas to Inocencio Mabini, Dionisia Maranan died May 13, 1903 It was immediately before the proclamation of independence that a young man was brought before Aguinaldo as his adviser. He was Apolinario Mabini. Born of very poor parents, Inocencio Mabini and Dionisia Maranan, in Talaga, Tanawan, Batangas. Mabini studied in a school in Tanawan, then conducted by a certain Simplicio Avelino. Much later, he transferred to a school conducted by the famous pedagogue, Father Valerio Malabanan. He continued his studies at the San Juan de Letran and at the University of Sto. Tomas where he received his law degree in 1894. His dream to defend the poor led him to forsake the priesthood, which his mother wanted him to take. Early in 1896, he contracted an illness, probably infantile paralysis, that led to the paralysis of his lower limbs. When the revolution broke out the same year, the Spanish authorities, suspecting that he was somehow involved in the disturbance, arrested him. The fact, however, that he could not move his lower limbs showed the Spaniards that they had made a mistake. He was released and sent to the San Juan de Dios Hospital. Mabini, it must be noted, was not entirely free from nationalistic association, for he was a member of Rizal's La Liga Filipina and worked secretly for the introduction of reforms in the administration of government. In 1898, while vacationing in Los Baños, Aguinaldo sent for him. It took hundreds of men taking turns at carrying the hammock he was in to bring Mabini to Kawit. Aguinaldo, upon seeing Mabini's physical condition, thought that he must have made a mistake in calling for him to help him in his work. What could a man in such a condition do to help him? But when Mabini spoke, Aguinaldo's doubts vanished. There was firmness in the sick man's voice, and Aguinaldo decided to make him his trusted adviser. From then on, it was Mabini who stood behind Aguinaldo. Envious enemies called him the "Dark Chamber of the President", but his admirers called him the "Brains of the Revolution". History of the Filipino People. Teodoro A. Agoncillo   --- Apolinario Mabini Born of a poor family, Apolinario Mabini was always studious. He was always sad and silent and liked to sit alone to meditate. Mabini studied at San Juan de Letran where he got his Bachelor of Arts degree and Professor of Latin. He also finished Law. He was a spokesman of the Congress, and a notary public. In early 1896, he contracted a severe fever which paralyzed him for the rest of his life. He was later called the Sublime Paralytic. Mabini was most active in the revolution in 1898, when he became the chief adviser of Gen. Aguinaldo during the revolution. He drafted decrees and proposed a constitution for the Philippine Republic. He made the plans for the revolutionary government. In 1899, he was captured by the Americans but was later set free. In 1901, he was exiled to Guam but returned to the Philippines in 1903 after agreeing to take an oath of allegiance to the US. He took his oath on February 26, 1903 before the Collector of Customs. On May 13, 1903, he died of cholera in Manila. Excerpts from Talambuhay ng mga Bayani by Rene Alba   --- Apolinario 'Lumpo' Mabini y Maranan (July 23, 1864 — May 13, 1903) Apolinario 'Lumpo' Mabini y Maranan (July 23, 1864 — May 13, 1903) was a Filipino political philosopher and revolutionary who wrote a constitutional plan for the first Philippine republic of 1899-1901, and served as its first prime minister in 1899. In Philippine history texts, he is often referred to as "the Sublime Paralytic", and as "the Brains of the Revolution." To his enemies and detractors, he is referred to as the "Dark Chamber of the President."   Early life of Apolinario Mabini Mabini was born on July 23, 1864 in Barangay Talaga in Tanauan, Batangas. He was the second of eight children of Dionisia Maranan, a vendor in the Tanauan market, and Inocencio Mabini, an unlettered peasant. Mabini began informal studies under his maternal grandfather, who was the village teacher. Because he demonstrated uncommon intelligence, he was transferred to a regular school owned by Simplicio Avelino, where he worked as a houseboy, and also took odd jobs from a local tailor - all in exchange for free board and lodging. He later transferred to a school conducted by the Fray Valerio Malabanan, whose fame as an educator merited a mention in José Rizal's novel El Filibusterismo. In 1881 Mabini received a scholarship to go to the Colegio de San Juan de Letran in Manila. An anecdote about his stay there says that a professor there decided to pick on him because his shabby … [Read more...]

U.S. Army: 15th Cavalry Regiment. Insignia with Philippine Kris and Kampilan Sword. (6 April 1935) – By The Institute of Heraldry

15th Cavalry Regiment   Distinctive Unit Insignia   Description A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess Gules and Argent in chief a lion passant Or and in base a kris and kampilan saltirewise Sable fimbriated Or. Attached below and to the left of the shield a Gold turning scroll inscribed "TOUS POUR UN" in Red letters. And attached below and to the right of the shield a Gold turning scroll inscribed "UN POUR TOUS" in Red letters. Symbolism The red and white divided shield represents the old Cavalry guidon. The regiment saw good fighting in the Philippines as indicated by the crossed kris and kampilan of the Moro and Lake Lanao campaigns. In the war with Germany, the regiment was in France in the vicinity of Bordeaux and the golden lion is taken from the arms of that city. The translation of the motto "All for one, one for all" is indicative of the spirit , which has made the regiment. Background The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 15th Cavalry on 6 April 1935. It was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized on 10 November 1944. It was redesignated on 21 January 1948, for the 15th Constabulary Squadron. The insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 28 November 1958. It was redesignated for the 15th Armor on 13 November 1963. The distinctive unit insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 2 August 1968. The insignia was amended to correct the description on 4 October 2002. Coat Of Arms   Blazon Shield Per fess Gules and Argent in chief a lion passant Or and in base a kris and kampilan saltirewise of the first hilted Sable. Crest On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules a setting sun behind "the Golden Gate" all Proper. Motto TOUS POUR UN, UN POUR TOUS (All For One, One For All). Symbolism Shield The red and white divided shield represents the old Cavalry guidon. The regiment saw good fighting in the Philippines as indicated by the crossed kris and kampilan of the Moro and Lake Lanao campaigns. In the war with Germany, the regiment was in France in the vicinity of Bordeaux and the golden lion is taken from the arms of that city. The translation of the motto "All for one, one for all" is indicative of the spirit , which has made the regiment. Crest The "Golden Gate" is the portico called "through the portals of the past" which is now in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. It was one of the few things left standing after the fire of 1906 and was removed and reerected as noted. The birthplace of the regiment is indicated by the crest. Background The coat of arms was originally approved for the 15th Cavalry on 2 November 1921. It was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron on 10 November 1944. It was redesignated on 21 January 1948, for the 15th Constabulary Squadron. The insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 28 November 1958. It was redesignated for the 15th Armor on 13 November 1963. The coat of arms was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 2 August 1968.   … [Read more...]

U.S. Army: 112 Military Police Battalion. Insignia with Barong Sword. (13 December 1968) – By The Institute of Heraldry

112 Military Police Battalion   Distinctive Unit Insignia   Description A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in width consisting of a red and blue arrowhead surmounted by a spearhead of white affixed to a green shaft; overall two silver color metal Barongs in saltire. Attached below the device a silver metal scroll inscribed “GUARDIANS OF HONOUR” in black letters. Symbolism The arrowhead alludes to New Guinea, World War II. The spearhead, representative of the arrowhead on the campaign streamer, is indicative of the Battalion’s participation in the assault landing on New Guinea. The crossed Barongs refer to service in the Philippines, World War II. The colors red, white, and blue represent the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded the unit for service in World War II. The blue area is also commemorative of the Distinguished Unit Citation awarded the Battalion. The green is the color of the Military Police Corps. The upright position of the spear further alludes to the capabilities of the Battalion in their current mission. Background The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 13 December 1968. Coat Of Arms   Blazon Shield Or, an arrowhead point up per pale Gules and Azure surmounted by a spear, palewise point to chief Vert fimbriated Argent barb of the last, overall a pair of Barongs in saltire of the like, all within a bordure Green. Crest That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Vert, a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable. Motto GUARDIANS OF HONOUR. Symbolism Shield The arrowhead and spear, representative of the arrowhead on the campaign streamer, is indicative of the Battalion’s participation in the assault landing on New Guinea during World War II. The crossed Barongs refer to service in the Philippines, World War II. The colors red, white, and blue represent the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded the unit for service in World War II. The blue area is also commemorative of the Presidential Unit Citation awarded the Battalion. Green is the color of the Military Police Corps. The upright position of the spear further alludes to the capabilities of the Battalion in their current mission. Crest The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard. Background The coat of arms was approved on 26 January 1998. The insignia was amended to correct the spelling of the motto on 29 January 2009.   … [Read more...]

U.S. Army: 138 Signal Battalion. Insignia with 3 Kampilans. (20 Feb 1962)

138 Signal Battalion   Distinctive Unit Insignia   Description A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield emblazoned: Per pale Tenné and Sable, a pile between a mullet of eight points and three kampilans bendwise in pale Argent. Attached below the shield a silver motto scroll inscribed "SUCCESS OF COMMAND" in black letters. Symbolism Orange and white are the colors used by the Signal Corps. The three kampilans represent the unit’s campaign service in the Philippines and the star is for the award of the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The searchlight in center suggests one of the functions of the unit. Background The distinctive unit insignia was approved 20 Feb 1962. Coat Of Arms   Blazon Shield Per pale Tenné and Sable, a pile between a mullet of eight points and three kampilans bendwise in pale Argent. Crest That for the regiments and separate battalion of the Indiana National Guard: On a wreath of the colors, Argent and Tenné, a demi-lion rampant Argent, holding in dexter paw a laurel branch Vert. Motto SUCCESS OF COMMAND Symbolism Orange and white are the colors used by the Signal Corps. The three kampilans represent the unit’s campaign service in the Philippines and the star is for the award of the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The searchlight in center suggests one of the functions of the unit. Background The coat of arms was approved on 20 Feb 1962.   … [Read more...]

United States Military Philippines Command. Philippines Department Insignia. (July 8, 1922) – By The Institute of Heraldry

Philippine Command By The Institute of Heraldry   Shoulder Sleeve Insignia   Description On a blue oval 2 1/2 inches in length by 2 inches in width a white sea lion brandishing a sword in its right paw. Symbolism The sea lion is from the coat of arms of Spain (Aragon) and suggest the Spanish heritage as well as the maritime nature of the area where the command was operational. Background The insignia was originally approved for the Philippines Department on July 8, 1922. It was redesignated for the Philippines-Ryukyus Command on August 14, 1947 and redesignated for the Philippines Command on August 1, 1949. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-54) … [Read more...]

U.S. Army: 11 Infantry Regiment. Insignia with Philippine Bolo and Kampilan Swords (March 28 1923) – By The Institute of Heraldry

U.S. Army: 11 Infantry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia   Description A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, Satanta's arrow in fess Argent between in chief a castle Or in base a kampilan and bolo in saltire of the second hilted of the third. On a chief embattled of the second a cross Gules. Symbolism The symbolism is that of the coat of arms. Background The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 28 Mar 1923. Coat Of Arms   Blazon Shield Azure, Satanta's arrow in fess Argent between in chief a castle Or in base a kampilan and bolo in saltire of the second hilted of the third. On a chief embattled of the second a cross Gules. Crest On a wreath of the colors a fusil Gules bearing a cross patée Argent charged with an acorn of the first. Motto SEMPER FIDELIS (Always Faithful). Symbolism The shield is blue for infantry. Service in the Spanish War is shown by the castle and in the Indian Wars by Satanta's "arrow." The most important Indian campaign of this regiment was against the Kiowas, Comanches and Cheyenne in 1874. Satanta was a noted Kiowa chief who died just previous to this campaign. His "arrow" was really a spear with feathers on the end and a handle. The kampilan and bolo represent engagements against the Moros of Mindanao and the Filipinos of the Visayas. Service in the World War is shown by the chief bearing the cross of the ancient Lords of Dun to commemorate the crossing of the Meuse at Dun. The embattled partition represents the siege of Chattanooga in 1863. The crest consists of the Civil War badges of the 1st Division, 14th Army Corps and 2d Division, 5th Army Corps, and the World War 5th Division shoulder sleeve insignia. Background The coat of arms was approved on 12 Oct 1920.   … [Read more...]

Katipunero: Emilio Jacinto. The “Brains of the Katipunan.” (15 December 1875 – 16 April 1899).

  Katipunero: Emilio Jacinto. Revolutionary and writer. Emilio Jacinto y Dizon was considered as one of the greatest military genius during his time. He was very close to Andres Bonifacio. Like Bonifacio, Emilio also comes from a poor family. He was born in Trozo, Manila on December 15,1875. His parents were Mariano Jacinto and Josefa Dizon. Despite being orphaned, he managed to send himself to Colegio de San Juan de Letran. He was also able to study law at the University of Santo Tomas although he was not able to finish it because his Spanish classmates often abused him. Emilio was only 19 when he joined the Katipunan. He was known as the brains of the Katipunan when it comes to military matters. His book entitled Kartilya was the one used by the Katipuneros as their guide in fighting the Spanish colonizers. It contained the constitution and by-laws ofthe Katipunan. Reading books was one of Emilio's greatest passions. One of his favorite books was the one about the French Revolution. He also has in his collection a book on how to make gunpowder and dynamite. He also learned quite a few things about the art of war, military strategies and ways of making weapons of war. --- Emilio Jacinto – Utak ng Katipunan Si Emilio Jacinto ay anak nila Mariano Jacinto at Josefa Dizon. Namatay agad ang kanyang ama ilang sandali lamang matapos na siya ay isilang na nagtulak sa kanyang ina na ipaampon si Emilio sa kanyang tiyuhin na si Don Jose Dizon upang magkaroon ng magandang buhay. Si Emilio ay bihasa sa pagsasalita ng Tagalog at Kastila pero mas gusto niya ang Kastila. Siya ay nag-aral sa Kolehiyo ng San Juan de Letran at nang maglaon ay lumipat sa Pamantasan ng Sto. Tomas para mag-aral ng batas. Hindi niya natapos ang kurso at sa edad na 20 ay sumapi siya sa isang sikretong samahan na ang pangalan ay Katipunan. Nang mamatay si Bonifacio, ipinagpatuloy ni Jacinto ang paglaban sa mga Kastila bagamat hindi siya sumali sa puwersa ni Aguinaldo. Namatay si Emilio Jacinto sa sakit na malaria noong Abril 16, 1899 sa Majayjay, Laguna sa edad na 23. Dr. Jose Rizal and Marcelo H. Del Pilar inspired him to be a good writer during his time. He used Dimes Haw as his pen name. He also wrote A la Patria, which he based from Dr. Jose Rizal's Mi Ultimo Adios. He was seriously injured in one bloody encounter that resulted to his death on April 16,1899 in Majayjay, Laguna at a young age of 24.   Known as the "Brains of the Katipunan", Emilio Jacinto was born in Trozo, Tondo, Manila, on Dec 15,1875. He was the son of Mariano Jacinto and Josefa Dizon. He was fluent in both Spanish and Tagalog, but he spoke more in Spanish. He studied in the Universidad de Santo Tomas, but did not finish college and at 20 joined the Katipunan. Because he was very brilliant, he became the advisor on fiscal matters and secretary to Andres Bonifacio. He also edited and wrote for the Katipunan newspaper "Kalayaan"--Freedom in Tagalog. He wrote in the newspaper under the pen name Dimasilaw, and in the Katipunan he was called Pingkian. Emilio Jacinto was the author of the Kartilya ng Katipunan. After Andres Bonifacio's death, he continued fighting the Spaniards.     The appointment paper of Emilio Jacinto as commander-in-chief of the revolutionary forces north of Manila, signed by Andres Bonifacio as “Pangulo ng Haring Bayang Katagalugan.” The letterhead cites Bonifacio as having founded the Katipunan and initiated the revolution. (ENE Collection)   … [Read more...]

Film: Watawat. Movie recalls the creation of the Philippine flag. Philippines -2010

kali, arnis, eskrima, escrima, guro dino

  Watawat recalls the creation of the Philippine flag Also entered were actors James Blanco Carlos Morales and the appropriate-produced films. And not just ordinary this movie in terms of genre because it is a period movie titled Flag. Aside from being executive producers Carlos and James Flag, they also perform in the film as the Philippine national heroes. General Emilio Carlos plays Aguinaldao, while James also plays the role of Andres Bonifacio. From Ghalaxy Cinecilio Pictures and Film Productions, the film said the film debut of first-time director Dave Cecilio and two of them Deo Divinagracia the creation of stories. Features in this period film about the creation of the Philippine flag and how it became part of Philippine history. The other cast members of film were Chin-Chin Gutierrez, FAMAS awardee, Mercedes Cabral, Kisza Divinagracia. Those three women performing naghabi of the first flag of the Philippines. Among the cast as well as the flag were Monsour del Rosario, Justin Cuyugan, Mosang, Dan Fernnadez, Angie Ferro, Nathan Lopez, Maricar Madrid, Mara Lopez, Gigi Pirote, Dick Lindayag, Herminia Concpecion, and Fria Rivas. On December 12, 2009 had a trial screening at the University of the Philippines Baguio. Although the film is still raw pina preview it there, as requested. January 2010 now officially start actually present at screenings and walks of people in the movie production. Among the schools and universities is the Baguio Colleges Foundation, University of Baguio, UP Baguio, University of Cordillera, STI College, Colleges Data Center, St. Louis University, etc.. If you can not change the schedule, the target is screening this January 15-21 in Olongapo City area and also OCNHS Like the fourteen (14) public elementary and high schools in Sta.Rita and Subic, etc. Theater SUMVAC held it in Subic Freeport Zone. In February, it also targets to tour Bohol and Nueva Ecija, in March in Cebu and Davao and international screenings also plans soon. Synopsis: This is a journey in the past. The Flag (Flag) is pagsasapelikula a part in the history of the Philippines at the time made ​​the symbol of freedom for the declaration of the First Republic the country. Symbol generated in an effort by Doña Marcela Agoncillo (Chin Chin Gutierrez) based on the request of General Emilio Aguinaldo (Carlos Morales) to create colors. They did it while they live in Hong Kong was caused by the occupation of Spain. There are five days Mrs. Marcela hinahabi also the standard, a partner with his son Enchang (Kisza Divinagracia) and Delfina Natividad (Mercedes Cabral). Obrang generated here represent a shape, color, and the image of courage and truth behind the efforts to achieve a desired freedom. Source of multicolor colors. Red, blue, black white and yellow. Taut the outbreak of the Association was against the repressive foreigners. Became the leader of the revolt were Dagohoy and Diego Silang until developed by Andres Bonifacio (James Blanco) the Katipunan. Also resulted in agreement by Aguinaldo Pakto of Biak-na-Bato the revolution. The eight rays of the sun in eight provinces also felt the first revolt. In Kawit, Cavite on June 12, 1898 was a historic wave of the official flag of the First Republic. This occurred in the middle window of the home of General Aguinaldo. It became the day of full independence. But more followed this revolution against the Spaniards, Americans and other war since switching Dr. Jose Rizal and the Supremo. Many of the historical truth and reveal it tumutulay present. Mute-witness piece of cloth on real events and was even now. Thy banner will continue to shine while gentle people continued to acknowledge its importance. Production staff: Story by Deo Divinagracia and Dave Cecilio Director of Photography: Marvin Reyes Music by Miguel Cortez Wild Sound Sound by AMI Edited by Thop Nazarene, wardrobe by Ronnie Martinez Assistant Directors were Danseco Cicero, Deo Divinagracia, Edmund Mijares, Alex Brin, Ricci Rono, and Carlos Morales. Production Manager: Christopher Manabal, Assistant Production Managers: Kemuel Nini Santos Cruz Executive Producers: Carlos Morales and James Blanco DIRECTOR'S PROFILE: The Director Dave Cecilio was born in Paranas, Samar on March 6, 1972. Native of Bacoor, Cavite City, he was a child and Nora by Cecilio Cecilio Domingo. Among his professional qualifications are as follows: Filmmaker and Writer at the International Academy of Film & Television, Big Foot Entertainment, Hollywood Boulevard (Mactan Lapu-lapu City, Cebu). He was also a TV commercial director, worked at the International Institute for Film & Arts (IIFA) in Makati City. He was also a registered nurse, became a product specialist, former teacher and professioanal medical representative, gained him many kunsaan honor in this field. Among its basic video editing … [Read more...]

Ancient sea vessel: The Balangay, 1250 AD

balangay, lameco, ilustrisimo, backyard eskrima

  Thousands of years ago, the ancestors of the Filipino people, the Austronesian speaking people traveled from the Asian mainland by land bridges across the continental shelf to the South East Asian archipelago. They then sailed onward to as far East as Polynesia, and as far West as Madagascar, aboard the ancient vessel: the Balangay. The Kaya ng Pinoy Inc., launches an exciting, new undertaking that will retrace the migration of our ancestors across the oceans using only the native Balangay, built faithful to the craftsmanship and materials used during the ancient times. Navigation will also remain accurate to the method that was used by the earliest mariners - steering by the sun, the stars, the wind, cloud formations, wave patterns and bird migrations.   What is the Balangay? Early Filipinos were a people of the sea, living in coastal villages or near rivers. Boats were linked to many aspects of Filipino life: fishing, trade, warfare,  piracy (trade-raiding for goods and slaves), travel, communication, and dwelling.  The Balanghai or Balangay or Butuan Boat is a plank boat adjoined by a carved-out plank edged through pins and dowels. It was first mentioned in the 16th Century in the Chronicles of Pigafetta, and is known as the oldest Pre-Hispanic watercraft found in the Philippines. The first wooden watercraft excavated in Southeast Asia, the Balangay is only found in the Philippines where a flotilla of such prehistoric wooden boat exists throughout the world. Nine specimens were discovered in 1976 in Butuan City, Agusan Del Norte, Mindanao and 3 of which have been excavated. Examination and extensive investigation reveals that the extant boats found in the excavation site date back to 320, 990 and 1250 AD. The finely built boat, made without the use of blueprints but was taught from one generation to another, uses a technique still used by boat makers of Sibutu Island. Made 15 meters long and 3 to 4 meters wide, the Balangay is propelled by sail of buri or nipa fiber or padding and is large enough to hold 60 to 90 people. With the Balangay's size, it was used for cargo and raiding purposes, giving proof that Butuan played a central role in trade. http://www.balangay-voyage.com/index.php … [Read more...]

City of Los Angeles dedicates Historic Filipinotown By Elson Trinidad

Guro Arnold, Guro Bud and Guro Dino, along with  members of the adult and youth class of the Kali Klub, performed a demonstration of the Warrior Arts of the Philippines at LA City Hall for this unprecendented and historic event. Monday, August 5th, 2002 City of Los Angeles dedicates Historic Filipinotown By Elson Trinidad The cathedral-like chambers of the Los Angeles City Council erupted in a chorus of "Mabuhay!"s on the morning of Friday, August 2nd as the city formally recognized the heart of its Filipino-American community, known as "Historic Filipinotown." Over 100 community leaders, city workers, war veterans, students and residents of Filipino descent - many dressed in bright, traditional barongs - gathered at City Hall in Downtown Los Angeles to witness the dedication of a designated Filipino community in the ever-diverse City of Angels, bordered by Hoover Street, the 101 Freeway, Glendale Boulevard and Beverly Boulevard, located just west of Downtown. Los Angeles city councilman Eric Garcetti, whose district includes Historic Filipinotown, briefly ran down the history of Filipinos in Southern California from the 1587 landing of Manilamen in Morro Bay to earlier incarnations of Filipino districts in L.A. since the turn of the 20th century. "We celebrate today the fact that Filipinos have a historic home, a heart for their community, a place where all Filipinos are welcome, and will continue to prosper and flourish," said Garcetti. Flanked by several members of the Filipino community, Garcetti unveiled an eight-foot long blue sign that bore the name of the newly-dedicated district, which prompted fellow councilman Tom LaBonge to quip, "This is the longest sign in the history of the city of Los Angeles!" The first sign will be installed on Thursday, August 8 at the intersection of Temple Street and Union Avenue during a 9 a.m. dedication ceremony. Garcettiís predecessor Jackie Goldberg, now a California state assemblywoman, vowed that she would use her influence to have signs placed on the 101 Freeway directing motorists to Historic Filipinotown. Garcettiís staff organized the year-long project to create a Filipinotown, which involved the cooperation of non-profit agencies such as Filipino-American Service Group, Inc. (FASGI), Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA) and local residents and businesses, both Filipino and non-Filipino. According to George Villanueva, a Filipino-American who works under Garcetti as a community organizer, one of the reasons for the formation of Historic Filipinotown was to help stimulate the development and vitality of Filipino-American businesses in the area. The dedication ceremony was not only a chance for civic officials to applaud the contributions of Filipinos to Los Angeles and America as a whole, but for the leaders of the cityís Filipino community to express pride for their newly-recognized district in front of L.A.ís top politicos. "A Filipina-Australian tourist visiting town once asked me where Temple Street was," said community leader Jocelyn Geaga-Rosenthal, "She said, ëYou know, where all the Filipinos are.í" Geaga-Rosenthal, a one-time candidate for the California state assembly, also noted that the occasion would have also been a proud moment for her late mother, Remedios Geaga, who herself was a community leader in L.A.ís Filipinotown. "I hope to one day see Filipino-Americans sit within those chairs," said Joe Abella, another community leader, who also co-founded SIPA, pointing to the dignified, horseshoe-shaped table where the members of the city council are seated. One such Filipino-American elected official in Southern California, Tony Cartagena, mayor of Walnut, said, "This is a very significant occasion, itís a special day for each and every Filipino and Filipino-American...we feel like we are part of [the city] now. A brief ceremony hosted by Ed Ramolete and Jing S.J. Vida soon followed in the city hall rotunda where Garcetti and Los Angeles mayor James Hahn addressed the crowd. "Filipinos are one of the strongest ethnic communities in Southern California," said the mayor, decked in a white barong Tagalog, "this is long overdue." The mayor also commended the valor and efforts of Filipino-American World War II veterans, which filled the dimly-lit tile halls with applause and cheers. After he spoke, several attendees used Hahnís presence as an opportunity to have their photo taken with the mayor. Garcetti added that disunity in the Filipino community was the primary reason why the road to a recognized Filipinotown district was long and hard. "This is the first step in creating unity. We have not arrived, we have only begun," said the councilman. An unprecedented display of unity was demonstrated at a town fiesta-like lunch reception outside in the city hall courtyard where nearly every local Filipino restaurant collectively donated food for the event. As members of the community … [Read more...]

Book: Sinaunang Habi – Philippine Ancestral Weave by Marian Pastor-Roces

lameco ilustrisimo suite ricketts eskrima escrima kali arnis

The Nikki Coseteng Filipiniana Series "Sinaunang Habi: Philippine Ancestral Weave" by Marian Pastor-Roces Photographs by Dick Baldovino and Wig Tysman Published by Anna Dominique "Nikki" Coseteng   ABOUT THE BOOK "Sinaunang Habi's first edition was published in 1991, and reprinted in 2000. It has become a sought-after book in the international circuit of textile connoisseurs of indigenous traditions. This unique book gives us not only a rich collection of haberdashery imbued with artistry and beauty, but also a rich insight into the different ethnic groups in the Philippines. The extensive and informative essays provide a historical and anthropological background on the indigenous people inhabiting each region. The clothing silently but expressively speaks of a nation's unique cultures, customs, ceremonial life, rituals, and practical needs, lending beauty to handcrafted objects while continuing age-old traditions."                               … [Read more...]

Brisbane Stickfighting – Queensland, Australia

sticks

  Brisbane Stick fighting is a regular gathering of martial art practitioners interested in developing their stick fighting ability within a safe informal atmosphere. The current group is made up of a guys from different backgrounds each bringing their own different abilities and experiences into the sparing, with a variety of ages, nationalities and styles, the differences in fighting styles has proven to bring more out of us. We have previously discovered sparring with the same opponent over time can become predictable as each players learns instinctively the other players patterns of motions or tells. By bringing in new sparring partners we seek to avoid falling into the same old patterns, so that we can learn to flow or break the flow of our opponent, overcoming them no matter their size, strength or fighting ability. Visit the website @: http://www.brisbanestickfighting.com/index.html … [Read more...]

Tinalakay sa kumperensya ni Dr. Isorena ang ‘Bangka at Kolonisasyon’. Ito ay hango sa kanyang disertasyon.

guro dino flores lameco ilustrsimo backyard eskrima mandirigma.org

  … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores Seminar: Madrid, Spain. A finales de Junio 2011 Workshop con armas blancas con Guro Dino Flores – conocido como uno de los peleadores más técnicos y avanzados del grupo SOG de LAMECO y KALIS ILUSTRISIMO

A finales de Junio 2011 Workshop con armas blancas con Guro Dino Flores - conocido como uno de los peleadores más técnicos y avanzados del grupo SOG de LAMECO y KALIS ILUSTRISIMO (Sulite Original Backyard Group) http://www.kali-jeetkunedo.com/6noticias.html Interested contact with Sifu Tim Fredianelli 615308348 Space must be reserved in advance for these courses, places are limited to ensure quality. Special rates and privileges for members only at our school … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores in Frankfurt, Germany. Kali Ilustrisimo & Lameco – Seminar mit Guro Dino Flores/USA

Friday, July 1, 2011 at 7:00pm - July 2 at 6:00pm Lameco Arnis Club  Königsberger Strasse 6, 1ter Stock Frankfurt am Main, Germany Mit Lameco Guro Dino Flores wird uns ein weiterer Lameco Sulite Orehenal Group Member in Frankfurt besuchen!!  Zum ersten Mal in Deutschland wird Kali Ilustrisimo von einem langjährigen Schüler von Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite und Master Christopher Ricketts vorgestellt. Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite und Master Christopher Ricketts sind 2 der 5 Pfeiler des Kali Ilustrisimo (5 Pillars : Grandmaster Tony Diego, Master Yuli Romo, Master Christopher Ricketts, Master Rey Galang and the late Punong Guro Edgar Sulite) Eine Gelegenheit dieses einmalige klingenbasierte System in Deutschland zu lernen, die man sich nicht entgehen lassen sollte!!! Lameco - WORKSHOP DATUM: Freitag 01.07.2011 ZEIT: 19:00 bis 22:00 ORT: Lameco Arnis Club Frankfurt, Königsberger Strasse 6, 1ter Stock, 60487 Frankfurt/Main PREIS: 35€ Kali-Ilustrisimo -SEMINAR DATUM: 02.07.2011 ORT: Lameco Arnis Club Frankfurt, Königsberger Strasse 6, 1ter Stock, 60487 Frankfurt/Main ZEIT: 10:00 bis 13:00 & 14:00 bis 18:00 PREIS 65€ http://www.lameco-arnis.de/ … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores Ilustrisimo, Lameco Seminars May 14th and 15th Brisbane Australia Southside Arnis Escrima Club

Guro Dino Flores Ilustrisimo, Lameco Seminars May 14th and 15th Brisbane Australia Southside Arnis Escrima Club is honored to be hosting Guro Dino Flores Seminars in Brisbane, Australia. The seminar will be on the highly respected Filipino Martial Systems of Kalis Ilustrisimo and Lameco. Details as follows: 1st available session Friday the 14th of May at 6pm in the Martial Arts Hall of the Sports Centre at University of Queensland St.Lucia Brisbane. The building closes up at 9pm so plan to arrive at around 5:30pm so we get a full 3 hour session in. Saturday 15th May in the same building but a different room (Multi Purpose Room) starting at 10:30am going for 3 hours. The prebooked price will be $65 per person per day. At the door price it will be $70 per person per day. Please contact me via email on alan.mcfarlane.beae@hotmail.com or Mobile (In Australia) 0466 442 913 if you wish to attend or if you have any enquiries. Again please contact me via email on alan.mcfarlane.beae@hotmail.com or Mobile (In Australia) 0466 442 913 if you wish to attend or if you have any enquiries. Last edited by Alan McFarlane; 04-22-2010 at 12:07 AM. … [Read more...]

The Philippines – Early Collection. The Museum of Ethnology, Vienna – Austria

guro dino flores lameco ilustrisimo backyard eskrima

[Read more...]

The 1st and 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments of World War Two

guro dino flores kali arnis eskrima mandirigma.org

  This article was brought to our attention by Guro Hospecio "Bud" Balani, Jr. As it turns out both his father, Hospecio Balbuena Balani, Sr., and his uncle, Martin D. Balbuena, were both members of the Regiment. He also had numerous uncles in the Regiment but to get their names, he'd have to dig deep into the darkest recesses of his mind, and it might get ugly in there. From what he understands, "The United States wanted to be at Regiment strength so they eventually merged the three Battalions into one unit and formed the 1st Filipino Regiment (keeping the First Unit's Patch). Regiments are two or more Battalions, Battalions are three or more Companies. Companies are three or more Platoons. Platoons are three or more Squads. Squads are nine strong. These are just rough estimates. Also, any unit with the spelling of "Philippines" were US Army units that were recruited in the homeland. There were many Philippine Scout units, all in the Philippine islands. Any unit with the spelling of "Filipino", was a unit formed in the United States, with the only units being Laging Una, Sulong and Bahala Na." Saturday, August 14th, 2004 The 1st and 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments By David T. Vivit, 1LT, AUS (Ret) Laging Una - Sulung The 1st & 2nd (Laging Una - Sulung) Filipino Infantry Regiments were units of the Army of the United States (AUS) inducted into service during World War II. They were wholly manned by Filipino citizens in this country and Hawaii and officered by both Filipinos and Americans, the only non citizen units in the American Citizen Army. They were similar to the Philippine Scouts in that the latter were also wholly manned by Filipino citizens with both Filipino and American officers, but the similarities ended there. The Scouts were professional soldiers in the Philippine Department of the United States Regular Army (USA). Most of the men were married and enjoyed a high economic and social status in the Philippines in contrast to the mostly single discriminated against (in the U.S.) "laborers" and students of the Filipino Regiments. Each group of Filipino soldiers played important but different roles in World War II. After the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor and Clark Field, Filipinos in the U.S. and Hawaii rushed to Army Recruiting Stations to enlist only to be rejected because they were not (US) citizens (Filipinos were not eligible for U.S. citizenship before the war). As residents, however, they were registered under the Draft Law, and when the first Filipino Battalion was activated in San Luis Obispo, California in April 1942, they "volunteered" for the draft instead of waiting for their call. This unique unit was to spearhead MacArthur's liberation forces when he returned to the Philippines. But the military authorities made a great miscalculation! In three months the 1st Filipino Battalion became the 1st Filipino Regiment, activated in Salinas on July 13, 1942 and on October 14th of the same year the 2nd Regiment was activated at Ft. Ord, bringing together a fighting force of more than 7,000 men. If created earlier, the Battalion very well could have become a Division. By the time it was activated hundreds had already joined the Navy and Army Air Corps. With an average age of over 30, they more than made up this overage by their spirit and enthusiasm. In no other units of the AUS in WWII, including the much publicized 442nd Regimental Combat Team (NISEI), was the motivation greater and the morale higher than in the 1st & 2nd Filipino Regiments. About the end of 1942 and in early 1943, these Filipino soldiers became American citizens under a new U.S Naturalization Law in mass oath taking ceremonies which made headlines throughout the country. After two years of intensive training in California without a single Court Martial case, these units went to New Guinea to prepare for their landings in the Philippines. Here the 2nd Regiment was split up into the Counter-Intelligence Units (CIC), the Alamo Scouts and the Philippine Civil Affairs Unit (PCAU) all of which played important roles during the liberation. The 1st Regiment remained intact as a combat team but for some unknown reason was not with the initial landing forces in Leyte. Instead it was relegated to the minor (but more dangerous against a fanatical enemy) role of mopping-up operations in Samar and Leyte. In accomplishing this difficult mission with minimum casualties, it earned the reputation of being the "most decorated regiment in the Pacific". It remained for a "child" of the regiments, 1st Reconnaissance Battalion (Bahala Na) known only as "commandos" in the Philippines, whose operations during the occupation had been kept secret until recently, to really "spearhead MacArthur's return to the Islands." But this is a story in itself. More significant than their military feats was their accomplishments in the field of romance. These gallant soldiers literally chased the shy, coy and above … [Read more...]

Film: Amigo (2010)

dino flores ilustrisimo

Movie: Amigo (2010) Amigo is a 2010 American drama film written and directed by John Sayles. The film takes place in the Philippines in 1900 during the Philippine–American War. It is one of only a small handful of films directed by an American to address the war. Plot Amigo centers on Rafael Dacanay, cabeza of the barrio of San Isidro in a rice-growing area of Luzon. His brother Simón, head of the local guerilla band, has forced the surrender of the Spanish guardia civil outpost and charged Rafael with the task of imprisoning the guardia Captain and the barrio’s Spanish friar, Padre Hidalgo, in the name of the revolutionary government. But when the American troops chasing General Aguinaldo arrive, the Spanish officer and Padre Hidalgo are freed, and a garrison under the command of Lieutenant Ike Compton is left to ‘protect’ the barrio. The American occupation policy now changes from ‘hearts and minds’ to ‘concentration’ (what was called ‘hamletting’ during the Vietnam war) and Rafael has to answer to both the Americans and the Filipino patriots, with deadly consequences. Cast •    Chris Cooper as Col. Hardacre •    Garret Dillahunt as Lt. Compton •    DJ Qualls as Zeke •    Yul Vàzquez as Padre Hidalgo •    Joel Torre as Rafael •    Lucas Neff as Shanker •    James Parks as Sgt. Runnels •    Dane DeHaan as Gill •    Stephen Taylor as Pvt. Bates •    Rio Locsin as Corazon •    Jemi Paretas as Zuniga •    Bill Tangradi as Dutch •    Bembol Roco as Policarpio •    Ronnie Lazaro as Simon •    Irma Adlawan as Josefa Press Cinematical reports that the film was once titled Baryo, and that the idea for it came from a yet-to-be-published novel Some Time in the Sun, detailing U.S. imperialism in the Philippines. The book will actually be called A Moment in the Sun, though the unrealized screenplay which inspired it was called Some Time in the Sun. Distribution Amigo will show on September 14 at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival. It will also screen at the San Sebastián International Film Festival and the Rio de Janeiro International Film Festival. In North America, the film will be released on August 20, 2011 by Variance Films. From Wikipedia … [Read more...]

The Two Conquests By Angel Postigo

mandirigma.org escrima

Guro Dino of the Mandirigma Research Organization met Professor Angel Postigo and his father on one of his many business trips to Los Angeles from Mexico. Professor Postigo is a person with a very impressive resume in the warrior arts and journalism, among other things, having written for Artes Marciales, Katana, Kung Fu Magazine, Legitima Defensa and National Sports Directory of Mexico. They found that they both have a passion for history and its relationship to the warrior arts. Some of the discussions they had concerned the connections between the Philippines and Mexico for hundreds of years. Professor Postigo felt that mandirigma.org would be an excellent venue to present his articles of this often overlooked relationship between the Philippines and Mexico in history. Quoting Professor Postigo, "The reason why I am interested in working with "mandirigma.org" is to showcase my work as a writer interested in disseminating and spreading the culture of the Martial Arts of the Philippines, work that I have done in several Mexican magazines." Friday, October 12th, 2007 The Two Conquests By Angel Postigo Suddenly, the ascent they had begun at the beach, finally ended. Thousands of miles behind, their guides had led them to cross between those two volcanoes, the Popocatepetl and the Iztacihuatl. Standing in the snow, those iron men and their heraldic horses had that spectacle at their feet: beyond this wooded spot of splendid beauty, far beyond, into those mountains, a wide green valley was extended, and in the center the lakes shined like silver, and above the islands and the banks, those citadels with plazas and wide roads, the high roofs of its temples upon splendid hand-painted pyramids, and the woods and great fields full of exotic plants that enlightened those magic days of autumn. For the first time, western men looked at that wonderful landscape, as if painted on the evening air, and their eyes glowed as they contemplated the plain and remembered the gold and sacred feathered presents they had been offered as a plead to retire, to stay away. Cortes and his soldiers had started the advance to that plain, to Tenochtitlan, and the battles were about to begin. The great lord of the empire, Moctezuma II, intelligent and educated man, though deeply superstitious as most of his people, knew that his kingdom had come to its end. The news had spread as a desperate scream: Quetzalcoatl has returned, the Serpent God that promised to return in the year one, Acatl (1519), the prophecies are fulfilled now, the white-skinned bearded God has returned. Moctezuma knows a battle against a God is impossible, he has to have the help of other gods in order to save his nation. Being Cortes an extremely skillful politician and warrior, he perceives the rivalries between the different towns, and above all, the exacerbated hate against the Mexicas and their Aztec empire. Cortes returned to Tenochtitlan, not before suffering a defeat known as the Sad Night, when fallen and surrounded he was spared as many soldiers thanks to the tradition of not killing the enemy, just defeating them to take some prisoners for the ritual sacrifices. According to the number of prisoners, those warriors, Eagle men and Jaguar men, ascended in their military ranges. They were true conquerors who went further their frontiers of Guatemala, but their conquest had seeded rancor against the Aztec empire. Their armies were the best armed and trained. They had a regular troop, Yaoquizquel, and a lower but considerable number of noble warriors, Pipiltin, who belonged to a society known as the Eagle men, Quauhtin, and Jaguar men, Ocelomeh. Their elegant clothing had the skins of those felines and the feathers of those sacred birds. They were the sons of nobles who went to the Calmecac to receive military and cultural education, they learned astronomy, rhetoric, poetry, but above all, religion, and their status was well established, and how they could ascent according to their bravery, but above all, to the number of prisoners caught in battle. The Tlamani were the ones in charged of guarding the prisoners. This noble warriors, elegantly dressed, had as their main weapons the Macuahuitl, a kind of long club with sharp obsidian points, a round shield made of leather named Chimalli, an arc known as Tlauitolli, and a throwing spear, Atlatl. As he walks through many different spots of this empire, Cortes realizes the situation. In some places he has battles, but in others he comes to agreements easily, accomplishing an alliance in the first year of his arrival, and after establishing the Villa Rica de la Vera Cruz. One of the alliances was with the Zapoteca people, and afterwards, with others oppressed by the Aztec empire, the Texcocanos, the Huejotzincas and the Totonacas. Cortes starts his first march towards Mexico, Tenochtitlan, on August 16th, 1519, towards the heart of the empire. He has only 400 Spanish soldiers, 15 horses, 3 canons, … [Read more...]

Protected: Sponsor Member Area

Katipunero

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Film: The Pacific Connection – Philippines, 1974

mandirigma.org

Roland Dantes plays an avenging hero, who defeats the forces of oppression with the power of Arnis! Roland Dantes plays Ben, a farm boy who comes into conflict with the Evil Spanish Governor and his two sons. One of the sons is played by a young Dean Stockwell. To assist in their oppression the Governor hires a Samurai played by Hiroshi Tanaka to teach his son the Japanese Katana sword. To counter this, Ben studies under a blind Franciscan monk to obtain some advanced fighting secrets and develop his warrior senses. Additionally Ben must search for the legendary "Iron Reed". A mystical stick so strong that grows in the lava of an active Volcano. One of the first full length movies featuring the Philippine Warrior Arts. A must see for any Filipino Martial Arts practitioner. Made in a similar spirit of the "Kung Fu" movies coming out of Hong Kong at the same time in the 1970's. The fight scenes were choreographed by Professor Remy Presas himself and is jam packed with Arnis inspired fight scenes. Dean Stockwell learned Arnis for his role and continued his Arnis practice long after the filming was over. The success of this movie led to a follow up film "Arnis: Sticks of Death" in 1984 also starring Roland Dantes. Director: Luis Nepomuceno Country: Philippines Language: English Release Date: 1974 (Philippines) Stars: Roland Dantes, Dean Stockwell, Hiroshi Tanaka, Nancy Kwan, Guy Madison, Alejandro Rey, Gilbert Roland, Elizabeth Oropesa, Fred Galang, Gloria Sevilla, Vic Diaz, Cole Mallard … [Read more...]