Guro Bud Balani of Kapisanang Mandirigma Remembers Master Wilson Vinas of Lapu Lapu Viñas Arnis

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Guro Bud Balani Remembers Master Wilson Vinas of Lapu Lapu Viñas Arnis   Master Wilson Vinas May 29, 1945 to Nov 10, 2017       In Remembrance of Grandmaster Wilson 'Nonong' Viñas of Viñas Lapu Lapu Arnis Affecionados, whom I first met in Bacolod city, Philippines @ Y2K REST IN PEACE   Signage above the entrance of the Original Viñas Lapu Lapu Arnis Gym on Lacson street @ Bacolod City. GM Jose Viñas founded his organization in 1932, which made it the oldest arnis organization in Negros Occidental, Philippines   My visit with Master Nonong @ his Residence / Gym Bacolod city 2000 Meeting for first time in 15 years LAX 2015   Welcoming Master Nonong on his arrival to the US with Master Joe Tan, who is an original student of Master Nonong's father, Grandmaster Jose Viñas, who founded the Viñas Lapu Lapu Arnis Affecionados in Bacolod city in 1932, which was the oldest Arnis organization in Negros Occidental, Philippines LAX 2015   Master Viñas was kind enough to share some of his vast knowledge to a group at the Aranda-Ricketts Memorial FMA Gym in Glendale during his visit to California in 2015. Master Vinas first ever Public Seminar. Mandirigma.org/Kapisanang Mandirigma was honored to sponsor this historic event. ( http://mandirigma.org/?p=2808 ) GM Nonato 'Nene' Gaabucayan of NNG Balintawak came to welcome Nonong on his visit, as well as Guro Dino Florence, of Lameco SOG / Kali Ilustrisimo, who was also one of the sponsors of this rare event. Master Joe Tan, had driver duty, as he was an original student of Master Nonong's father, the late great, GM Jose Viñas, founder of Viñas Lapu Lapu Arnis Affecionados of Bacolod city, Philippines … [Read more...]

Guro Dino Flores in Budo Magazine, Japanese, Chinese and French Language Edition. November 2017.

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Guro Dino Flores in Budo Magazine, Japanese and Chinese Language Edition. November 2017.   https://youtu.be/R0Gvw6NZjH4   https://issuu.com/budoweb/docs/martial_20arts_20magazine_20budo_20_bd9e9e848cf9e4/72   https://budointernational.com/en/buscar?controller=search&orderby=position&orderway=desc&search_query=guro+dino&submit_search=       … [Read more...]

Manois Eskrima 40th Anniversary Workshop. Las Vegas, Nevada. November 2017.

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    Manois Eskrima 40th Anniversary Workshop. Las Vegas, Nevada. November 2017.   … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Lameco and Ilustrisimo Eskrima Seminar. August 13th, 2017. Moses Lake, Washington.

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Philippine-American War, 1899-1902 by Arnaldo Dumindin

Execution on the Luneta of Filipino rebels ca 1896-97

  Philippine-American War, 1899-1902 by Arnaldo Dumindin http://www.filipinoamericanwar.com/   Background: The Philippine Revolution and the Spanish-American War The Philippines (LEFT, 1898 map) was a colony of Spain from 1571 to 1898. Spanish rule came to an end as a result of the Philippine Revolution and US involvement with Spain's other major colony, Cuba. The Philippine archipelago, with  a total land area of 300,000 sq km (115,831 sq mi), comprises 7,107 islands in the western Pacific Ocean, located close to the present-day countries of Indonesia, Malaysia, Palau and the island of Taiwan. The capital, Manila, is 6,977 miles (11,228 km) distant --- "as the crow flies" --- across the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco, California, U.S.A. The two cities are separated by 6,061 nautical miles of water. Luzon and Mindanao are the two largest islands, anchoring the archipelago in the north and south. Luzon has an area of 104,700 sq km (40,400 sq mi) and Mindanao has an area of 94,630 sq km (36,540 sq mi). Together, they account for 66% of the country's total landmass. Only nine other islands have an area of more than 2,600 sq km (1,000 sq mi) each: Samar, Negros, Palawan, Panay, Mindoro, Leyte, Cebu, Bohol and Masbate. More than 170 dialects are spoken in the archipelago, almost all of them belonging to the Borneo-Philippines group of the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family. Twelve major dialects  – Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, Pangasinense; Southern Bicol, Kiniray-a, Maranao, Maguindanao and Tausug (the last three in Muslim areas of Southern Philippines) – make up about 90% of the population. The population in 1898 was about 9 million. More at: http://www.filipinoamericanwar.com/ … [Read more...]

SEMINARIO DE LAMECO ESKRIMA Y KALI ILUSTRISIMO CON GURO DINO FLORES EN TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, CHIAPAS. September, 2017.

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SEMINARIO DE LAMECO ESKRIMA Y KALI ILUSTRISIMO CON GURO DINO FLORES EN TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, CHIAPAS. September, 2017.   … [Read more...]

Seminar: Lameco SOG Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses and Guro Dino Flores. Las Vegas, Nevada. June 24th, 2017.

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Seminar: Lameco SOG Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses and Guro Dino Flores. Las Vegas, Nevada. June 24th, 2017.     … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel F. Mosses Seminar hosted by South Jersey Tactical Fighting Arts. June 10th – 11th, 2017.

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Guro Ariel F. Mosses Seminar hosted by South Jersey Tactical Fighting Arts South Jersey Tactical Fighting Arts Presents:  COMING JUNE 10TH AND 11TH To Folsom N.J. Https://www.paypal.me/sjtactical Traditional Arts for a Modern World!Master Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under the watchful eyes and close supervision of three legendary Grandmasters: Filipino Martial Arts Hall of Fame Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois, the late Grandmaster Christopher "Topher" Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo, and the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, founder of Lameco Eskrima International.Master Ariel F. Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. Master Mosses holds an 8th degree black belt in Kali Jukune Do, as well as an 8th level Master Instructor in Manaois Eskrima.He is an authorized Senior Instructor in Lameco S.O.G., and an authorized Senior Instructor in Kali Ilustrisimo C.N.R. Master Mosses is enshrined in the Filipino Martial Arts Hall of Fame, and is a proud member of Kapisanang Mandirigma, a Federation of warriors from different disciplines of the Warrior Arts of the Philippines.Master Mosses is a certified Nevada CCW instructor.Trained by LEGENDS of Filipino CombatThe Filipino Warrior Tradition is founded upon honoring and preserving the knowledge passed on though our teachers. Each generation of students should seek to maintain the virtues and the original intent of his teachers' systems of combat. These are the teachers and friends who have directly trained Master Mosses.Grand Master Conrad A. ManaoisGrand Master Christopher "Topher" RickettsPunong Guro Edgar G. Sulite Close Ties: Family, Honor, TraditionMaster Mosses has close ties with the influential trainers and practitioners in FMA today. This close knit group forms a small community, frequently training together to keep the tradition ALIVE, VIBRANT, and TRUE to its roots. Master Mosses's cousin and friend, Guro Dino Flores, shares in this long history of training and sparring together.They began their formal training in the 1980's with Grandmaster Henry Bio, of Sikaran Arnis. Both Master Mosses and Guro Flores also trained in the NINOY CINCO TEROS Arnis style with Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois.Each also trained directly with Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite. Guro Dino was accepted as an initial member of Sulite's newly formed BACKYARD GROUP, AKA The Sulite Oriehenal Group (S.O.G.) into which Master Mosses became an honorary member.Master Mosses soon relocated to Washington State, where Punong Guro Sulite made Master Mosses his head representative for the state. Over the years, Punong Guro spent many weeks at Master Mosses's home where he PERSONALLY trained Master Mosses. He became Master Mosses's close friend and mentor. Today, Master Mosses continues to teach his beloved instructor's Lameco Eskrima in its pure form.Guro Flores and Master Mosses also trained for many years under Grand Master Christopher N. "Topher" Ricketts until his passing in 2010. … [Read more...]

Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, April 29th, 2017

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Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, April 29th, 2017   … [Read more...]

Lameco Eskrima Practitioners Honor Punong Guro Edgar Sulite on his 20th Death Anniversary with training sessions and gatherings around the globe.

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Lameco Eskrima Practitioners Honor Punong Guro Edgar Sulite  on his 20th Death Anniversary with training sessions and gatherings around the globe.       Punong Guro Edgar Sulite September 25, 1957 – April 10, 1997   ------------   MADRID, SPAIN     Madrid, Spain Group headed by Guro Tim Fredianelli: Honoring the memory of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite by training in Lameco Arnis in Madrid Spain. Our mode to all Lameco practitioners everywhere! Punong Guro Sulites 20th death anniversary. In Honor of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite we made a special training today. Our respects to our brothers from Lameco everywhere.     --------   MEXICO CITY, MEXICO     -------------   ZACATEPEC DE HIDALGO, MEXICO       ------   PINTO, SPAIN   Pinto Spain Group headed by Alfonso Lopez: On April 2 we did a training, in memory, and tribute to Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, in which we read the biography of Punong Guro, and performed a training with a great feeling, of course we had a memory of our brother recently deceased Alex Garduño, Our respects to all Lameco practitioners everywhere, Punong Guro Edgar Sulite 20th Death anniversary, and a special thanks to our Guros to keep alive the memory of Punong Guro. ----- LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, USA         ----- FOLSOM, NEW JERSEY, USA   South Jersey Group headed by Jamie Morris … [Read more...]

How Filipino WWII Soldiers Were Written Out of History by Rosie Cima

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How Filipino WWII Soldiers Were Written Out of History This post was written by Rosie Cima. You can follow her on Twitter here. Original Link: https://priceonomics.com/how-filipino-soldiers-were-written-out-of-the/ American and Filipino officers in the USAFFE in World War II (U.S. Army) From 1941-1944, hundreds of thousands of Filipino soldiers fought and died under the command of American generals against the Japanese in the Philippines. This struggle included one of the worst military defeats in U.S. history, and a grisly period of imprisonment and occupation. In exchange for their service in the United States Armed Forces of the Far East (USAFFE), Filipino soldiers were promised American citizenship and full veterans benefits. But Congress and President Truman reneged this offer in 1946. Only four thousand Filipino war veterans, out of an estimated 200,000 who survived the war, were able to get citizenship before the retraction was signed into law. You didn’t sleep through this section of US History. It was never taught. The role of Filipino soldiers in WWII has largely been erased from the history books. Building a Philippine Army In 1941, the United States suspected war with Japan was imminent. Whether they ‘knew’ Japan would strike Pearl Harbor is a matter of debate, but Japan had expanded its assaults to American allies. The Imperial Japanese objective was domination of all of Asia, and, having conquered Korea, parts of Russia, China and Taiwan, many of the countries that remained were colonial holdings of Western nations. According to an article in Salon: “[Roosevelt’s] administration had adopted the objective of defeating all the Axis powers and had begun the military and the economic planning to achieve it. He had shared that objective publicly with the American people, a large majority of whom now accepted war as inevitable.” The Philippines was a large American holding in the South Pacific. And what’s more, it was vulnerable. The Philippine army circa 1936 (Wikipedia) At the start of 1941, the Philippines had a meager army. It was a commonwealth of the United States from 1935 to 1946, and the US government was stewarding the archipelago's transition from a territory of the United States into an independent nation. Part of that transition should have involved amassing a Filipino military -- to replace the U.S. forces that had guarded the Philippines when it was a territory. But development of such a force was slow. Had the Japanese attacked the Philippines in January 1941, eleven months before Pearl Harbor, they would have encountered a few thousand American troops and a few thousand Filipinos. Which is why, in the summer of 1941, following the 1940 Japanese capture of French Indochina, the U.S. started recruiting a Philippine defense force like crazy. For the first few decades of the 20th century, because the U.S. “owned” the Philippines, Filipinos were considered U.S. “nationals.” U.S. nationals can work and reside in the U.S. without restriction, carry a U.S. passport, and apply for citizenship under the same rules as other resident foreigners. As a result, in 1940, there were about 45,000 Filipinos in the United States, most of them service-aged, male farm and factory laborers. Military service was then, as it is now, one of the shorter and more reliable paths for an alien to achieve citizenship. From 1941 to the end of the war, the government streamlined the hell out of that path. Filipino men were recruited into the U.S. military and given citizenship in mass naturalization ceremonies. Nearly one third of draft-age Filipinos in the continental U.S. volunteered for the Army. “When I reported to Los Angeles,” one Filipino-American WWII veteran is quoted in the book Filipino American Lives, “they swore me in as a U.S. citizen. I did not even have to file an application.” But the U.S. also recruited different branches of Philippine defenders from within the Philippines. Many of these individuals, and the Filipino immigrants who enlisted in the continental U.S., were motivated by a desire to protect the Philippines, their home, from an attack by the Imperial Japanese. Filipino soldiers in basic training (US Army) But the United States government sweetened the deal: President Roosevelt promised U.S. citizenship and full veterans benefits to Filipinos who took up arms against the Japanese. By late November, the United States Armed Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) was formed as the merger of the Philippine Commonwealth army and the US Armed Forces stationed in the Philippines. General Douglas MacArthur was made commander of the USAFFE. Ultimately, the allied forces in the Philippine campaign from 1941-1942 consisted of 120,000 Filipino troops and 30,000 American troops, some of whom were Filipino Americans. 8 Hours After Pearl Harbor The USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor … [Read more...]

Rest In Peace Guro Alejandro Garduno Hernandez of Lameco Eskrima Mexico/Combat Academy. 1970 to 2017.

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  An announcement from Guro Dave Gould: I wanted to announce to everyone on the Group some sad news; One of my most trusted and loyal Lameco Eskrima students from Mexico has just passed. Most of you know him and have befriended him on Face Book, Alejandro "Alex" Garduno from Morelos. On September 12, 2016 after test results came back, Alex was diagnosed with a blood disease called: "Hemoconcentration" which is associated with a life time of untreated High Blood Pressure, which resulted in an enlarged heart, the same thing that happened to PG Sulite which lead to his suffering a stroke 20 years ago from two day ago. Alex died from the stroke that he was felled by. Alex first began training with me back in 2000 when I was flown into teach a Lameco Eskrima seminar in Mexico City. He went on to become my student and trained with me as he would bring me to Mexico for Seminars over the years. He ranked under me as an Apprentice Instructor in the Lameco Eskrima system. He also later brought in brother Roger Agbulos and Dino Flores to do Seminars there in Mexico, as well he hosted the Sulite Orehenal Group in Mexico City in 2014 where Bong Hebia, Bud Balani Jr., Dino Flores, and I conducted a Lameco Eskrima Camp there for three days. He will be missed... Rest in peace brother :( ------ From Guro Dino Flores: Rest well Alex... Rest In Peace my good friend. One of the kindest gentlemen I have ever met. Not only was Alex one of the primary heads of Lameco Eskrima in Mexico, he was also our representative for Kali Ilustrisimo in Mexico. Love and prayers to Leti and all the immediate and huge extended family. You will be dearly missed. ----   … [Read more...]

Punong Guro Edgar Sulite interview by Guro Steve Tarani. February 1997.

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Following is a very interesting Interview from 20 years ago of Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, conducted by our Lameco Eskrima "backyard" brother, Steve Tarani in February of 1997. This was probably the last interview that PG Sulite would give before he passed away soon after on April 10, 1997. This interview was published in Guro Dan Inosanto`s; Inosanto Academy of Martial Art`s (IAMA) "Free Voice" Magazine which was made available quarterly to those of us who trained at the Inosanto Academy. This Interview was in the Spring Issue of 1997 just after PG Sulite pased away. In the Interview PG Sulite speaks about his years of practicing the Chinese Internal Arts of Tai-Chi and Hsing-I, both of which he had trained for quite a while back in the Philippines while he was younger. There he would get up early every morning and train his Kali, Arnis and Eskrima for hours, which was always a very intensive hard energy driven labor. He would then follow that up and finish with a Tai-Chi or Hsing-I session and then meditate to balance the "warrior inside" as he would call it, that being his spiritual being which had to be in harmonious balance with his physical being to complete both opposing sides of "yin and yang" representing both hard and soft when combining Lameco Eskrima with Tai-Chi and Hsing-I. PG Sulite used to demonstrate to us often his push hands of Hsing-I. I remember him literally lifting our Lameco Eskrima "backyard" brother, Hans Anton Tan off of his feet and throwing him into the side of a wall to demonstrate the power of his Chi. He practiced a lot of this with our "backyard" brother Bong Hebia as well. PG Sulite would often tell us that we had to master both external and internal in order to have the best and most effective versions of our combative selves to come forward. In addition to training Tai-Chi and Hsing-I, PG also trained Ng Cho Kung Fu from his friend and publisher, Master Alexander L. Co in addition to that PG Sulite would further condition his palms, hands and forearms with a type of Iron Palm training. All of this in addition to his Indigenous Pilipino Warrior Arts of Kali, Arnis and Eskrima. Click on each of the two images below to read the full context of the interview below.       … [Read more...]

Written by Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite; From the “Vortex” Lameco Eskrima International Newsletter, Volume 4, Number 1 circa 1995.

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Written by Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite; From the "Vortex" Lameco Eskrima International Newsletter, Volume 4, Number 1 circa 1995. … [Read more...]

Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite on the need of having “LAMECO” Goals in training, in life and beyond… circa May 1993.

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Below is what Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite had to say about the need of having "LAMECO" Goals in training, in life and beyond... circa May 1993. This was published in our quarterly Lameco Eskrima "Vortex" Newsletter, Volume 2, Number 3 circa 1993.   … [Read more...]

The Year of Remembrance, Legacy and Honor, regarding the milestone Anniversaries of the following: Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite whose 20th Anniversary of Death will be on April 10, 2017. GM Jose D. Caballero whose 30th Anniversary of Death will be on August 24, 2017. GM Antonio “Tatang” Ilustrisimo whose 20th Anniversary of Death will be on August 30, 2017.

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    Guro Dave Gould made this poster to declare 2017: The Year of Remembrance, Legacy and Honor, regarding the milestone Anniversaries of the following: Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite whose 20th Anniversary of Death will be on April 10, 2017. GM Jose D. Caballero whose 30th Anniversary of Death will be on August 24, 2017. GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo whose 20th Anniversary of Death will be on August 30, 2017. For all Lameco Eskrima practitioners the lives and contributions of all three of these men should be celebrated as they were all so responsible for the Lameco Eskrima system as we know and practice it today. We know that there will be events planned to pay respect for PG Sulite on his upcoming 20th Anniversary of death and throughout the year and I really hope that we will all do the same in honor of both GM Jose D. Caballero and GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo in like manner, as the knowledge of both run deep in the Lameco Eskrima system in making it as effective as it is. Naturally we will always honor the memory of Master "Topher" Ricketts for his influence on the Lameco Eskrima system as well as all of our fraternal Lameco Eskrima family who have passed both some time ago and recently. Lets make this a memorable year for all of these great men and remind people who we are and from whence we come. … [Read more...]

Guro Dan Inosanto interview about his Lameco Eskrima Instructor, PG Edgar G. Sulite. April 1997.

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Guro Dan Inosanto interview about his Lameco Eskrima Instructor, PG Edgar G. Sulite. April 1997. Below is an interview circa April 1997 that Guro Dan Inosanto gave about his Lameco Eskrima Instructor, PG Edgar G. Sulite. Guro Dan Inosanto trained privately in Lameco Eskrima under PG Sulite from 1989 - 1997 for a total of 8 years and was very impressed with his combative prowess as well as his teaching ability. In that time Guro Dan Inosanto rose to the rank of Senior Instructor in the Lameco Eskrima system under PG Sulite and has been the Vice President (Vice Chairman) of the Lameco Eskrima International Association since about 1990 and still remains in that position today. The interview below was published in Guro Dan Inosanto`s; Inosanto Academy of Martial Art`s (IAMA) "Free Voice" Magazine which was made available quarterly to those of us who trained at the Inosanto Academy. This Interview was in the Spring Issue of 1997 just after PG Sulite passed away. … [Read more...]

On Bataan, a 26th Cavalry Troop, consisting mostly of Filipino Troopers and led by Lt. Edwin Ramsey performed the last U.S. Cavalry horse mounted charge to engage an enemy in warfare.

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U.S. Philippine Cavalry Scouts at the 2017 Pasadena Rose Parade. California, USA. On Bataan, a 26th Cavalry Troop, consisting mostly of Filipino Troopers and led by Lt. Edwin Ramsey performed the last U.S. Cavalry horse mounted charge to engage an enemy in warfare. This charge occurred at the town of Morong, Bataan on January 16, 1942.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVCZrg-xQxo&feature=share 26th Cavalry Regiment (PS) Link to original site: http://www.philippine-scouts.org/the-scouts/regiments-units-bases/26th-cavalry-regiment-ps.html Original coat-of-arms for the 26th Cavalry (PS), courtesy of First Sergeant Charles Aresta (USA Ret.). The red and white mantling signifies that the unit was originally formed from Field Artillery personnel.   History   The 26th Cavalry was formed in 1922, at Fort Stotsenburg, Pampanga Philippines from elements of the 25th Field Artillery Regiment and the 43d Infantry Regiment (PS). The regiment was based there, with the exception of Troop F (which was based at Nichols Field). In addition to horse mounted troops, the regiment had an HQ Troop, a Machine Gun Troop, a platoon of six Indiana White M1 Scout Cars and trucks for transporting service elements. Scout Cars of the 26th Cavalry (PS), 1937.   On November 30th 1941, the Regiment had 787 Filipino Enlisted Men and 55 American Officers. For the rosters of the 26th Cavalry Regt., please click here. Captain John Wheeler leading the Machine Gun Troop of the 26th Cavalry Regiment (PS) prior to the Japanese invasion. From the cover of the March/April 1943 issue of "The Cavalry Journal".   After the Japanese invasion on December 8, 1941, the 26th participated in the Allied withdrawal to the Bataan Peninsula. In doing so, the unit conducted a classic delaying action that allowed other, less mobile, units to safely withdraw to the peninsula. During the delaying action the 26th provided the "stoutest and only" serious opposition of the withdrawal. In the initial landings of the Japanese Imperial Army invasion, the Regiment alone delayed the advance of four enemy infantry regiments for six hours at Damortis, a town in the Lingayen Gulf, and on December 24 repulsed a tank assault at the town of Binalonan, Pangasinan. However, the resistance was not without cost, as by the end of that day, the Regiment had been reduced down to 450 men. Colorized photo of Capt. John Wheeler's troopers. Photo appeared in Life Magazine in 1941. Colorized by Sean Conejos.   Following these events, the Regiment was pulled off the line and brought back up to a strength of 657 men, who in January 1942 held open the roadways to the Bataan Peninsula allowing other units to prepare for their stand there. 26th Cavalrymen pass an M3 tank, December 1941.   On Bataan, a 26th Cavalry Troop, consisting mostly of Filipino Troopers and led by Lt. Edwin Ramsey performed the last U.S. Cavalry horse mounted charge to engage an enemy in warfare. This charge occurred at the town of Morong, Bataan on January 16, 1942. Lt. Edwin Ramsey on Brynn Awryn prior to the beginning of WWII. He led the last wartime U.S. Cavalry charge. Col. Edwin Ramsey recounts how the Last Cavalry Charge came about.   Following this, due to a shortage of food, their mounts were butchered and the regiment was converted into two squadrons, one a motorized rifle squadron, the other a mechanized squadron utilizing the remaining scout cars and Bren carriers. Other actions of the 26th Cavalry are; Following the delaying action down the central Luzon plain, 26th Cavalry Troop C was cut off from the rest of the Regiment, having been ordered into Northern Luzon in an attempt to defend Baguio by Major General Wainwright in late December 1941. In January 1942, the unit, with assistance from 71st Infantry and elements of the 11th Infantry raided Tuguegarao Airfield, destroying several planes and causing enemy casualties. Eventually the unit was supplemented by other soldiers and guerrillas, and remained an effective fighting force well into 1943. The remnants of Troop C would later be integrated into the United States Army Forces in the Philippines-Northern Luzon. Other guerrilla organizations were led by Officers of the regiment like Lt. Edwin Ramsey who ignored the surrender orders (and other Filipino enlisted men) who escaped from Bataan to form a substantial guerrilla resistance force against the Japanese Imperial Army. Rudy Cabigas, a retired San Jose Fire Department Captain, representing a Filipino trooper of the legendary 26th Cavalry, Philippine Scouts. His father and uncle served with the 26th.        … [Read more...]

1st National Arnis Congress a Success!

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1st National Arnis Congress a Success! by Tambuli Media Original article at: http://www.tambulimedia.com/2017/01/14/1st-national-arnis-congress-success/ by Bambit Dulay Senator Juan Miguel Zubiri called for unity among arnis organizations and practitioners during the opening of the 1st Arnis Congress at the Philippine Red Cross Multi-Purpose Hall in Mandaluyong City on Thursday. Zubiri, an arnis practitioner himself, is the author of Republic Act 9850 or Arnis Law declaring arnis as the national martial art and sport of the Philippines. Over 250 practitioners from more than 100 organizations attended the event, which is said to be the largest historical gathering of arnisador (arnis practitioner) to date. “This gathering is the biggest gathering in our history and in my experience as an arnisador since 1986. Grandmasters of major styles of arnis all over the country from Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao are here and screaming in one voice that we would be united,” said Zubiri in an interview. Zubiri lamented the fact that arnis is more respected and appreciated in the United States and Europe. “Many of our international organizations present here have their respective international headquarters in America and Germany. Why is it that arnis is more popular there unlike in our own country?” “Now we are taking a hands-on approach with the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) and I am so happy with the support of PSC Chairman William Ramirez,” he said. According to Zubiri, PSC is the lead agency mandated by law to assist in the creation of a national unified organization for arnis. “Under the law, it is he (Ramirez) who will lead us to this direction,” he said. Zubiri said that the new unified organization will be called Alliance of Filipino Martial Arts or AFMA but the name is yet to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Ramirez has pledged to fund the organization to boost arnis’ popularity in its homeland. “We are committed to support them financially so that Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) will really grow,” said Ramirez. “We don’t ask any budget from PSC. As a matter of fact, we have sponsors for this but we welcome the move of the Chairman to help financially but I promised and told him earlier that we will make sure that every centavo will be liquidated if ever we will be needing their help,” Zubiri added. Zubiri stressed that AFMA will be inclusive, democratic and consultative. “We will not scrap or discriminate any organizations. As a matter of fact, we are extending our hands of support and welcome the group of Raymond Velayo so that they may join us in this organization.” Velayo is the president of Arnis Philippines, the national sports association of arnis, under the Philippine Olympic Committee. “Let us work together because this is an alliance of FMA. This is not just one organization but an alliance of all FMA,” said Zubiri. … [Read more...]

Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite asks the question – “Are you a dedicated student or are you a butterfly?”

Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite asks the question – “Are you a dedicated student or are you a butterfly?”   Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite solía hablar de la “mariposa”, aquella que flota de flor en flor, que toma un poco de néctar de aquí y de alla, no dedicándose a cualquier ubicación por un periodo de tiempo adecuado para llegar a ser plenamente alimentada y crecer fuerte. PG Sulite decía que esto es similar al comportamiento del estudiante que constantemente va de una fuente a otra (de Instructor a Instructor) recogiendo generalidades pero nunca dominando el fundamento básico, debido a su falta de compromiso e impaciencia para permanecer en un lugar el tiempo suficiente para desarrollarse combativamente. Un entrenamiento de esa naturaleza tendrá más debilidades que fortalezas, recordemos que en el entrenamiento no buscamos la mera acumulación de técnicas pues algunas partes parecerán tener lógica, otras más no sabremos donde ponerlas, lo que buscamos es el desarrollo de las habilidades combativas, aquellas que nos permitirán protegernos o proteger a nuestros seres queridos en caso de necesidad. Así pues, la pregunta que debemos hacernos es: ¿soy un estudiante dedicado o soy una mariposa? ****** Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite used to talk about the ‘ butterfly “, Someone who floats from flower to flower, which takes a little bit of nectar from here and there, not dedicating themselves to any location for a period of time suitable for to become fully fuelled and grow strong. Punong Guro Sulite said that this is similar to the behaviour of the student who constantly goes from a source to another (from instructor to instructor) picking up generalizations, but never dominating the basic thrust, due to their lack of commitment and impatience to stay in one place long enough To develop combativamente. A training of this nature will have more weaknesses that strengths, let us remember that in the training we are not looking for the mere accumulation of techniques because some parts seem to have logic, other more we will not know where to put them, what we are looking for is the development of the skills combativas, those that Will allow us to protect us or protect our loved ones in time of need. So, the question that we must ask is: am I a dedicated  student or I am a butterfly? … [Read more...]

Sen. Miguel Zubiri, Author and Sponsor of the National Arnis Law (Rep. Act 9850) gave this message during the First National Arnis Congress held at the Red Cross Headquarters Multipurpose Hall, Mandaluyong City, Philippines, on January 12, 2017.

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Sen. Miguel Zubiri, Author and Sponsor of the National Arnis Law (Rep. Act 9850) gave this message during the First National Arnis Congress held at the Red Cross Headquarters Multipurpose Hall, Mandaluyong City, Philippines, on January 12, 2017.   By: Joy @ https://thedeadlydance.wordpress.com/tag/national-arnis-congress-2017/ Sen. Miguel Zubiri, Author and Sponsor of the National Arnis Law (Rep. Act 9850) gave this message during the First National Arnis Congress held at the Red Cross Headquarters Multipurpose Hall, Mandaluyong City, Philippines, on January 12, 2017. He asked his staff to email this to me and I’m printing it as is. “My love affair with Arnis started many years ago, when I was a young teenager training in martial arts, fascinated by traditional Chinese and Japanese weaponry. As young boys, we all wanted to be just like Ezekiel Thompson of the movie, “Force Five” played by weapons expert Richard Norton for his expertise in different weapons systems. Inspired by these icons, I started training with these weapons systems under 9th Dan, Sensie Robert Campbell of the Uechi-Ryu Okinawan Karate while doing my open hands training and kick boxing skills with Master Topher Ricketts of Bakbakan and Sagasa Karate System. When Master Topher saw that I was interested in weapons, he asked me to try Arnis. My first reaction was “Why?”. All 16 year olds at that time wanted to be like Sho Kusugi from all the Ninja films. But then he told me to trust him about the effectiveness of the Filipino Martial Art. I guess at that time, hindi uso maging Arnisador as it wasn’t as famous as those weapons systems seen in the movies. Unlike today, where we see Tom Cruise or Matt Damon doing FMA on screen, to the delight of all FMA practitioners. So one afternoon, in 1986, Master Topher introduced me to a short and stocky man in his mid-twenties who had the biggest forearms I had ever seen. I clearly recall telling him that he had “Popeye arms”, which broke the ice and started a wonderful friendship between student and master. His name was Master Edgar Sulite. My first lesson from him was a realization of how deadly and effective our Arnis system was in the real world. He would ask me to throw sticks, and even tennis balls at him, while doing the sinawali and to my amazement; it was impossible for me to penetrate his defense. He would then show Knife fighting techniques and empty hand techniques including takedowns, which were truly effective for real life situations and not just for fancy movie props and entertainment. I was in love… in love with this martial art and there was no turning back. I discovered for myself that we had a hidden gem, a secret treasure. A martial art that was so unassuming yet so effective, so complex and yet so simple, so graceful and yet so deadly. But most of all, it was our very own Filipino Martial Art. From then on, I met and trained with other legends like Grand Master Antonio Illustrissimo and GM Tony Diego, under the watchful eye of my adopted father figure Master Rickettes. It was at this time that I saw how the art and sport grew. I had the opportunity to compete in several national competitions and the honor to represent the Philippins at the First World Arnis Tournament held at the Ninoy Aquino Stadium in 1989, under the invitation of the Cañete Family of Doce Pares and WEKAF. I will forever be greatful to them for allowing me to compete in their tournament. Unfortunately, as the sport grew, so did the intrigues. I have seen for myself how little by little, we have been tearing each other apart rather than staying united. On how groups were starting to feel unwelcome because of certain personalities. Or being deemed “disloyal” for joining certain activities not “sanctioned” by governing bodies. This should never be the case. I, myself was a victim as well, of this brand of destructive politics in sports. In 1991, I was not allowed to participate in the SEA Games Arnis competition even if I was the reigning National Champion because of the simple reason that I had joined tournaments sponsored by other organizations. Again, this should never happen. I believe that every one of you, your students and your followers, should have the support and encouragement from the government and our national organization to enhance your skills and strengthen your art and style. No jealousy, no discrimination; only support and guidance. Moving forward, through the efforts of Grand Master Roland Dantes and several Arnisador, I filed SB #3288 and in 2009, we finally passed it as RA 9850. Unfortunately, GM Roland was never able to see it made into law as he passed away before it was approved. Let us recognize his efforts. Let us give GM Roland Dantes a rousing round of applause for all his efforts to unify our Martial Art and Spots through legislation, and this is what we are recognizing today. Not just the … [Read more...]

Memorare Manila 1945 Monument. Dedicated to the over 100,000 Civilian Filipino’s killed by Japanese Troops and American Bombing

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Memorare Manila 1945 Monument Courtesy of: http://malacanang.gov.ph/75085-briefer-memorare-manila-1945-monument/   The Memorare – Manila 1945 Monument commemorates the lives lost during the battle for the liberation of Manila, waged by Filipino and American forces against Imperial Japanese troops from February 3, 1945, to March 3, 1945. The monument was unveiled on February 18, 1995. It stands at the center of Intramuros, in Plaza de Sta. Isabel at the corner of General Luna and Anda Streets. It was constructed mainly through the efforts of the Memorare – Manila 1945 Foundation Inc., a private, non-profit organization founded by the civilian survivors of the Battle of Manila and their descendants. Sculpted by Peter de Guzman, the monument’s main feature is the figure of a hooded woman slumped on the ground in great despair for the lifeless child she cradles in her arms. Six suffering figures surround her, a glimpse of the great despair brought about by the gruesome massacres that were perpetrated all over the city inflicted by Imperial Japanese soldiers on civilians during the liberation of the city. The inscription on the base was penned by Nick Joaquin, National Artist for Literature: This memorial is dedicated to all those innocent victims of war, many of whom went nameless and unknown to a common grave, or never even knew a grave at all, their bodies having been consumed by fire or crushed to dust beneath the rubble of ruins. Let this monument be a gravestone for each and every one of the over 100,000 men, women, children and infants killed in Manila during its battle of liberation, Feb. 3 to March 3, 1945. We have never forgotten them. Nor shall we ever forget. May they rest in peace as part now of the sacred ground of this city: The Manila of our affection. February 18, 1995.” … [Read more...]

The Philippine-American War,1899–1902 by Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs, United States Department of State

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The Philippine-American War,1899–1902 from: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1899-1913/war After its defeat in the Spanish-American War of 1898, Spain ceded its longstanding colony of the Philippines to the United States in the Treaty of Paris. On February 4, 1899, just two days before the U.S. Senate ratified the treaty, fighting broke out between American forces and Filipino nationalists led by Emilio Aguinaldo who sought independence rather than a change in colonial rulers. The ensuing Philippine-American War lasted three years and resulted in the death of over 4,200 American and over 20,000 Filipino combatants. As many as 200,000 Filipino civilians died from violence, famine, and disease. “Battle of Manila Bay” The decision by U.S. policymakers to annex the Philippines was not without domestic controversy. Americans who advocated annexation evinced a variety of motivations: desire for commercial opportunities in Asia, concern that the Filipinos were incapable of self-rule, and fear that if the United States did not take control of the islands, another power (such as Germany or Japan) might do so. Meanwhile, American opposition to U.S. colonial rule of the Philippines came in many forms, ranging from those who thought it morally wrong for the United States to be engaged in colonialism, to those who feared that annexation might eventually permit the non-white Filipinos to have a role in American national government. Others were wholly unconcerned about the moral or racial implications of imperialism and sought only to oppose the policies of PresidentWilliam McKinley’s administration. After the Spanish-American War, while the American public and politicians debated the annexation question, Filipino revolutionaries under Aguinaldo seized control of most of the Philippines’ main island of Luzon and proclaimed the establishment of the independent Philippine Republic. When it became clear that U.S. forces were intent on imposing American colonial control over the islands, the early clashes between the two sides in 1899 swelled into an all-out war. Americans tended to refer to the ensuing conflict as an “insurrection” rather than acknowledge the Filipinos’ contention that they were fighting to ward off a foreign invader. Emilio Aguinaldo There were two phases to the Philippine-American War. The first phase, from February to November of 1899, was dominated by Aguinaldo’s ill-fated attempts to fight a conventional war against the better-trained and equipped American troops. The second phase was marked by the Filipinos’ shift to guerrilla-style warfare. It began in November of 1899, lasted through the capture of Aguinaldo in 1901 and into the spring of 1902, by which time most organized Filipino resistance had dissipated. President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed a general amnesty and declared the conflict over on July 4, 1902, although minor uprisings and insurrections against American rule periodically occurred in the years that followed. The United States entered the conflict with undeniable military advantages that included a trained fighting force, a steady supply of military equipment, and control of the archipelago’s waterways. Meanwhile, the Filipino forces were hampered by their inability to gain any kind of outside support for their cause, chronic shortages of weapons and ammunition, and complications produced by the Philippines’ geographic complexity. Under these conditions, Aguinaldo’s attempt to fight a conventional war in the first few months of the conflict proved to be a fatal mistake; the Filipino Army suffered severe losses in men and material before switching to the guerrilla tactics that might have been more effective if employed from the beginning of the conflict. President Theodore Roosevelt The war was brutal on both sides. U.S. forces at times burned villages, implemented civilian reconcentration policies, and employed torture on suspected guerrillas, while Filipino fighters also tortured captured soldiers and terrorized civilians who cooperated with American forces. Many civilians died during the conflict as a result of the fighting, cholera and malaria epidemics, and food shortages caused by several agricultural catastrophes. Even as the fighting went on, the colonial government that the United States established in the Philippines in 1900 under future President William Howard Taft launched a pacification campaign that became known as the “policy of attraction.” Designed to win over key elites and other Filipinos who did not embrace Aguinaldo’s plans for the Philippines, this policy permitted a significant degree of self-government, introduced social reforms, and implemented plans for economic development. Over time, this program gained important Filipino adherents and undermined the revolutionaries’ popular appeal, which significantly aided the United States’ military effort to win the war. In 1907, the … [Read more...]

U.S. WAR CRIMES IN THE PHILIPPINES, (1898-1899). By World Future Fund

 U.S. WAR CRIMES IN THE PHILIPPINES Courtesy of: http://www.worldfuturefund.org/wffmaster/Reading/war.crimes/US/U.S.Philippines.htm .   The U.S. occupation of the Philippine Islands came about as a result of military operations against the Spanish Empire during the Spanish-American war of 1898-99.  The seizure of the Philippines by the United States, however, was not unplanned.  American eyes had been set on the Philippines since before the outbreak of war.  To many prominent Americans, establishing a colony in the Philippines was a logical extension of the nation's "manifest destiny" to play a leading role on the world stage.  An expanded American presence in Asia was also thought to have significant commercial advantages for the nation, since American companies could then participate directly in large Asian markets. For all the alleged advantages to possessing the Philippines, no thought was given to whether or not native Filipinos would welcome American as opposed to Spanish rule.  The Filipinos were of course never informed of American intentions to stay in the Philippines.  This turned out to be a serious error.  By 1898 Filipinos had already shed a considerable amount of blood since rising up in 1896 to free themselves from Spanish domination.  They would not take kindly to a change in colonial administration from Spain to the United States. The First Philippine Republic and the End of Spanish Rule On May 1, 1898, an American fleet under Dewey sailed into Manila harbor and quickly destroyed a small force of Spanish ships anchored there.  Plans for Dewey to commence offensive operations against the Spanish in the Philippines had originated several months before, in February, when Assistant Secretary for the Navy, Theodore Roosevelt, had cabled Dewey to say "Your duty will be to see that the Spanish squadron does not leave the Asiatic coast ... start offensive operations in Philippine Islands."[1] Because a considerable number of Spanish troops remained stationed throughout the Philippines, including a large force in Manila itself, American diplomats urged resistance leader Emilio Aguinaldo to return to the Philippines from exile in Hong Kong.  Before journeying to his homeland, Aguinaldo, who was overjoyed at the American declaration of war on Spain, cabled resistance members the following message, which clearly expresses his belief that the Americans had come to liberate his people: "Divine Providence is about to place independence within our reach.  The Americans, not from mercenary motives, but for the sake of humanity and the lamentations of so many persecuted people have considered it opportune to extend their protecting mantle to our beloved country. ... At the present moment an American squadron is preparing to sail to the Philippines. The Americans will attack by sea and prevent any re-enforcements coming from Spain. ... We insurgents must attack by land. ... There where you see the American flag flying, assemble in number; they are our redeemers!"[2] Aguinaldo sent another message several days later expressing the same confidence in American altruism: "Filipinos, the great nation, North America, cradle of liberty and friendly on that account to the liberty of our people ... has come to manifest a protection ... which is disinterested towards us, considering us with sufficient civilization to govern by ourselves this our unhappy land."[3] Energized by the seemingly fortunate turn of events, the Filipinos immediately went on the offensive.  Within weeks Aguinaldo's insurgents had pushed the Spanish back to Manila.  Fighting would continue for another two months, until American forces arrived in enough numbers to complete the defeat of Spanish troops holed up in Manila.  Aguinaldo and his men were ecstatic with their victory and on June 12, 1898 they proclaimed Filipino independence.  The First Philippine Republic had been founded. What the Americans Promised the Filipinos The declaration of a Philippine Republic should not have come as a shock to the Americans.  No American military commander or politician had formally promised the Filipinos independence after the end of fighting, but this is not the impression that motivated Emilio Aguinaldo and his men.  Statements made by several of the participants in these events suggest that by supporting the armed resistance of Filipinos to the Spanish, the United States was de facto guaranteeing the Filipinos their independence.  For example, American Consul Wildman in Hong Kong wrote at the time, "the United States undertook this war [against Spain] for the sole purpose of relieving the Cubans from the cruelties under which they were suffering and not for the love of conquests or the hope of gain.  They are actuated by precisely the same feelings for the Filipinos."[4]  Admiral Dewey emphasized that during the liberation of the islands the Filipinos had cooperated directly … [Read more...]

World War 2 U.S. Army’s 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment, 2nd Regiment receiving “Bolo” knives in a special ceremony.

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World War 2 U.S. Army's 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment, 2nd Regiment receiving "Bolo" knives in a special ceremony. In the annual 1943 yearbook of the U.S. Army's 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment, this page featured the 2nd Regiment receiving "Bolo" knives in a special ceremony. This took place in 1943 at their training location of Camp Cooke, California. Prominent Los Angeles businessmen visited the "Sulung" Regiment to make this presentation. Receiving their weapons were the officers and senior Non commissioned officers (NCO's). The enlisted personnel had already training with their weapons which had been previously issued. The entire regiment paraded waving their weapons in the air past the regimental staff, dignitaries and visitors. Music was provided by the "Sulung Band" and it was indeed a day to remember for families and their guests. — at Camp Cooke, CA (near Lompoc, CA - now Vandenberg AFB).       … [Read more...]

August 1942 Newsreel: US ARMY 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment

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August 1942 Newsreel: US ARMY 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment Video at this LINK: https://archive.org/details/ARC-38917           … [Read more...]

World War 2 Filipino-American “Bolo” knife fighting during a unit practice. U.S. Army’s 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment.

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World War 2 Filipino-American  "Bolo" knife fighting during a unit practice. U.S. Army's 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment. Photo property of: Community Relations Liaison for 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments and 1st Reconnaissance Battalion (Special), U.S. Army, 1942-1946 https://www.facebook.com/pelagio.valdez?fref=nf   #LagingUnaBoloMatchUp This platoon was assigned to the U.S. Army's 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment. It conducted "Bolo" knife fighting during a unit practice. The regimental commander, Colonel Robert H. Offley authorized that the members of his unit add "Bolos" to their combat inventory. When the 1st Filipino Battalion was formed on April 1, 1942, many inductees who were farmhands in civilian life brought their own field machetes with them to training. In this photo, "Pinoy" soldiers awaited their turn in a large circle. This was like modern day "pugil stick" fighting. In the rear, you can see more soldiers also waiting their turn. This took place at Camp Roberts, California which was a major field training area of the 1st Regiment in 1943. "LAGING UNA" - "ALWAYS FIRST" "SULUNG" - "FORWARD" "BAHALA NA!" - "COME WHAT MAY!" "IN HONOR OF OUR FATHERS!" "74TH ANNIVERSARY (1942-2016)"     1st Filipino Infantry Regimental Headquarters Camp San Luis Obispo … [Read more...]

WORLD WAR 2 SOLDIER JUMPING TOWARDS CAMERA WITH BOLO KNIFE/MACHETE DURING TRAINING MANEUVERS AT SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA ON 27 MARCH 1944.

SOLDIER JUMPING TOWARDS CAMERA WITH BOLO KNIFE/MACHETE DURING TRAINING MANEUVERS AT SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA ON 27 MARCH 1944. Photo property of: http://www.ww2online.org/image/soldier-jumping-towards-camera-bolo-knifemachete-during-training-maneuvers-san-louis-obispo       1014. Photograph. Soldier jumping towards camera with Bolo knife/machete during training maneuvers. “3-27-44. Allen. Sgt John Petarsky, Bat B 506 AAA Bn wastes no time in rushing the enemy. Sgt Petarsky is squad leader of an Ambush Squad. Photo taken during a Division problem near Morro Bay Calif. 168-L-44-1086.” Army Signal Corps photograph. Photographer: Allen. Camp San Louis Obispo, California. 27 March 1944   DATE: 27 Mar 1944- LOCATION: Morro Bay HOMETOWN: BRANCH: Army … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Lameco and Ilustrisimo Eskrima Seminar. August 13th, 2016. Moses Lake, Washington.

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Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Lameco and Ilustrisino Eskrima Seminar. Moses Lake, Washington. … [Read more...]

Seminar: Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour 2016 with Guro Dino Flores

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Seminar: Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour 2016 with Guro Dino Flores https://www.facebook.com/LAMECOESKRIMAKALISILUSTRISIMO/timeline https://vimeo.com/170345485 https://youtu.be/f-7qJgs418I Seminar Spain Video 2 Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour Come train with one of Lameco S.O.G´s and Kali Ilustrisimo´s most combat oriented Instructors. Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour – July 2016 Come train with one of Lameco S.O.G´s and Kali Ilustrisimo´s most combat oriented Instructors – Guro Dino Flores! Guro Dino has almost 25 years of experience with Lameco Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Dino was one of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite favorite fighters from the Infamous Lameco Backyard Group. In the Lameco Backyard, fancy drills were always secondary – various degrees of sparring intensity always came first. He was personally trained by Punong Guro to be a fighter above all else. Even accepting challenges on Punong Guro Sulite’s behalf. He is also is an Authorized Instructor under Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts and Grandmaster Antonio Diego. During Master Ricketts time in the USA, Guro Dino was one of his assistants. Constantly sparring people at Master Ricketts request. He has also had the good fortune to train with all Five Pillars of Ilustrisimo and was one of the few members of the notorious LAMECO S.O.G. He is currently the director and an Instructor of the Kapisanang Mandirigma Institute founded by members of Lameco S.O.G. Join us in Madrid and Ibiza. Guro Dino will be taking it a high level of intensity. As an option only – for those who want to take full advantage of this combat oriented training, bring you sparring gear. To add to the excitement, Guro Dino will also be accompanied by two of his most skilled fighters – Brett Granstaff and Mark Ramos. Find out for yourself why Lameco S.O.G. and Kali Ilustrisimo is respected in the Martial Art World. More information about Guro Dino Flores at this link: http://backyardeskrima.com/?page_id=52 Guro Dino Flores will be conducting Action Packed seminars in IBIZA AND MADRID. Guro Dino is only in Europe periodically. Don’t miss this very rare opportunity!!!   IBIZA Seminar 12 hours 15th and 16th , OF JULY 2016 120 Euros if paid before May 30th 150 Euros after May 30th     MADRID Workshop 8 hours 23 RD OF JULY Saturday From 9:00 am to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 20:00 pm. 70 Euros if paid before May 30th, 2016 85 Euros after May 30th   Special prices for groups.   For more information – Contact Guro Dino’s LAMECO S.O.G and Kali Ilustrisimo Representative in Spain, Tim Fredianelli: fredianellibruno@gmail.com   More Seminar Information at: http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=1813 and http://mandirigma.org/?p=2957               … [Read more...]

Seminar: Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour 2016 with Guro Dino Flores

Seminar Spain 2016

Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour Come train with one of Lameco S.O.G´s and Kali Ilustrisimo´s most combat oriented Instructors. Lameco S.O.G. & Kali Ilustrisimo European Tour - July 2016 Come train with one of Lameco S.O.G´s and Kali Ilustrisimo´s most combat oriented Instructors - Guro Dino Flores! Guro Dino has almost 25 years of experience with Lameco Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Dino was one of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite favorite fighters from the Infamous Lameco Backyard Group. In the Lameco Backyard, fancy drills were always secondary - various degrees of sparring intensity always came first. He was personally trained by Punong Guro to be a fighter above all else. Even accepting challenges on Punong Guro Sulite’s behalf. He is also is an Authorized Instructor under Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts and Grandmaster Antonio Diego. During Master Ricketts time in the USA, Guro Dino was one of his assistants. Constantly sparring people at Master Ricketts request. He has also had the good fortune to train with all Five Pillars of Ilustrisimo and was one of the few members of the notorious LAMECO S.O.G. He is currently the director and an Instructor of the Kapisanang Mandirigma Institute founded by members of Lameco S.O.G. Join us in Madrid and Ibiza. Guro Dino will be taking it a high level of intensity. As an option only - for those who want to take full advantage of this combat oriented training, bring you sparring gear. To add to the excitement, Guro Dino will also be accompanied by two of his most skilled fighters - Brett Granstaff and Mark Ramos. Find out for yourself why Lameco S.O.G. and Kali Ilustrisimo is respected in the Martial Art World. More information about Guro Dino Flores at this link: http://backyardeskrima.com/?page_id=52 Guro Dino Flores will be conducting Action Packed seminars in IBIZA AND MADRID. Guro Dino is only in Europe periodically. Don’t miss this very rare opportunity!!!   IBIZA Seminar 12 hours 15th and 16th , OF JULY 2016 120 Euros if paid before May 30th 150 Euros after May 30th     MADRID Workshop 8 hours 23 RD OF JULY Saturday From 9:00 am to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 20:00 pm. 70 Euros if paid before May 30th, 2016 85 Euros after May 30th   Special prices for groups.   For more information - Contact Guro Dino’s LAMECO S.O.G and Kali Ilustrisimo Representative in Spain, Tim Fredianelli: fredianellibruno@gmail.com   More Seminar Information at: http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=1813 and http://mandirigma.org/?p=2957     … [Read more...]

Grandmaster Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan Balintawak Seminar. June 18th, 2016. Glendale FMA, California.

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Grandmaster Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan Balintawak Seminar About Grandmaster Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan “Standing at 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighting no more that 120 pounds, Venancio “Anciong” Baconwas a very unassuming man. He was a veteran of a great many “death” matches in Cebu. Described by many of his students as lightning fast, Venancio Bacon maneuvered through a fight smoothly while exploiting his opponents’ balance and coordination. He was known to be very surgical with a stick, able to employ varying force to his exact targets throughout his adversary’s body. But, his greatest virtue and asset was his constant desire to innovate and improve his art, diligently discovering techniques through the years, never ceasing in this path. He taught his art to those who desired to learn it.” At age 16, Nonato “Nene” Gaabucayan was introduced to Venancio “Anciong” Bacon’s BALINTAWAK. In early 1976, “Nene” Gaabucayan moved to Cebu City from Cagayan de Oro to attend college. He lived in a boarding house owned by “Ben” Marapao in Urgello area. Upon learning that Nene was interested in continuing his Karate training, Dr. Marapao suggested he take up Eskrima. Nene attended one training session, in which he was given a demonstration by Teofilo Velez. He’d never seen anything like it, since then he had always been a loyal student and teacher of BALINTAWAK. Along with Teofilo Velez, Nene trained with Bobby Taboada, Chito Velez, Monnie Velez, Eddie Velez, Romeo de la Rosa, and Hector Rizzari. Training was hard, and he made a point to be there every day. Like a sponge, everybody poured whatever Balintawak knowledge they had to this very eager 16 year old. In return, he learned from them. At 18, Nene began teaching his own crop of students in Lapu-Lapu City. He divided his time between his studies at the Philippine Air Force College of Aeronautics and the YMCA in Lapu-Lapu. After completing his studies in Cebu, Nene returned to Cagayan de Oro. As one of Teofilo Velez’ master instructors, he carried the Gold Chapter of Teovel Balintawak. He continued to teach Balintawak. In 1987, Nene traveled to Germany and later to Switzerland to teach BALINTAWAK. He stayed in Europe for 3 years, then returned to Cagayan de Oro. Nene has been teaching BALINTAWAK for 35 years.   For more information: https://www.facebook.com/groups/367399160092901/ … [Read more...]

Punong Guro Edgar Sulites Influences in creating Lameco Eskrima. Courtesy of Guro Dave Gould.

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Punong Guro Edgar Sulites Influences in creating Lameco Eskrima. Courtesy of Guro Dave Gould. Below is a poster which I placed together showing the Major and Minor Influences which Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite credited for his knowledge and for the creation of the Lameco Eskrima System. In essence these Grandmasters, their systems and knowledge were responsible for the Lameco Eskrima System that we know and train today. In addition to the numerous actual experiences which PG Sulite drew from and the thousands of hours of sparring and fighting with his two primary sparring partners, Master Christopher N. Ricketts and Master Jun Pueblos.The Major Influences were from Masters and Systems which PG Edgar G. Sulite thoroughly trained under for years and was certified to teach their respective styles. The Minor Systems were from Masters with whom PG Edgar G. Sulite trained to some degree and with whom he collaborated but never received ranking in their respective Systems.  5 Major Influences on the Lameco Eskrima System: * De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orihinal (GM Jose D. Caballero) * Kali Illustrisimo (GM Antonio “Tatang” Illustrisimo) * Kali Pekiti-Tirsia (Tuhon Leo Tortal Gaje Jr.) * Modernos Largos (GM Jesus Abella & GM Pablicito “Pabling” Cabahug) * Sulite Rapelon (GM Helacrio Sulite Sr.) 6 Minor Influences on the Lameco Eskrima System: * Doce Pares (GM Diony Canete) * Balintawak (GM Johnny Chiuten) * Lapunti Arnis De Abanico (GM Felimon E. Caburnay) * Siete Teros Serado – Serado no Puwede Entra (GM Marcelino Ancheta Sr.) * Abanico De Sungkiti (GM Billy Baaclo) * Tres Personas Eskrima De Combate (GM Maj. Timoteo E. Maranga)   … [Read more...]

Rest In Peace Master Alexander Lim Co – April 12th, 2016

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Alexander Lim Co Alexander Lim Co is a living treasure in the arts of Chinese kung-fu. In fact, no name is more synonymous with Kung-Fu in the Philippines than Alexander Co. He spearheaded the Chin Wu Club in Manila, wrote the first kung-fu book ever published in the Philippines, and published the country’s first martial arts magazine, simply titled “Martial Arts Magazine.” Co has studied a dozen different kung-fu styles, was an “in-door” disciple of Ngo Cho Kun’s late grandmaster Tan Ka Hong, and has studied Seven Star Praying Mantis and Hung-gar under Grandmaster Shakespeare Chan, Wu style Tai Chi Chuan under the late Master John Hu Chuan Hai, and Hsin-I Liu Ha Pa Fa under Master David Chan. Alexander Co is the Advising Grandmaster of The International Beng Hong Athletic Association. He has served as Chairman of the Philippine-Chinese Beng Kiam Athletic Association and the Tsing Hua Ngo Cho Kung-fu Center and as Vice-chairman of the Hsin-I Society of Internal Arts. In addition to dozens of articles featured in such magazines as Martial Arts Magazine, Rapid Journal, Inside Kung-Fu, Martial Arts Illustrated, and Martial Arts Legends. Grandmaster Co has written three books: Secrets of Seven Star Praying Mantis, The Way of Ngo Cho Kun and Five Ancestor Fist Kung-Fu, and is translator of The Bible of Ngo Cho Kun. He also filmed a series of instructional videos “The Essence of Ngo Cho Kun” and “The Essence of Seven Star Praying Mantis” for Unique Publications Video. ---   Ronnie Ricketts I was saddened to hear of the passing of a good friend and a great master, Alex Co . He was an amazing influence in the lives of our Bakbakan brothers. Our sincerest condolences to the family and may you rest in peace, Master Alex! ‎Lance Velez‎ The loss of Master Alex is a loss to the world of martial arts. He knew so much and shared his knowledge with those who showed Interest, with no reservation , he was a true master of his art and I am sad that I wasn't able to spend more time with him... It hurts that I no longer have his counsel and insight when I have questions the thought that we will no longer have our conversations is heartbreaking. I will do my best to maintain and master what you taught me so in my own small way I can preserve the art of Ngo Cho ... Rest in peace Master Alex ... I will miss you ... Mark Wiley‎  It is with a heavy heart that I mourn the passing of one of my best friends, big brother and kung-fu master, Sifu Alex Co. He passed at 10:34 PM Manila time, April 12, 2016. His kind and loving heart and openness in sharing his passion for all martial arts with all people was unmatched. He is one of the legends of the Philippine martial arts masters, who brought all together from every discipline. He suffered much these past years with heart troubles, kidney failure, diabetes, digital amputation... But his drive to keep documenting and spreading the arts he loved was unstoppable. My son, Alex, is named in his honor and forever I will treasure his memory in my heart. ---  It is with a heavy heart that I mourn your passing, Sifu Alex, you are one of my best friends, big brother, father and kung-fu master. Our long relationship is deeply embedded in my heart and I am struggling with not being able to call you and talk or come for a visit. You are among the most important people in my life and I can't imagine my future without you here. Rest in peace.       Doran Sordo Master Alex Co was an exceptional human being. He was one of the best friends of my master, Christopher Ricketts. He was very strict when he would be teaching us. Always keen on the details. It was because of Master Topher that I met, got to know, and learned extensively from Master Alex. He was so selfless in his teaching. Breaking from the norm, because of his friendship and trust for Master Topher and the students he would bring by. He was such a kind man. Soft spoken and yet, powerful. I will miss him greatly. He was a cornerstone to our Bakbakan Brotherhood. On one of the last conversations I had with Master Topher, he told me to never stop learning. He mentioned only two people. Master Alex was one of them. Rest in peace, Master. Thank you so much for teaching me. I will never forget it, or you. Paalam Po. Jun Nunez This picture was taken by Grandmaster Topher Rickets of Bakbakan. With me is Grandmaster Edgar Sulite of Lameco Escrima, Master HuTuan Hai of Wu Tai Chi Chuan, and Master Alex Co of Ngo Cho Kun. It's sad to know that I am the only one left with the passing of my friend Alex. Goodbye my friend Felipe P. Jocano Jr. With deep sorrow, I mourn the passing of my kung-fu teacher and friend, Sifu Alexander L.co. He was one of the kindest, most generous and caring men I have had the privilege of meeting and learning from. He not only taught martial arts, he was also an … [Read more...]

Seminar: Lameco SOG Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses and Guro Dino Flores. Las Vegas, Nevada. May 29th, 2016.

Las Vegas, Nevada. May 29th, 2016.

Seminar: Lameco SOG Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses and Guro Dino Flores. Las Vegas, Nevada. May 29th, 2016. https://vimeo.com/163357215   https://vimeo.com/163357215   … [Read more...]

Seminar: Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Brandon Ricketts. Glendale FMA, California. April 9th, 2016.

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 Seminar: Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Brandon Ricketts. Glendale FMA, California. April 9th, 2016.   … [Read more...]

Seminar: Lameco SOG and Kali Ilustrisimo with Guro Dino Flores Guro and Ariel Flores Mosses. March 17th, 2016. Las Vegas.

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  Seminar: Lameco SOG and Kali  Ilustrisimo with Guro Dino Flores Guro and Ariel Flores Mosses. March 17th, 2016. Las Vegas.   … [Read more...]

Ilustrisimo Book

Kali Ilustrisimo: The Sword Fighting Art of Antonio Ilustrisimo By Master Christopher Ricketts, Guro Bruce Ricketts, Guro Brandon Ricketts   http://www.blurb.com/b/6612146-kali-ilustrisimo-the-sword-fighting-art-of-antonio   ABOUT THE BOOK With over 3 decades of intensive training in both Filipino & Chinese disciplines, Christopher Ricketts presents Kali Ilustrisimo as it was taught to him by the now legendary swordsman, Antonio Ilustrisimo. Grandmaster Ricketts brings his insight to this highly regarded fighting art with clarity and precise methodology that is sure to enrich any student regardless of style or system. Lavishly illustrated with diagrams and pictures from Grandmaster Rickett's personal and comprehensive archives, experts and beginners alike stand to benefit greatly from this presentation. Catch a rare glimpse into the inner workings of this uniquely Filipino fighting system. The art and legacy of Antonio Ilustrisimo lives on. Author websitehttps://www.facebook.com/IlustrisimoUSA … [Read more...]

Book: USAFFE by Poweleit, Alvin C., M.D., Major, U.S. Army Medical Corps (Ret.)

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USAFFE by Poweleit, Alvin C., M.D., Major, U.S. Army Medical Corps (Ret.) (Author) USAFFE, the loyal Americans and faithful Filipinos: A saga of atrocities perpetrated during the fall of the Philippines, the Bataan Death March, and Japanese imprisonment and survival Hardcover – 1975 Title USAFFE, the loyal Americans and faithful Filipinos : a saga of atrocities perpetrated during the fall of the Philippines, the Bataan Death March, and Japanese imprisonment and survival / by Alvin C. Poweleit. Subject Poweleit, Alvin C. World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns--Philippines. World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, Japanese. World War, 1939-1945--Health aspects. World War, 1939-1945--Personal narratives, American. Description Wartime diary of the American Surgeon of the Provisional Tank Group, from arrival in the Philippines through the battles for the defense of the Philippines, the Death March, prisoner of war experiences and liberation. Poweleit was a reserve officer called to active duty in 1940, and attached to the 192nd Tank Battalion; he arrived in the Philippines less than a month before the war started. He was with the tank men from the start of the war through the surrender of Bataan; imprisoned in Camp O’Donnell, Cabanatuan and other camps, and then moved to Taiwan in September 1944, where he stayed till the end of the war. The book is not a verbatim publication of his diary proper, but has added information taken from post-war sources. He also recounts the other hell ships and the Palawan Massacre. Creator Poweleit, Alvin C. Publisher [s.l.] : Poweleit, c1975 Date 1975 Format 24 x 16 cm. Type Hardbound Call Number D 767.4 .P68 1975 Accession Number 13978 Pagination vii, 182 p. Illustration ill., maps Keywords Poweleit, Alvin C.; World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns--Philippines.; World War, 1939-1945--Health aspects.; World War, 1939-1945--Personal narratives, American.; World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, Japanese. Collection Diaries Citation Poweleit, Alvin C., “USAFFE, the loyal Americans and faithful Filipinos : a saga of atrocities perpetrated during the fall of the Philippines, the Bataan Death March, and Japanese imprisonment and survival / by Alvin C. Poweleit.,” FHL - Roderick Hall Collection, accessed January 30, 2016, http://rodhall.filipinaslibrary.org.ph/items/show/933.   -----   United States Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) was a military formation of the United States Army active from 1941 to 1946. The new command's headquarters was created on July 26, 1941, at No. 1, Calle Victoria, Manila, Luzon, the Philippines, with General Douglas MacArthur as commander. The Chief of Staff was Brigadier General Richard K. Sutherland and the Deputy Chief of Staff was Lieutenant ColonelRichard J. Marshall. The core of this command (including MacArthur, Marshall, and Sutherland) was drawn from the Office of the Military Advisor to the Commonwealth Government.         … [Read more...]

Book: Crusaders in the Far East: The Moro Wars in the Philippines in the Context of the Ibero-Islamic World War Truxillo by Charles

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Crusaders in the Far East: The Moro Wars in the Philippines in the Context of the Ibero-Islamic World War By Charles Truxillo Early modern warfare between Spaniards and Muslims for control of the Philippine Islands was set within the context of the larger Iberian offensive against the Islamic world in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The struggle was on a global scale from the coast of North Africa to the Southern Seas. Moreover, the antiquity of Christian-Muslim wars in Spain and the flood tide of Counter-Reformation Catholic and Sufi-Islamic expansions in the sixteenth century gave special significance to theconvergence of these factors in the Philippines. The contemporary resurgence of Islam and the continuing rebellion of the Moros in the southern Philippines makes this study relevant to modern concerns. This survey will establish the circumstances of the Ibero-Islamic World War in the context of traditional, pre-modern societies on the verge of modernity. Change in the nature of historical action was represented during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, not by Spain and Portugal or any Islamic society, but rather by Holland and later England. The Iberian and Islamic participants of the first global conflict will appear to be traditional societies involved in geo-political circumstances beyond their capacities as pre-modern, agrarian-based, citied peoples. The Moro Wars in the Philippines represent the closing of an older world in Island Southeast Asia; the demise of Iberian dreams of an oriental empire, and the halting of a thousand years of hemisphere-wide Islamic expansionism. Modernity was the outcome of the seventeenth century's technical-capitalist revolution which established the enlarged political franchise of Northern Europe. These developments, in turn, were the instruments of European world domination in the nineteenth century. During the twentieth century, modernization has evolved non-Western European forms, spreading to Russia, Eastern Europe, Turkey, India, and the Far East. In contrast, the majority of Hispanic and Islamic societies remain underdeveloped, seemingly transfixed by the accomplishments of the past. The legacy of the Ibero-Islamic World War is still manifest in the charismatic politics, military governments, religious agendas, landed aristocracies, literary educations, patrimonial families, and masculine styles of most Muslim and Latin American societies. … [Read more...]

Books: Books on America and the Philippine Moros by Robert A. Fulton

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Books on America and the Moros by Robert A. Fulton http://www.morolandhistory.com/Books_page/Book_Page.htm         Released January 15, 2012     The Battle of Bud Dajo took place over three days, March 5-8, 1906. It pitted the U.S. Army. U.S. Navy, and the Philippine Constabulary against 800-1,000 dissident Muslims who had fortified the top of a rugged, 2,175 feet high dormant volcano on the island of Jolo in the southern Philippine Islands. Although beginning as a genuine military contest, it ended as a tragic and terrible, one-sided massacre, with no more than a small and pitiful handful of the Muslims left alive.      Although lesser known. It ranks beside such infamous names as "Sand Creek" (1864), "Wounded Knee"(1890), and "My Lai" (1968) as one of the darkest, bloodiest, and most controversial episodes in America's long and troubled history of deadly encounters with indigenous peoples.     More than just a straightforward account of an epic fight on a spectacular mountain, it is also the story of a second and equally vicious donnybrook within the nations' press and on the floor of Congress to comprehend what had actually occurred on that remote field of battle and why. At stake were the careers of one the most well known soldiers of the early 20th Century, General Leonard Wood, former commanding officer of the famed Spanish-American War cavalry regiment, the Rough Riders. Also risk was a future President and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, William Howard Taft, as well as the reputation of one of the country's most popular Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt.     But there is also a mystery here. The real story of what happened would remain buried for more than another century. Why? Was there a deliberate, and successful, cover up? If the real facts had come to light sooner, would it have mattered? Could it have impacted the course of American history? Is there a lesson to take away here, or at least a warning?     HONOR FOR THE FLAG is based on path finding research into the original files, which was first published in 2007 my book MOROLAND; but it is much broader in scope and not only narrates a reliable account of the battle itself but how it rapidly evolved into a contentious and divisive debate over the moral basis of American intervention in foreign lands.     200 pages, including 72 photographs and illustrations. To see reviews and purchase, click on the web links below:         Moroland is the lost history of the once-famed struggle between the United States Army and the "wild" Moros, the Muslims of the southern Philippine islands. Lasting over two decades, it was this country's first sustained encounter with a volatile mixture of nation building, insurgency, counterinsurgency, and militant Islamism.     An unanticipated byproduct of the Spanish-American War, the task of subduing and then "civilizing" the "Land of the Moros" was delegated to the U.S. Army. Working through the traditional ruling hierarchy and respecting an ancient system of laws based on the Qur'an, Moro Province became an autonomous, military-governed Islamic colony within a much larger, overwhelmingly Christian territory, the Philippine Islands.     An initially successful occupation, it transitioned to a grand experiment: an audacious plan to transform and remake Moro society, values, and culture in an American image; placing the Moros on an uncertain and ill-defined path towards inclusion in an eventual Western-style democracy. But the Moros reacted with obstinate and unyielding resistance to what they perceived as a deliberate attack on the religion of Islam and a way of life ordained by God. This ignited a constant stream of battles and expeditions known in U.S. Army history as the Moro Campaigns and lasting more than a decade. In violence and ferocity they may have equaled, if not surpassed, the more famous late-19th Century Indian Wars of the Great Plains. It also led to the creation of the fabled Moro Constabulary, small contingents of native troops led by American, European, and Filipino officers.     The backdrop is a bustling, raucous, newly-prosperous nation finding its way as a world and imperial power. But with this new-found status came a near-religious belief that the active spread of America's institutions, values, and form of government, even when achieved through coercion or force, would create a better world. A subtext is a deep and bitter rivalry between two of its most prominent players, Captain John J. Pershing and General Leonard Wood, born only one month apart, each championing markedly opposed military philosophies. Eventually they would compete to lead one-million American "doughboys" into the cauldron of the world's first Great War.     Few Americans are aware that a century later the U.S. military has quietly returned to Moroland, to battle "radical Islamist terrorism"; … [Read more...]

WW2: Liberation That Destroyed: The End of Manila, Queen of the Pacific By HECHO AYER:

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Liberation That Destroyed: The End of Manila, Queen of the Pacific   By HECHO AYER: https://hechoayer.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/liberation-that-destroyed-the-end-of-manila-queen-of-the-pacific/ An Insult to Religious Filipinos' Sensibilities: Nuns Being Rounded Up by Japanese Soldiers (http://img51.imageshack.us/i/image005wn.jpg/) With no applause, but with artillery fire, American bombs, Japanese lust and death, Manila, Queen of the Pacific, made her inglorious bow to the world in February 1945. Iconic Photo of an American Tank Forcing Its Entry Into For Santiago, Once Impenetrable (AHC) In a single month, what was built for centuries to being Asia’s first and genuine melting pot was destroyed and forever erased from the world. The capital city of the Philippines became the stage for not only bodily massacre but also, spiritual, cultural, artistic and national eradication. It was in 9 January 1945 when Lt. Gen. Walter Krueger arrived in Lingayen Gulf, Pangasinan in what would become a United States campaign to recapture the Philippines from Japanese claws. By the end of January, much progress has been made by the Americans in reaching the outskirts of Manila namely that of Tagaytay and Nasugbu. They began to make their way up north to Manila. American Tank Inspects Intramuros' Ruins. Notice the Walls of Sto. Domingo (AHC) Backside of Once Marvelous Sto. Domingo Church (AHC) The Manila Post Office (Where my Great Grandfather was Post Master General Before the War) (AHC) On the other hand, the Commander-in-Chief of the Japanese mission to the Philippines, General Yamashita, has moved his headquarters to Baguio. He gave specific orders to make Manila an “Open City” and to simply destroy bridges and other critical infrastructures that may aid the Americans. He had no intention, whatsoever, of keeping Manila. However, Rear Admiral Iwabuchi Sanji disobeyed the orders of his superior and launched a bloody and diabolical campaign to “defend” Manila to the end. With his motley group of Japanese soldiers, a month of suffering and sheer darkness engulfed the city of Manila, victimizing its citizens, its art, its culture, its heritage, its very soul. The Intact Facade of San Francisco Could Have Still Been Restored (AHC) When the Americans were making much advances into the city, the Japanese blew up Manila’s very historic and beautiful bridges, thus virtually dividing Manila into two: the Northern and Southern banks. In the eastern suburbs outside Manila, like Cubao, Kamuning and San Juan, the resistance against the Americans was minimal. My own lola and her two sisters and their mama moved to Cubao during this time precisely because they had a bad feeling of what would happen to Manila during those tense days. All girls, they were luckily spared. They were said to have only witnessed one violent act: the neighbor peeked while the Japanese were making the rounds when suddenly, he was shot in the head by a Jap who saw him. Survivors of Intramuros Try to Escape The Place By Crossing the Pasig (AHC) The National Assembly (AHC) Likewise, although not without giving a good fight, the Japanese were unable to hold on to the northern banks of the Pasig. The areas here were the districts of Binondo, Sta. Cruz, Quiapo, etc. In 3 February 1945, the US infantry, led by Atenean Manuel Colayco, managed to reach the Allied Internment camp that was actually the University of Santo Tomas’ sprawling campus. Its main building became the prison for around five thousand foreigners and Filipinos. The interment camp was captured the following day. UST Concentration Camp's Liberation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Santo_Tomas_Internment_Camp_Liberation_.jpg) The situation, however, at the southern banks of the Pasig was far different. What is considered Manila’s most heavily concentrated area of rich architectural masterpieces, from ancient Spanish intramuros, to the American’s Neo-Classical corridor, as well as genteel Ermita, this area of Manila became the hiding place of the losing Japanese soldiers who became insanely cruel, killing people with no mercy. The Navy Club on Fire, While Letran Being Heavily Attacked by the Americans Since There Were Japanese Hiding Inside (AHC) According to the eminent Dr. Fernando N. Zialcita, my own professor in cultural heritage studies, the remaining soldiers in Manila, a good 10,000 marines, proceeded what would become infamously known as the “Manila Massacre”. Every morning, the soldiers would get heavily drunk before the roamed the city to kill civilians found in the streets. They began to set beautiful Filipino homes on fire (Ermita, Singalong and Malate became the worst hit residential areas), raid schools, kill orphans and even the mentally challenged. Legislative Building Ruins (AHC) Refuge in a Church (from LIFE Magazine) Suddenly, Manila … [Read more...]

The Americans destroyed Manila in 1945 by Ricardo C. Morales, Rappler News

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The Americans destroyed Manila in 1945 By Ricardo C. Morales Courtesy of: http://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/iq/82850-americans-destroyed-manila-1945 If the carnage of Manila in 1945 did not happen, we would have had a very different Philippines today. Our momentum ran out and the other nations in Asia eventually surpassed it. DESTROYED. Photo shows the destruction at Intramuros after the Battle of Manila. Photo from the US Army/Wikimedia Commons MANILA, Philippines – It was mainly the United States' casualty-avoidance policy that resulted in unrestrained and indiscriminate application of overwhelming firepower by forces under MacArthur, which caused the utter devastation of Manila and the loss of 100,000 Filipino lives in 1945. The Japanese forces, certainly capable of unequalled brutality and barbarism themselves, also contributed to the outcome, but could not have inflicted the same level of deaths and destruction. This cataclysmic event was a turning point in the development of Filipino society and its effects are more evident today, 70 years after. The figure of 100,000 civilian deaths is a conservative estimate. Some sources cite as high as 240,000. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki onlykilled 70,000 and 40,000, respectively. The firebombing of Dresden killed 25,000. Only the the rape of Nanking in 1937, where Japanese troops murdered 300,000 civilians, eclipses the destruction of Manila which some historians call one of the tragedies of WW2. The immediate U S objectives in Luzon in early 1945 was to rescue the POWs in Cabanatuan and the internees at the University of Santo Tomas. Once these were achieved, the Americans turned their attention to Manila and this time, it appeared, avoiding civilian casualties was no longer a concern. In the liberation of the internees, the Japanese custodial force of 150 were allowed to leave under a flag of truce. That was the only time the Americans attempted to negotiate with the enemy. Not that it would have been easy. The city of one million inhabitants was defended by a fanatical, death-seeking naval officer who had his previous command torpedoed under him in the Guadalcanal campaign. He was, quite literally, dying for payback. WEAPON. The US Army 240mm howitzer was used in action during the battle of Manila. Photo from Wikimedia Commons Armando Ang, in The Brutal Holocaust writes: "According to reliable evidence gathered from prisoners of war, military personnel, Philippine officials and civilians, and Japanese documents, the rape of Manila was not a random act of melee, mayhem and wanton destruction but an act of coldly planned atrocities by the Japanese high command from Tokyo." Even if this were true, it would have been physically impossible to carry out. The Japanese forces in Manila numbered 17,000. Approaching the city from north and south were 35,000 US troops supported by a few thousand Filipino guerillas. Knowing the impending battle they faced, the Japanese would have been intent on saving precious ammunition. Relentless attack Manual methods of execution like beheading, bayonetting and mass incineration were slow and inefficient. The battle took a month – from February 3 to March 3, 1945. Unlike in Nanking (which took place over 6 weeks) where the 50,000 Japanese troops had complete control of the city, in Manila they were under relentless attack by U S troops and Filipino guerillas. Parsons (2008) writes that “The Yanks were using portable howitzers, whereas the Japanese were using bigger guns from all land-based compass points around the city.” This is not accurate. The Americans had bigger guns and more of it. Portable, yes, but also much bigger. They trundled up their behemoth 240 mm howitzers, “the most powerful weapon deployed by US field artillery units during World War II,” versus the heaviest Japanese field piece ever deployed, the 150 mm Type 38, a 1905 design manufactured under license from Krupp. The latter were used in 1942 in the Bataan campaign but there is no record of their use in Manila. Furthermore, to deploy artillery pieces from “all points around the city” pointing inwards would render these guns vulnerable to piece-meal attacks by guerillas or US forces and such an artillery deployment would have been difficult to direct and control. One statistic that blunts the argument of Japanese responsibility is the low number of US deaths. In the Battle of Manila, “.. which culminated in a terrible bloodbath and total devastation of the city… was the scene of the worst urban fighting in the Pacific theater,” the Americans suffered their lowest casualty ratio ever – 1,010 killed out of a total force of 35,000, or less than 3%. Parsons argues further that the high casualty figures could have been part of a deliberate pre-negotiation ploy by the Japanese to discourage an American invasion of Japan, “that … [Read more...]

1945: The Rape of Manila By: Joan Orendain, Philippine Daily Inquirer

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1945: The Rape of Manila By: Joan Orendain, Philippine Daily Inquirer Courtesy of: http://globalnation.inquirer.net/99054/february-1945-the-rape-of-manila DEAD bodies could not be buried as relatives fled the carnage. Photo courtesy of Albert Montilla To this day, much is heard of the Rape of Nanking when the rampaging Japanese Imperial Army killed 300,000 from 1937 to 1938, and raped 20,000 women in that Chinese capital. Pitifully few, though, in the Philippines and even fewer elsewhere, know that in Manila, in February 1945, World War II at its agonizing climax brought forth 100,000 burned, bayoneted, bombed, shelled and shrapneled dead in the span of 28 days.  Unborn babies ripped from their mothers’ wombs provided sport: thrown up in the air and caught, impaled on bayonet tips. With rape on the streets and everywhere else, the Bayview Hotel became Manila’s rape center.  After the dirty deed was done, nipples were sliced off, and bodies bayoneted open from the neck down. William Manchester in his book “American Caesar,” wrote that “Once Rear Adm. Sanji Iwabuchi had decided to defend Manila, the atrocities began, and the longer the battle raged,  the more the Japanese command structure deteriorated, until the uniforms of Nipponese sailors and marines were saturated with Filipino blood. “The devastation of Manila was one of the great tragedies of World War II.  Seventy percent of the utilities, 72 percent of the factories, 80 percent of the southern residential district, and 100 percent of the business district were razed…Hospitals were set afire after their patients had been strapped to their beds.  The corpses of males were mutilated, females of all ages were raped before they were slain, and babies’ eyeballs gouged out and smeared on walls like jelly.” From ‘Pearl’ to rubble The envy of other Far Eastern cities before the war, lovely Manila, a melting pot of four cultures and the acknowledged Pearl of the Orient, turned completely to rubble and smoldering ash, wrack and ruin in the 28 days it gasped its last.  Its face changed forever, national as well as city administrators since then have barely seen to its proper post-war urban planning and reconstruction, with the exception of a few government buildings rebuilt to their original states. (Zoning laws? What’s that?) In dramatic foreshadowing, the Irish Columban priests at Malate Church got a taste of what was to come.  An unknown volunteer worker at the Remedios Hospital wrote that on Dec. 22, 1944, “most beloved” Father Patrick Kelly and Father John Lalor, were taken away by enemy soldiers. On Christmas, Dec. 25, 1944, the priests offered dinner for 200 poor folks.  “We had to put up a brave front with smiles on our faces and lead in our heart.”  The missing priests returned to Malate on Dec. 29 to great rejoicing, but they never talked about what strife they had undergone. A timeline of bloody events as they unfolded helps to remind us that war is hell, through which Manila agonized. Feb. 1, 1945: “Roll out the barrel, Santa Clause is coming,” is the note wrapped in goggles dropped by a plane to starving Allied countries’ civilians interned at the University of Santo Tomas (UST). Feb. 3: American troops arriving from Lingayen liberate the 3,700 interns at UST. Japanese troops commence burning buildings and homes north of Pasig River. Feb. 4: Japanese marines commanded by Rear Adm. Sanji Iwabuchi retreat to Intramuros, blowing up all the bridges across the Pasig. Feb. 9: Ermita and Malate are put to the torch.  Nicanor Reyes’ living room is piled high with furniture and drapes; gasoline is poured over them.  The founder of Far Eastern University and some members of the family burn there after being bayoneted, but young daughter Lourdes who has hidden in a closet, and her wounded mother and aunt, flee to Leveriza to join her grandmother.  Against a wall, the four set up a makeshift shelter with burned GI sheets.  In the shelling, Lourdes’ mother who is shielding her, and her aunt, and grandmother, are killed. Sen. Elpidio Quirino’s wife and two daughters, fleeing to his mother-in-law’s home, are felled by Japanese machine guns. THE BATTLE of Manila left the city in total devastation and killed 100,000 Filipino civilians. Photo courtesy of Albert Montilla Jesus Cabarrus Jr. has shrapnel embedded in his skull to constantly remind him of the terror-filled days in Ermita.  Ordered by enemy troops to converge at nearby Plaza Ferguson, the men are separated from the women and children, and brought to Manila Hotel (where Jesus Sr. and other men become water boys, and where he saw Walter Loving, the Constabulary Band chief, stabbed to death). Hotel turns into hell Wives and children are ordered to Bayview Hotel where the only water is out of toilet water tanks, and females are wantonly raped.  Amid screaming when the building … [Read more...]

Media: El Guro Dino Flores impartirá seminario de Lameco Eskrima

http://esdiario.com.mx/el-guro-dino-flores-impartira-seminario-de-lameco-eskrima/   El Guro Dino Flores impartirá seminario de Lameco Eskrima jul 31, 2015 - 3:04 am  Deportes Comentarios desactivados La Academia EFA que dirige el profesor Adán Castillejos se prepara para recibir una visita de lujo, pues el Guro Dino Flores estará impartiendo sus conocimientos en un seminario de Lameco Eskrima –Kali Ilusitrisimo-, el cual se desarrollará este próximo 14 y 15 de agosto. Lo anterior fue confirmado por el profesor Adán Castillejos Gallegos quién destacó que este seminario busca la preparación de sus alumnos, por lo que es de suma importancia continuar trabajando en las artes marciales. Indicó que el Guro Dino Flores nació en Hawai. Ha vivido en varios lugares, incluyendo Fiji, Papua Nueva Guinea, Australia, así como Manila y Laguna – Filipinas. Guro Dino se introdujo primero en el concepto de historia “Arnis” y Filipinas Guerrero por su padre el Dr. AS Flores a mediados de 1970. Esto se hizo a través de la tradición oral, Pilipino Komiks y difícil de encontrar publicaciones durante la Ley Marcial. Su primer contacto con el entrenamiento físico fue en la década de 1980 en la provincia de Laguna, Filipinas. Familiares mayores y vecinos de la familia tierras ancestrales de muchas generaciones, lo presentaron en las sesiones de traspatio a aplicaciones básicas de la calle y la estrategia de la hoja balisong durante las estancias en las Filipinas. Muchos de estos primeros instructores habían experimentado situaciones de hoja real con las cicatrices para probarlo. Las primeras lecciones fueron evitación, la conciencia ambiental y el comportamiento adecuado para evitar el conflicto. Dino entrenó durante varios años con el Gran Maestro Conrado A. Manaois en Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis y Master Henry Bio en Sikaran Arnis en la década de 1980, junto con sus primos Ariel Flores Musgos y Choy Flores. A principios de 1990 fue aceptado como miembro inicial de Punong Guro Edgar Sulites ‘nueva formación Backyard Grupo AKA el Oriehenal Grupo Sulite. Durante el entrenamiento constante en el patio trasero que pasó de ser un boxeador agresivo a uno que ahora más tranquilo y preciso. Su estilo de lucha en los primeros días del Grupo de los Backyard le valió el apodo de “Aso’ng Gulo” de sus compañeros de los compañeros y era considerado combatiente patio trasero favorito Punong Guro Sulites ‘debido a la clara el uso del plan de estudios durante los combates. Además, tuvo la buena fortuna de experimentar el entrenamiento en Kali Ilustrísimo con Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Guro Arnold Narzo, Guro Peachie Baron, Maestro Rey Galang, Maestro Yuli Romo y Master de Tony Diego. También entrenó en Kali Ilustrísimo con uno de sus compañeros de entrenamiento y miembro Lameco Backyard Guro Hans Tan, que fue certificado para enseñar Kali Ilustrsimo con el Maestro, Tony Diego en 1999. Además Guro Dino entrenado en privado durante varios años en California y las Filipinas con el profesor Ireneo L. Olavides en Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino también cita la importancia de sus compañeros de entrenamiento en Lameco SOG y Kapisanang Mandirigma en su crecimiento. Dino ha impartido numerosos seminarios y clases en los últimos años. Ha aparecido en la televisión, videos instructivos, Cine Independiente y programas de radio promoción de las artes. Ha contribuido al artículo de la revista para publicaciones como “Budo International”, “Maestros”, “Blitz” “FMA informativo” y “FMA Digest. Guro Dino es un miembro fundador de Kapisanang Mandirigma de: Organización de Investigación Mandirigma / Mandirigma.org, Kali Klub sa Filipinotown histórico de Los Ángeles y la Organización Backyard Eskrima ™. El Kali Klub es una colaboración voluntaria con varias agencias sin fines de lucro en Los Ángeles. El proyecto incluye la creación de un programa premiado desviar positivamente la juventud en riesgo de las drogas y las pandillas que usan los filipinos Guerrero Artes como una metáfora para la adaptación y el aprendizaje. Cientos de estudiantes experimentaron el programa a lo largo de diez años. Para algunos estudiantes de la educación salvó literalmente su vida en varias situaciones callejeras armadas. Algunos de los premios y reconocimientos de para el programa provienen de organizaciones como en Buscar para Involucrar Pilipino estadounidenses, la Asamblea Estatal de California y el Ayuntamiento de Los Ángeles. … [Read more...]

TV: Guro Ariel Flores Mosses of Mandirigma.org/Kapisanang Mandirigma with Sensei Hamm of Ten Tigers on Las Vegas TV

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Guro Ariel Flores Mosses of Mandirigma.org/Kapisanang Mandirigma with Sensei Hamm of Ten Tigers on Las Vegas TV promoting Self-Defense Seminar including Filipino Martial Arts. A self-defense seminar for women is being offered this weekend for a donation to AFAN of $20. Read more: http://www.fox5vegas.com/Clip/12133192/self-defense-seminar-for-women-being-offered#ixzz3yo7O1jKi   http://www.combatfma.com/ http://www.tentigersmartialarts.com/index.html   … [Read more...]

Seminar: Seminar: Guro Brandon Ricketts to teach Kali Ilustrisimo in San Diego, California. October 2015.

Brandon

 Guro Brandon Ricketts to teach Kali Ilustrisimo in San Diego, California. October 2015.   … [Read more...]

Budo Magazine Publishes the final Interview of Grandmaster Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo. Interview by Tim Fredianell. September 2015.

GM Tony Diego

  Budo Magazine Publishes the final Interview of Grandmaster Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo. Interview by  Tim Fredianell.   Read interview in English here: http://issuu.com/budoweb/docs/martial_arts_magazine_budo_internat_f897c9abdb5660 Read interview in Spanish here: http://issuu.com/budoweb/docs/revista_artes_marciales_cinturon_ne_86c3fa97b13e16?e=1589527%2F30101651       … [Read more...]

Heart Bypass Fundraiser for Grandmaster Alexander Co

MAster Alex Co

Heart Bypass Fundraiser for Grandmaster Alexander Co Donate Here: https://www.gofundme.com/tp3wnp9c Alex Co is synonymous with martial arts in the Philippines. He is grandmaster of Ngo Cho and Tang Lang, owner of the beloved Squadron Shop, publisher of books and magazines, and supporter of all teachers and styles. Master Co has done so much for so many, never asking for anything in return. His life has been filled with friends and masters and robust health and financial stability. He has been my mentor for over 20 years. Now, he is sick, he is poor, he is weak, and his life is touch and go each month. Master Co suffers from multiple morbidities: Heart Disease, Diabetes, Low Blood Pressure, and Kidney Failure. He can no longer urinate. He has had several surgeries in the past few years. Stents in his heart, stents in his legs, and he is in dialysis 5 hours a day, 4 days per week. He recently almost had his legs amputated. The thing is, Master Co could have a kidney transplant, except his heart it too weak. It is only at 25% function. But he cannot afford the heart bypass to make him strong enough for the kidney transplant. He has spent all his retirement on temporary procedures to keep him alive. But now the doctors told him he has a 50% chance of suffering heart attack each time he is connected to the dialiysis machine. And they have recommended another heart stent. He cannot afford it. So now, the most generous and knowledgeable teacher in Manila, who has been mentor to many and financial supporter of many passed masters, like Tatang Ilustrisimo, Edgar Sulite and more... is at the threshold of life and death. One day feels ok and the next he is flattened and swollen and unable to breath and in need of more temporary surgeries. Those who know and love Master Co, who is only in his mid-60s, do not want this legend to pass from this earth, We ask for your help. He needs your support. A few dollars, a hundred dollars... whatever donation you can manage.  If we can raise enough for the heart bypass, the docs say he will be strong enough for the kidney transplant, and perhaps live another 15 years. If we can't do it in time, there may be no more time. Please help, as you can. Please. Donate Here: https://www.gofundme.com/tp3wnp9c   A word from Mandirigma.org Grandmaster Alex Co is a longtime practitioner of the Philippine Warrior Arts. He is also a member of Bakbakan International and has published several book on the subject, most notably the books on Lameco Eskrima by Punong Guro Edgar Sulite. Grandmaster Alex is a living Martial Arts treasure of the Philippines. … [Read more...]

Seminar: Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach Lameco Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo in Washington State. September 2015.

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Seminar: Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach Lameco Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo in Washington State. September 2015.     … [Read more...]

Seminar: Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, August 6th, 2015

Lameco Ilustrisimo

Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, August 6th, 2015   … [Read more...]

SEMINARIO DE LAMECO ESKRIMA Y KALI ILUSTRISIMO CON GURO DINO FLORES EN TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, CHIAPAS. 14 Y 15 DE AGOSTO

Mexico Lameco Ilusrisimo

SEMINARIO DE LAMECO ESKRIMA Y KALI ILUSTRISIMO CON GURO DINO FLORES EN TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, CHIAPAS. 14 Y 15 DE AGOSTO   … [Read more...]

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This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password: … [Read more...]

Seminar: Don’t Bring a Gun to a Knife Fight! with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses. Green Valley Range indoor shooting range in Las Vegas, Nevada. July 18th, 2015.

Ariel Seminar

    Coming this Summer...   Seminar: Don't Bring a Gun to a Knife Fight! with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses.  Green Valley Range indoor shooting range in Las Vegas, Nevada. July 18th, 2015. Sometimes you don't have the option to draw and fire on an attacker, so you have to put on your Jason Bourne goggles. Start to see common household items as lethal weapons. Learn to defend yourself with a magazines, pens, Swiffers®, a wooden leg...whatever happens to be within your grasp when danger strikes! Don't Bring a Gun to a Knife Fight! is a 2-hour close-quarters defense class that will have you honing your instincts, boosting your confidence and upping your hand even without drawing your gun. With Master Ariel F. Mosses of CombatFMA as your guide, you will apply the old adage "Necessity is the Mother of jamming a rolled up Newsweek into an No-Goodnik's eye," and discover some new truths of your own by wielding objects both blunt and pointy. Yes, this Saturday, July 18th, you can learn to fight like Jason Bourne. Go check out his pen fight and his magazine fight scenes on Youtube [too graphic for a link here], and then get over and Register Now . Spaces are limited! See you still standing when the smoke clears! Copyright © 2015 Green Valley Range, All rights reserved. Green Valley Range indoor shooting range in Las Vegas, Nevada Our mailing address is: Green Valley Range 175 Cassia Way, Henderson, NV Henderson, NV 89014   More info @ http://combatfma.com/special-events.html   More about Guro Ariel at: http://combatfma.com/about-ariel-f.-mosses.html … [Read more...]

Seminar: Guro Brandon Ricketts at Glendale FMA / Aranda – Ricketts Memorial Gym. July 12, 2015.

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Guro Brandon Ricketts Seminar at Glendale FMA / Aranda - Ricketts Memorial Gym. On July 12 2015 Guro Brandon Ricketts conducted a seminar at Glendale FMA / Aranda - Ricketts Memorial Gym. The Event was hosted by Guro Bud Balani and Guro Dino Flores of the Los Angeles chapters of Lameco SOG, Kali Ilustrisimo and Kapisanang Mandirigma. Attendees came from all over California from places such as San Diego, Santa Barbara, Stockton and San Francisco. Guro Brandon was also supported by some of his students from the USA Headquarters of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Brandon Ricketts focused of the fundemental core techniques and how they relate to real time sparring. A concept his father the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts drilled into his dedicated students. The seminar concluded with the participant doing some light sparring to test some of the techniques they had just learned in real time. All the participants had a great time with this truly hands on approach to the art. Guro Brandon is leaving for the Philippines at the end of the year. One of his objectives is to take partial administrative charge of his fathers Bakbakan Legacy and bring it into the next generation. The Los Angeles chapters of Lameco SOG, Kali Ilustrisimo and Kapisanang Mandirigma will try to host Guro Brandon Ricketts again for another seminar before he leaves. Check the www.mandirigma.org website for updates. About Guro Brandon Ricketts In 2011 Guro Bruce Ricketts was formally selected as the new Chief Instructor of Master Christopher Ricketts Ilustrisimo Organization and Bakbakan Philippines. The official ceremony was held  in Manila, Philippines. During the same ceremony Guro Brandon Ricketts was promoted to the the position as Second in Command to Guro Bruce Ricketts. Also selected was the Administrative Board which includes Guro Ronnie Ricketts, Guro Alex Ricketts and Guro Jason Ricketts. The organization is dedicated to maintaining the legacy of Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts. The Advisory Board was also selected. Guro Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts trained under their Father, Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts since they could walk. The training room in their Philippine home was located in front of their bedroom. Daily exposure to the arts was the norm. Besides daily training with their Father and other students, many masters spent time training in their home. To name a few, legends such as Master Roland Dantes, Master Rey Galang, Master Yuli Romo, Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, Master Tony Diego and none other than Grandmaster Ilustrisimo himself would train there. The technical and fighting skill of these young Guro’s clearly reflect their esteemed lineage. Guro Bruce and Guro Brandon are also accomplished practitioners of Bakbakan Sagasa Kickboxing, Ngo Cho Kun, Jiu-Jitsu and Boxing.   Event Flyer Aranda - Ricketts / Glendale FMA Gym Banner         Lameco SOG Members with Guro Brandon. Guro Bud Balani, Guro Dino and Guro Bryan Emerson with his son.   Events Hosts with Guro Brandon. Guro Dino, GM Joe Tan, Guro Johnathan Balani, Guro Bud Balani.   Guro Brandon giving pointers.   Sparring! Sparring!     Sparring! Group photo with some of the participants.   Sparring!   Guro Brandon giving pointers   Participants in action.   Participants in action.   Guro Brandon giving pointers.   Guro Johnathan giving pointers.   Contact drilling. Contact drilling. … [Read more...]

Eskrima Documentary Series Teaser Trailer: Ang Dangal ng Lahi (Pride)

Eskrima Documentary

Eskrima Documentary Series - Teaser Trailer: Ang Dangal Ng Lahi (Pride) Ang Dangal ng Lahi (Pride) is a series of short documentaries about the Warrior Arts of the Philippines commonly known as Eskrima, Arnis and Kali. The focus will be arts and organizations of Bakbakan Philippines, Ilustrisimo and Lameco Eskrima. Director: Tim Fredianelli General Consultant: Dino Flores Distribution: Mandirigma.org Kapisanang Mandirigma Productions Release Date: 2015 For more information go to: http://mandirigma.org/?p=2651 https://vimeo.com/mandirigma/eskrimadors © 2015 Kapisanang Mandirigma Productions, All Rights Reserved.   … [Read more...]

Kali Ilustrisimo Seminar with Guro Brandon Ricketts, July 12, 2015. Glendale FMA, California.

Brandon Seminar 5 flat

Kali Ilustrisimo Seminar with Guro Brandon Ricketts, July 12, 2015. Glendale FMA, California.       A rare opportunity to train with Guro Brandon Ricketts. Guro Brandon grew up with the art and will give you insight into the transition from being a theory based drill practitioner to a real time functional based Eskrimador. Guro Brandon will only be in the USA till the end of 2015 - so don't miss your chance to train with one of the heirs of Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts Ilustrisimo lineage. 10Am to 2PM $50.00 prepaid by friday, July 10th. Spectators $40.00 prepaid. $70.00 at the door.  Spectators $60 at the door. Contact: mandirigma.org@gmail.com More info at: http://mandirigma.org/?p=2783 http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=1613 This seminar is open to the general public. No Video Please. No Photography without permission. Brought to you by The Warrior Arts of the Philippines Alliance - Kali Ilustrisimo, Bakbakan Philippines, Lameco SOG, Eskrima, Kapisanang Mandirigma, Combat FMA Las Vegas.   -------------------------   In 2011 Guro Bruce Ricketts was formally selected as the new Chief Instructor of Master Christopher Ricketts Ilustrisimo Organization and Bakbakan Philippines. The official ceremony was held  in Manila, Philippines. During the same ceremony Guro Brandon Ricketts was promoted to the the position as Second in Command to Guro Bruce Ricketts. Also selected was the Administrative Board which includes Guro Ronnie Ricketts, Guro Alex Ricketts and Guro Jason Ricketts. The organization is dedicated to maintaining the legacy of Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts. The Advisory Board was also selected. Guro Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts trained under their Father, Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts since they could walk. The training room in their Philippine home was located in front of their bedroom. Daily exposure to the arts was the norm. Besides daily training with their Father and other students, many masters spent time training in their home. To name a few, legends such as Master Roland Dantes, Master Rey Galang, Master Yuli Romo, Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, Master Tony Diego and none other than Grandmaster Ilustrisimo himself would train there. The technical and fighting skill of these young Guro’s clearly reflect their esteemed lineage. Guro Bruce and Guro Brandon are also accomplished practitioners of Bakbakan Sagasa Kickboxing, Ngo Cho Kun, Jiu-Jitsu and Boxing. … [Read more...]

Seminar: Viñas Arnis at Glendale FMA, California.

Kali arnis eskrima vinas1

Warrior Arts of the Philippines Alliance Presents for the first time ever in California   Viñas Arnis Seminar     " GM Nonong has been actively Instructing , propagating and spreading this Legacy FMA art founded by his late father GM Jose Vinas. He is here for a short visit and practitioners irregardless of styles are encouraged to attend this rare workshop and experience the different approach with regards to bolo and knifefighting." Master Joe Valencia Tan Certified Master Instructor Lapu Lapu Vinas Arnis Afficionado Certified Master Instructor Modified Tapado   Viñas Arnis is a complete and original, bladed weapon and empty hand, Filipino Martial Arts system founded in Bacolod City, Philippines in 1932. Lapu Lapu Viñas Arnis Affecionados Assoc. is the oldest documented Filipino Martial Arts system in Negros Occidental, Philippines It was founded in 1932 by the late Grandmaster Jose L. Viñas. The first inheritor of the system is none other than Grandmaster Jose L. Viñas son, Professor Wilson E. "Nonong" Viñas. This system appeared in Punong Guro Sulite’s landmark book “Masters of Kali, Arnis and Eskrima”.   Seminar presented by Master Joe Tan, Kapisanang Mandirigma and the Warrior Arts of the Philipines Alliance. This is an extremely rare opportunity as this was originally going to be invitation only. Don’t miss out!   Date: July 19, 2015 (Sunday) Time: 10AM to 2:00PM. Location: Glendale FMA, California / Aranda - Ricketts Memorial Gym. Donation: $35 Prepaid. $50 at the door. Spectators - $25. Please bring your own training gear. No video. No photos without permission.   Contact: Master Joe Tan - comfortwear@roadrunner.com Guro Bud Balani - bbalanigrip@gmail.com Guro Dino Flores - mandirigma.org@gmail.com For further details go to: http://mandirigma.org/?p=2808   The late Grandmaster Jose L. Viñas.   The late Grandmaster Jose L. Viñas.   Copyright © 2015 Kapisanang Mandirigma. All images, content and layout except those of those by owner. … [Read more...]

Master Christopher Ricketts and Bakbakan Philippines doing Ilustrisimo on TV Show – 2005.

Master Christopher Ricketts on TV

Master Christopher Ricketts and Bakbakan Philippines doing Ilustrisimo on TV Show. Master Ricketts is assisted by Bruce Ricketts, Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Miguel Zubiri, Doran Sordo, Brandon Ricketts, Monsour del Rosario and other members of Bakbakan Philippines. Shot at Olympians Taekwondo Training Center (OTTC) in Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines. 2005.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZFL1s9N7e4&feature=youtu.be   … [Read more...]

Los Angeles City Hall Celebrate 117th Philippine Independence Day/Araw ng Kalayaan.

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Los Angeles City Hall Celebrate 117th Philippine Independence Day/Araw ng Kalayaan with Kapisanang Mandirigma/Mandirigma.org. June 12th, 2015. Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles City Hall to celebrated the 117th Philippine Independence Day or Araw ng Kalayaan. The event was organizes by the Los Angeles Association of City Employees. Kapisanang Mandirigma/Mandirigma.org demonstrated a sample of the Warrior Arts of the Philippines at the event. In particular the Arts of Lameco Eskrima and Kali Ilustrisimo. This is the second time Kapisanang Mandirigma has appeared at L.A. City Hall. The last time was for the official dedication of L.A. Historic Filipinotown in 2002. The first official Filipinotown in the country. Guro Bud Balani and Guro Dino Flores was assisted by Guro Johnathan Balani, Mark Ramos and Daniel Parker. Their performance was after the flag ceremony in the main building forecourt. The Flag c Ceremony consisted of Filipino-American law enforcement officers parading with various flags of the Philippine Revolution. Los Angeles has the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. Mabuhay Ang Pilipinas!   City of Los Angeles official dedication to the celebration. The demo team with Master Joe Tan of Modified Tapados/Vinias Eskrima Systems. Guro Bud Balani, Dr. A.S. Flores, Guro Dino Flores Demo Team in action headed by Guro Johnathan Balani.   Event program. Guro Dino and Guro Johnathan demonstrating single sword techniques as Guro Bud narrates.   Filipino-American Law Enforcement Officers parading various flags of the Philippine Revolution.   The Eskrima Demo team.   Guro Bud Balani and Guro Dino Flores.   Filipino-American Law Enforcement Officers parading various flags of the Philippine Revolution.   Los Angeles City Hall and L.A. Sister Cities.     Photos property of Mandirigma.org. Photographer Dr. A.S. Flores. … [Read more...]

Never Subdued Paperback by W. Franklin Hook (Author) – A true about the Philippine-American War 1898-1902

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Never Subdued Paperback by W. Franklin Hook (Author) A true story about the Philippine-American War 1898-1902 and how it led to the Moro Campaigns against radical Islam 1902-1913 "[Never Subdued is] a tale of what it was like for a large number of young American men when they "went soljering" more than a century ago, in the steamy tropics of the Philippine Islands during the opening years of the 20th Century. What may surprise you is how uncannily alike "soljering" was then to that of their spiritual military heirs (perhaps including a few of their great and even great-great grandsons or granddaughters) in the cold mountain fastnesses of Afghanistan in the early 21st Century." "[The narrative conveys] the image of a bunch of ordinary young men who got caught up in the historical moment of America's first wars of the 20th Century, enlisted almost on a whim, and took part in an extraordinary adventure. It is as much a human story as a history lesson . . . It relates entirely to the present day." -Robert A. Fulton is the author of Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920   Editorial Review From Kirkus Reviews A history of a century-old war with frightening relevance to today's counterinsurgency campaigns.Islamic extremists, guerilla warfare, mountain firefights--Americans are painfully familiar with these things from the recent conflict in Afghanistan. But as Hook notes, the U.S. military faced similar challenges in the Philippines following the Spanish-American War. A retired doctor and reserve Army colonel, Hook spent a decade researching the Philippine-American War and the Moro Campaigns. After Spain ceded the islands to the U.S., American soldiers found themselves battling native Filipinos who previously were glad to see them. Emilio Aguinaldo and his revolutionaries wanted independence from foreign rule, but U.S. policymakers had other ideas. Drawing on soldier diaries, newspaper accounts and other sources, Hook presents a boots-on-the-ground narrative of the bloody insurgency that followed. American soldiers fought the elusive Filipinos while suffering under intense heat, relentless mosquitoes and rampant disease. Careful to note discrepancies and biases in his sources, Hook constructs a timeline that captures the tension as events teeter out of control. He also tries to explain the thinking on both sides, showing how policy blunders, duplicity and prejudice may have exacerbated the hostilities. A peace proclamation in 1902 officially ended the insurgency, but the U.S. still faced the problem of controlling the southern islands, which were predominantly Muslim. Combat with Moro fundamentalists featured brutalities similar to those seen in today's asymmetrical conflicts--hit-and-run attacks, personal jihad and heavy collateral damage on the civilian population. Throughout the book, a cast of colorful characters emerges as politics, war and personal ambition become intertwined. General Leonard Wood's hard-line approach to the Moros seems counterproductive, while John Pershing's more sensitive tactics would not look out of place in a modern Army counterinsurgency manual. Though the book lacks literary flair, it's a balanced look into the fog of war, where allies can become adversaries and the question "What did we accomplish?" is still open for debate.An often-forgotten conflict comes to life in this authentic account of heroism and atrocity, where the difference between rebel and patriot is which side of the line you stand on. … [Read more...]

Book: The Ordeal of Samar. Schott, Joseph L. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1964.

Kali Arnis Eskrima Escrima mandirigma.org mandirigma dino flores

      The Ordeal of Samar. Schott, Joseph L. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1964. Hardcover, 302 pages, b&w photographs, index. A chronicle of the Philippine insurrection against American troops immediately after the Spanish American War, and of the sensational court martial that changed history. “The Balangiga massacre was an incident in 1901 in the town of the same name during the Philippine–American War. It initially referred to the killing of about 48 members of the US 9th Infantry by the townspeople allegedly augmented by guerrillas in the town of Balangiga on Samar Island during an attack on September 28 of that year. In the 1960s Filipino nationalists applied it to the retaliatory measures taken on the island. This incident was described as the United States Army's worst defeat since the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. Filipinos regard the attack as one of their bravest acts in the war.” - Wikipedia … [Read more...]

Rest in Peace Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite on this the 18th year anniversary of your passing, your memory will always be with us.

Punong Guro

Rest in Peace Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite on this the 18th year anniversary of your passing, your memory will always be with us.       Post courtesy of Guro Dave Gould. … [Read more...]

Philippines & Mexico push to nominate Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade Route to World Heritage List

manila-accapulco-galleon-trade-kali arnis eskrima fma

PH, Mexico push to nominate Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade Route to World Heritage List - From the Department of Foreign Affairs Original Article at: http://www.gov.ph/2015/04/28/ph-mexico-push-to-nominate-manila-acapulco-galleon-trade-route-to-world-heritage-list/ An Experts’ Roundtable Meeting was held at the University of Santo Tomas (UST) on April 23 as part of the preparation of the Philippines for the possible transnational nomination of the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade Route to the World Heritage List. The nomination will be made jointly with Mexico. The following are the experts and the topics they discussed during the roundtable meeting: Dr. Celestina Boncan on the Tornaviaje; Dr. Mary Jane A. Bolunia on Shipyards in the Bicol Region; Mr. Sheldon Clyde Jago-on, Bobby Orillaneda, and Ligaya Lacsina on Underwater Archaeology; Dr. Leovino Garcia on Maps and Cartography; Fr. Rene Javellana, S.J. on Fortifications in the Philippines; Felice Sta. Maria on Food; Dr. Fernando Zialcita on Textile; and Regalado Trota Jose on Historical Dimension. The papers presented and discussed during the roundtable meeting will be synthesized into a working document to establish the route’s Outstanding Universal Value.     The Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade bears its remarkable significance for linking four continents and two oceans, contributing to the development of trade in Asia, Europe, North and South America. It paved the way for the widest possible exchange of material goods, cultural traditions and practices, knowledge and belief systems and peoples. For some 250 years, it served as a formidable bridge between East and West. Today, it is considered as an early manifestation of globalization, having influenced the politics, philosophy, commerce, and trade development of almost the entire world. The Galleon Trade firmly put Manila on the world map as the largest trade hub in the Orient with solid historical links to its neighbors. The Route becomes symbolic of UNESCO and the World Heritage Convention’s aims and objectives in establishing peace across nations through shared heritage and a culture of understanding. The roundtable meeting and the nomination of the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade Route to the World Heritage List are initiatives of the UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines and the Department of Foreign Affairs, in partnership with the UST Graduate School – Center for Conservation of Cultural Property and Environment in the Tropics. Following the roundtable discussion of the Philippine experts, a series of meetings will be convened for its launch in the international community. dfa.gov.ph … [Read more...]

Book: HANG THE DOGS: THE TRUE TRAGIC HISTORY OF THE BALANGIGA MASSACRE

escrima kali arnis philippines luzon visayas mindanao FMA eskrimador, dino flores, mandirigma.org

Book Review IN-DEPTH AND INFORMATIVE By Quintin L. Doroquez   Original article at : http://gugma.samarnews.net/articles/article8.htm     HANG THE DOGS: THE TRUE TRAGIC HISTORY OF THE BALANGIGA MASSACRE BOB COUTTIE New Day Publishers Quezon City, Philippines California Distributor: Philippine Expressions Mail Order Bookshop $24.95 (paper, 462 pages) Hang The Dogs: The True Tragic History of the Balangiga Massacre is quite an intriguing title of a serious book. If the book, or any book for that matter on related title, were set in or were about the British Isles, where the author is originally from, it may outright invite distaste on sight from animal lovers of which Britons mostly are. Hang the dogs -- that's quite a harsh “edict”, coming as it does from a third party (the author) if addressed to a particular party or group alone involved. However, Bob Couttie's edict, if we call the title of his book on the Balangiga Incident as such, is an aphorism directed to the party that did something wrong, the party that should make amend. And in the Balangiga Incident both parties -- the Americans and the Filipinos, to varying degrees -- do need to make amend. In war the two sides, combatants if you will, try to outwit or beat one another. Hence, one side tries to "hang" the other in order to prevail. Whichever side has the upper hand takes the other side as a bunch of dogs to be hung -- “massacred” -- as did (according to historical accounts) the natives of Balangiga on 28 September 1901, if that is the most possible way to achieve what one or the party involved had set out to accomplish. Even scorch and turn a big island into a howling wilderness, as did the Americans to the island of Samar, in the Philippines, in revenge after the Balangiga Incident. The Balangiga Incident took place over a century ago. Therefore, the author’s imperative is now merely a gesture to catch a prospective reader's attention on a commodity in print -- a book. But "hang", which apparently is the author's metaphor for what amounts to kill, destroy, rid, or devour a century ago in war, is all the same throughout the ages. It still is -- to varying degrees. If Bob Couttie were to write a book on the war in Iraq, one could fairly anticipate his title, Strip the Dogs Naked: The True Tragic Story Behind Misled Intelligence. Something of the sort. The facts then emerge. He will portray, with unassailable proof, as he did on Balangiga, that those stripping the dogs naked, whether in a prison or elsewhere in high places of government are themselves dogs, and more. In Hang The Dogs the author actually turns out to be the one hanging the “canines”. He exposes, with unimpeachable evidence, the cravings of the Americans and the Filipinos to devour each other -- the Americans in their lust to create an empire, the Filipinos to resist and prevent being shamed. The “awod” (a local term for shame) factor was overriding among the Filipinos in Balangiga. Bob Couttie does not fail to point this out. So much about the title. Written largely in lean prose, the book is cool. Easy to read. It is the product of a ten-year assiduous research -- possibly the most exhaustive work on the Balangiga Incident thus far, and will remain so for sometime if ever surpassed. Yet still, ironically, at some point the author hedges for want of more facts that he stipulates must be somewhere in some repositories. The book provides a reasonably adequate background of the Philippine Revolution against Spain, as it does of the history of the island of Samar itself where the town of Balangiga, the epicenter of the book, is located. Here and beyond, the author discusses the ferment that led a people to rise in rebellion. Adequately given this background, the author takes the reader quickly to the Philippine-American War. Of the Philippine Revolution against Spain, of interest is the account -- for some reason largely unknown even to many in the Philippines who claim to have good college education -- about the death of Andres Bonifacio, the founder of the secret organization Katipunan that advocated armed struggle against Spain. The author leaves little doubt that Philippine history books -- which Philippine students studied (under ill-prepared so-called professors) in some allegedly reputable schools, particularly in the decades of the ‘60s through the mid ‘80s -- had the truth swept under the rug. That is of course the period largely of the Marcosian era. And whoever may dispute Bob Couttie’s facts only exposes her/his inadequacy or ignorance. The author candidly discusses the sad event leading to the execution of the Katipunan’s “Supremo”, the title that the founder of the secret organization had chosen for himself. The next scenario becomes predictable, the emergence of Emilio Aguinaldo, Bonifacio’s rival who displayed considerable talent early in his military career, as an undisputed military and … [Read more...]

70TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF MANILA by http://www.gov.ph

battle of manila

70TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF MANILA by http://www.gov.ph The battle for the liberation of Manila—waged from February 3 to March 3, 1945, between Philippine and American forces, and the Imperial Japanese forces—is widely considered to be one of the greatest tragedies of the Second World War. One hundred thousand men, women, and children perished. Architectural heritage was reduced to rubble—the City of Manila was the second most devastated Allied capital of World War II. “The destruction of Manila was one of the greatest tragedies of World War II. Of Allied capitals in those war years, only Warsaw suffered more. Seventy percent of the utilities, 75 percent of the factories, 80 percent of the southern residential district, and 100 percent of the business district was razed.” — William Manchester, author and historian, in American Caesar “We remember them, nor shall we ever forget.” — National Artist for Literature Nick Joaquin, on the lives taken during the Battle of Manila, in the inscription of the Memorare Manila 1945 Monument in Intramuros Continue reading at: http://www.gov.ph/featured/battle-of-manila/       https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLIcUoXKTZ0KWXjXivC_RK5wwc084lZvsz&v=UdfxZrqvq1c … [Read more...]

Weapons World Wide IV 2015 – Filipino Martial Arts Weekend Germany

Weapons World Wide

https://www.facebook.com/groups/198916796845259/?fref=ts   Weapons World Wide IV 2015 - Filipino Martial Arts Weekend Mit Special Guest Master Arnold Narzo (Manila Phillippines) / Kalis Ilustrisimo Repecticion Original der zum WWW IV eigens aus Manila anreist. Er wird das Seminar am Samstag mit einem 2-stündigen Rahmenprogramm eröffnen und danach die Einheiten von Christof Fröhlich leiten. Die Referenten an beiden Tagen: Timm Blaschke - Filipino Fighting Arts http://www.filipino-fighting-arts.com/ Frank Büchner / Bahala Na Giron Arnis Escrima http://www.bahalana.de/ Christof Fröhlich Kapisanang Mandirigma Tobias Ricker - Cacoy Doce Pares Eskrima http://www.kungfu-frankfurt.de/trainer.html Benjamin Rittiner - Dog Brothers Martial Arts www.dogbrothers.ch Thomas Holdtmann http://www.qixingtanglang.de/ Ralf Kussler www. Ralf - Kussler. Com René Marc Zeller - Filipino Combat Systems http://www.fcs-germany.de/ Auch 2015 steht das Wochenende wieder im Zeichen von Stock und Klinge. Präsentiert werden acht verschiedene Stile/Systeme der philippinischen Kampfkünste. Das Seminar steht jedem offen und es ist sicher für jeden etwas dabei, ob Anfänger oder ehemaliger Anfänger. Neun der besten Referenten der philippinischen Kampfkünste werden sicher für viel Spaß und nachhaltige Eindrücke sorgen. Achtung: Übernachten in der Sporthalle möglich. Samstag Abendessen ab 20.00 Uhr Buffet mit allen Schikanen im TV Schaafheim -Sportheim Essen bis die Lähmung eintritt Preis 15.- € unbedingt vorher bestellen Frühstücksbuffet am Sonntagmorgen in der Halle 5.-€ Essen und Trinken bis zum Abwinken Der Erlös wird einem caritativen Zweck zugeführt Wenn gewünscht bitte bei der Anmeldung mitbestellen. Hotels: in und um Schaafheim Hotel Garni Gästehaus Irene Daimler Str. 10 64850 Schaafheim Tel.: 06073-87850 Fax: 06073-88644 E-mail-Anschrift: bernhardts@t-online.de www.bernhardts-schlemmerservice.de] Hotel Deutscher Hof Bismarckplatz 4 64832 Babenhausen Tel. (06073) 6046-0 Appartments und Hotel Ziegelruh Ziegelruh 1 64832 Babenhausen Tel. (06073) 7267-0 Gaststätte Zur Eisenbahn Grabenstraße 69 63762 Großostheim 06026/8485 Landgasthof Hock An der Kuhpforte 1 63762 Großostheim/Pflaumheim 06026/97160 Gaststätte Zur Post Großostheimer Str. 8 63762 Großostheim/Pflaumheim 06026/1422 Pension Ringheimer Hof Hasselstraße 9 63762 Großostheim-Ringheim internet: www.ringheimer-hof.npage.de e-mail: ringheimer.hof@googlemail.com FON/FAX: 0 60 26 - 99 35 39 Mobil: 01 51 / 25 27 75 80 Hotel Cafe Kern Familie Kern Breite Str. 77 63762 Großostheim eMail: info@hotel-cafe-kern.de Tel:06026/978740 Fax:06026/2656 Hotel Rosengarten Dellweg 8 63762 Großostheim internet: www.rosengarten-hill.de] e-mail: hotel@rosengarten-hill.de Tel:06026/1887 Fax:06026/2989 Landhaushotel Familie Zimmermann Ostring 8a 63762 Großostheim/Ringheim Tel:06026/6081 Fax:06026/2212 Benötigt werden 2 Rattanstöcke 70 cm, 1 Traingsmesser und persönliche Schutzausrüstung wie gewünscht, wie Handschuhe, Schutzbrille, etc. 1 Langstock von 160 cm aufwärts wer hat mitbringen für die Einheit bei Gong Fu Thomas Holdtmann JuWe-Sticks und Panabas y Puntadas werden an beiden Tagen wieder mit einem Verkaufsstand und SICHER guten Lehrgangspreisen dabei sein :o)) http://www.juwe-sticks.de/ http://www.panabas.com/] Samstag, 11. April, 11:00 – 19:00 Uhr Sonntag, 10. April, 10:00 – 16:00 Uhr Seminargebühren: beide Tage 120,- € ein Tag 70,- € Anmeldung: Werner Nebauer 0160 / 96926125 werner@juwe-sticks.de ====================================================================================== IF YOU NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE DON'T HESITATE TO CONTACT US!!! ENGLISH: Weapons World Wide IV 2015 - Filipino Martial Arts Weekend Special Guest: Master Arnold Narzo (Manila Phillippines) / Kalis Ilustrisimo Repecticion Original who will be travelling from the phillipines for this seminar. He will open the seminar Saturday Morning with a 2 hour presentation of his art and will then teach the lessons of Christof Froehlich The instructors on both days are the following: Timm Blaschke - Filipino Fighting Arts http://www.filipino-fighting-arts.com/ Frank Buechner / Bahala Na Giron Arnis Escrima http://www.bahalana.de/ Christof Froehlich Kapisanang Mandirigma Tobias Ricker - Cacoy Doce Pares Eskrima http://www.kungfu-frankfurt.de/trainer.html Benjamin Rittiner - Dog Brothers Martial Arts www.dogbrothers.ch Thomas Holtmann http://www.qixingtanglang.de/ Ralf Kussler www. Ralf - Kussler. Com René Marc Zeller - Filipino Combat Systems http://www.fcs-germany.de/ In 2015 the weekend will be determined by the blade and the stick again. 8 different styles of filipino martial arts will be presented that … [Read more...]

Kamagong (1986 Filipino Arnis film) – with English subtitles

Kamagong kali arnis eskrima lameco bakbakan ilustrisimo mandirigma.org

Kamagong (1986 Filipino Arnis film) - with English subtitles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csJaY6la970&feature=youtu.be     Studio Viva Films Description It started as a weekly comic series in Super Action Pocketkomiks written by the legendary Filipino writer Carlo J. Caparas. It was later adapted into in a movie that stars Lito Lapid as Manuel andJC Bonnin as Ariel in 1986. Plot Outline The plot is about a sacred pair of arnis sticks " Kamagong". Lorenzo (the villian) steals the Kamagong and kills Ariel's brother in a duel. Ariel vows revenge and to get Kamagong back from Lorenzo. Manuel and his Grandmaster trained the Ariel for his his match against Lorenzo. The movie ended with a climatic double stick battle witness by the whole town. There was even a cameo appearance by Angel Cabales. Starring Lito Lapid, J.C. Bonnin, Ruel Vernal, Mia Prats, Bong Dimayacyac, Dencio Padilla, Eddie Garcia, Jaime Fabregas, Beth Bautista Directed By Carlo J. Caparas Written By Carlo J. Caparas Screenplay By Carlo J. Caparas and Rene O. Villanueva Produced By Vic Del Rosario, Jr., Tony Gloria, and Ramon Salvador     KAMAGONG KOMIK Illustrated by Rudy V. Villanueva Super Action Pocketkomiks, 1986-1987 … [Read more...]

Bakbakan Philippines Classes in Alabang, 2015.

bakbakan philippines

Bakbakan Philippines Classes in Alabang, 2015.   … [Read more...]

Photo: Philippine Scouts at 1904 World’s Fair doing the Bolo Drill (Photo courtesy of the Philippine Scouts Heritage Society)

lameco sog

(Photo courtesy of the Philippine Scouts Heritage Society) … [Read more...]

New Lameco Eskrima Book by Guro David Gould released 2014. Published by Mark Wiley’s – Tambuli Media.

lameco-eskrima-cover

New Lameco Eskrima Book by Guro David Gould released 2014. Published by Mark Wiley's - Tambuli Media.     In the art of Eskrima, few names stand out like the late Edgar Salute’s. He dedicated his life to mastering the art of Eskrima and put his reputation on the line, taking challenges for money and honor. He earned the confidence of a collection of legendary grandmasters of the day, and earned the mutual respect of his era’s newest masters. When Sulite came to the United States he took the country—and then the world—by storm. In this unique book, Guro David E. Gould recounts the life, the art and the legacy of Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and his Lameco Eskrima system. Broken down into 10 distinct chapters, Lameco Eskrima: The Legacy of Edgar Sulite, presents the evolution of a fighter and his art, from his early days in Tacloban City and Ozamis City, through his middle period in Manila, and finally his later years in the United States. http://www.amazon.com/Lameco-Eskrima-Legacy-Edgar-Suilite/dp/0692306757/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1415230995&sr=8-2&keywords=lameco+eskrima   http://tambulimedia.com/ … [Read more...]

Lameco/Ilustrisimo/Bakbakan Workshop with Guro Doran Sordo and Guro Dino Flores in FMA Informative Newspaper Vol3 No12 – 2014

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Lameco/Ilustrisimo/Bakbakan Workshop with Guro Doran Sordo and Guro Dino Flores in FMA Informative Newspaper Vol3 No12 – 2014     … [Read more...]

Lameco Eskrima Mexico Camp 2014 in FMA Informative Newspaper – Vol3 No11 – 2014

FMA_Informative_Newspaper-Vol3No11-2014

Lameco Eskrima Mexico Camp 2014 in FMA Informative Newspaper - Vol3 No11 - 2014   … [Read more...]

Close Quarter Gun vs Knife Tactics – 8 week course with live fire in Las Vegas, Nevada. With Guro Ariel Mosses of Combat FMA

Combat fma2

 Quarter Gun vs Knife Tactics - 8 week course with live fire in Las Vegas, Nevada. Close Quarter Gun vs Knife Tactics - 8 week course with live fire in Las Vegas, Nevada. With Guro Ariel Mosses of Combat FMA http://t.co/S7hhM1WbGm http://combatfma.com/special-events.html http://combatfma.com/about-ariel-f.-mosses.html     … [Read more...]

Workshop: Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois, Sunday Dec. 7, 2014. Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin

Manaois

Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois Workshop Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois will be conducting a workshop this Sunday Dec. 7 at Las Vegas Lohan School of Shaolin showcasing his combat proven, close quarter fighting techniques!   … [Read more...]

The first written account of “KALI” as the pre-Hispanic name of the Filipino Martial Arts by FMA History Redux

Mga Karunungan

The first written account of "KALI" as the pre-Hispanic name of the Filipino Martial Arts Source: http://fmahistoryredux.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-first-written-account-of-kali-as.html?spref=fb http://fmahistoryredux.blogspot.com/2014/11/philippine-hero-rev-fr-gregorio-aglipay.html “Mga Karunungan sa Larong Arnis” by Placido Yambao and Buenaventura Mirafuente, University of the Philippines Press, 1957... the first book on the Filipino Martial Arts that we know now... its section on the history of the Filipino Martial Arts stated that when the Spaniards arrived in the Philippines, Filipino Martial Arts was not yet called "ARNIS" but "KALI" (“Ang KALI na dinatnan ng mga Kastila ay hindi pa ARNIS ang tawag noong 1610")... The book also mentioned that a KALI demonstration was once performed in honor of the newly-arrived Conquistador Miguel Lopez de Legazpi on the order of a tribal leader in the Island of Leyte...     Philippine Hero Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay, the source of Yambao & Mirafuente's "KALI"...   REV. FR. GREGORIO AGLIPAY, 1860-1940 (center), the first Supreme Bishop of the Philippine Independent Church (Wikipedia photo)...Rev. Fr. Aglipay was the source of the information that the original name of the Filipino Martial Arts is KALI in the book “Mga Karunungan sa Larong Arnis” authored by Placido Yambao and Buenaventura Mirafuente (University of the Philippines Press, 1957):'Ang KALI na Dinatnan ng mga Kastila ay Hindi pa Arnis ang Tawag nuong 1610.... Noong unang panahon ang larong ito'y kilala sa tawag na "KALI" ng ating mga ninuno, nguni't sa hindi maiwasang pagbabago ng panahon at pangyayari (underscoring mine) ay pinamagatan nila ng "Panandata" sa Tagalog, "Pagkalikali" sa kapatagan ng Kagayan ng mga Ibanag, "Kalirongan" sa Pangasinan, "Kaliradman" sa Bisaya at "Pagaradman" sa Ilongo nuong 1860, at "Didya" sa Ilokos at muling naging "Kabaroan," ayon kay Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay na bantog din sa arnis nuong 1872.'TRANSLATION: 'The indigenous martial art that the Spanish encountered in 1610 was not yet called Arnis at that time. During those times, this martial art was known as "KALI" to our ancestors.  Due to theunavoidable changing of the times and circumstances (underscoring mine), this martial art became known as "Panandata" to the Tagalogs, "Pagkalikali" to the Ibanags of the plains of Cagayan, "Kalirongan" to the people of Pangasinan, "Kaliradman" to the Visayans, "Pagaradman" to the Ilonggos in 1860, and "Didya" to the Ilocanos (but later on changed to "Kabaroan").  This is according to Rev. Fr. Gregorio Aglipay, who himself was a famous Arnis practitioner in 1872.' … [Read more...]

Eskrima Workshop: with Guro Doran Sordo and Guro Dino Flores. Boracay Island, Philippines. Oct 30th to Nov 5th, 2014.

Bakbakan Lameco Ilustrisimo

Bakbakan Combat Arts International Senior Instructor -Doran Sordo. Guro Doran Sordo has had the privilege to begin training in his teens under the legendary Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, Master Yuli Romo, Master Tony Diego, Master Christopher Ricketts and Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo himself. Guro Dino is a long time practitioner who has had the privilege to train with under legendary Masters -  Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, Master Yuli Romo, Master Tony Diego and Master Christopher Ricketts. … [Read more...]

Filipino Martial Arts Reported in a New York Newspaper, 1900

1900 FMA Kali Arnis Eskrima Escrima

Filipino Martial Arts Reported in a New York Newspaper, 1900 Article From: http://martialartsnewyork.org/2014/10/14/filipino-martial-arts-reported-in-a-new-york-newspaper-1900/ On October 28, 1900, a lengthy article appeared in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, describing the many weapons used by the native inhabitants of the Philippines, as well as details pertaining to the method of their use, and rituals in the duel. The article, complete with illustrations, is probably one of the first in America to detail the martial culture of the Philippines, and is almost certainly the first such article to appear in New York State. Although Filipino martial arts such as Kali and Arnis had likely not yet made their appearances in New York, this article offers a fascinating glimpse at how such fighting arts were viewed by visiting Americans at the turn of the century. After an initial examination of the social importance of the Bolo and its method of manufacture, the article proceeds to describe other indigenous weapons and their manner of use. The first is the Sundang, or northern (Luzon) version of the Bolo: “The weapon is curiously shaped and cunningly balanced so as to throw the weight toward the striking end. Even a light blow is terribly effective. The average Filipino is as dextrous in handling the sundang as a fencing master is with the rapier.” Next, the Campilan is described: “It is carried over the shoulder and is never unsheathed for the first stroke. When necessity for its use arises it is brought down on the head with the scabbard on it. The blade cuts through the thread, thus unsheathing itself…There is a regular drill the Moros go through with this weapon, cutting and chopping with extraordinary swiftness while continually leaping hither and thither to avoid the return of the enemy. An individual encounter between two natives armed with the campilan presents a curious and startling spectacle. One sees the sudden stroke, hears the clap and rattle of the wooden scabbard as it lands and watches it fall to the ground in halves…It seems hideously incongruous that the recipient of the stroke should go down with his skull split at the same moment. But the sheathed steel does its work swiftly and such duels are over with the first swing that reaches the mark.” Next, the article describes the method of using the Kris, the staff officer’s favorite weapon: “The approved kris stroke is for the body with a peculiar weaving motion of the wrist, supposed to send the blade home and spread the wound…it is brandished above the head of the charging leader, a beacon of victory.” Also described is the smaller punal de kris, a “diminutive but deadly weapon,” as well as the quinabasi, or knife of the private soldier: “He carries it very much as the American private does his bayonet…Generally speaking it is a utensil rather than a weapon, though by no means to be despised at close quarters.” The author describes other weapons as well such as the terciada, borong, andtalibong. If you’d like to read more, the entire article can be loaded and read by clicking on the image below. Also, if you enjoyed this article, see: Filipino versus Spanish Knife Fighters and a Duel in New York City, 1931   … [Read more...]

Tribute and tribulation by Romeo Macapagal for Manila Times. A Tribute to Grandmaster Tony Diego.

Tribute and tribulation by Romeo Macapagal for Manila Times. A Tribute to Grandmaster Tony Diego.   Original article at this link: http://www.manilatimes.net/tribute-tribulation/122855/     When a human being rises to the greatest heights of achievement possible in spite of in surmountable obstacles, this is greatness. When this level of accomplishment is matched with kindness and compassion, with surpassing generosity even at the sacrifice of personal material needs, this greatness is defined by spirituality and becomes the “Grandeur of the Human Spirit.” This was Antonio Ramoneda Diego. Father, husband, friend, student, mentor, benefactor. A measure of Tony’s humanity and greatness is the fact that he has raised a brood of eight children, two children-in-law, and two grandchildren, and yet none of these children are his and his wife’s biological issue. Yet, he has struggled, worked hard and honestly to raise them, still looking after them till the time of his death, being especially fond of the grandchildren. As a husband, Tony was especially devoted to his wife Gelynn and loved her so much he could not face life without her. When she was stricken with cancer, he too deteriorated in health and overtook her in death. Gelynn is now very frail and may follow Tony soon. It seems she too cannot live without Tony. When his house burned down, the proceeds of his retirement went up in smoke. It is a measure of his loving, caring character that his students gathered resources so that Tony could rebuild his house to provide a home for his family. And when his wife needed medical care, his students returned in full measure the loving attention and generous instruction he had given them. He was as attentive, caring and generous to his students as he was with his own children. Under Antonio “Tatang” Ilustrisimo, Tony was a diligent student, loyal and generous as much as his resources would allow. He modeled Tatang in practically every aspect of living and his goal was to become exactly like Tatang. When Tony became a master in his own right, he taught ceaselessly, sharing unstintingly of his knowledge. He studied and planned endlessly to be able to transmit his knowledge and skill to the increasing number of adherents to the Ilustrisimo system under him. Tony contributed very much to the popularity and fame of Filipino Martial Arts (FMA). He had given a foreign seminar only once, 30 years ago, and in spite of moving no further than the confines of Tondo district, the Luneta, and rarely beyond the City of Manila, he was able to contribute to the fame of the FMA, that icon of the Filipino, so that the FMA is the object of study of so many followers around the world. Tony was a good friend, warm, generous, loyal and sincere. He had a gift of natural leadership and charisma. While prone to fits of temper, this was mostly directed at those who would offend his friends. Tony’s material resources were never enough. Yet he maintained his dignity and honesty at his work as a stevedoring supervisor and later manager. Even when other FMA teachers were making a good living from student’s payments, Tony remained undemanding, accepting whatever amount was given him, never charging a fixed fee. When paid, he took care to share with those who helped him teach. Even when his house burned down, part of funds he received for reconstruction were shared as food for his neighboring fire victims. Tony’s undemanding and gentle approach made him victim by many unscrupulous students who exploited his knowledge and generous nature. He would be hurt by their actions but then forgave easily. The trials and tribulations of Tony’s life eventually wore him down, both physically and emotionally, but his spirit as a swordsman and teacher prevailed, always thinking of the future of his students in terms of their continuing learning. A man’s character is measured by the sincere regard given him by others. With Tony, it is the love, affection and gratitude given by students all over the world to provide for those he has left behind because they know he loved them so much. Tony is gone, and like all great men there is no replacing him. Once in several lifetimes, there are such men as him, but not very often. Faced with adversity, they triumph over obstacles to rise to the heights of greatness in their chosen field. Like the “Grand Old Man of the Sword,” Antonio “Tatang” Ilustrisimo, his master, teacher and model, Antonio “Tony” Diego has achieved greatness. Original article at this link: http://www.manilatimes.net/tribute-tribulation/122855/ … [Read more...]

Guro Doran Sordo pays tribute to his long time teacher Grandmaster Tony Diego.

Guro Doran Sordo

  I met Mang Tony Diego Kalis Ilustrisimo around 1986. He was introduced to me by my master, GM Topher Ricketts when we would accompany him to practice at the Luneta park on Sundays or the gym in Binondo. As the years passed, Master Topher would always ask Master Tony to teach me some techniques and polish details in my form whether it be stance, swing, footwork, etc. Master Tony was always so generous in his teaching and would share so much. I know him to be a quiet, humble man who would always tell me not to call him "Master". Whenever he saw me, he would always fondly greet me by exclaiming "Sord!" and he always had a smile on his face whenever i came to Luneta. We would sit sometimes between practice and just chat. He would tell me about the good old days with Master Topher, showing me techniques while we were chatting. How he remembers us when we were still young and would joke that we were thinner then. He was a learned man, who would often ask me how my spiritual practice was coming along. I remember one of the last conversations I had with Master Topher before he passed away. He told me "Never forget your Ilustrisimo. See Master Tony as often as you can and learn as much as you can. You practice what you learn until you are old." I remember now the last conversation i had with Master Tony at his home in Tondo. He said to always be mindful of the details. I remember the last time I saw him. It was a day before he passed away. We said a prayer together and I went downstairs so he could rest. I am honoured to be his student and proud to continue his legacy however way I can. I feel privileged to have been able to spend some time with him and learn from this great teacher. I can almost hear swords clashing as he is reunited once again with Grand Master Tatang Ilustrisimo, GM Topher Ricketts and PG Edgar Sulite. We miss you Master Tony. Paalam Po, GM Tony Diego. Pugay   … [Read more...]

Rest In Peace Master Tony Diego, Head of Kalis Ilustrisimo. August 25, 2014

Master Diego 1

  Rest In Peace Master Tony Diego, Head of Kalis Ilustrisimo. Rest In Peace Master Tony Diego. Thank you for the friendship, knowledge and wisdom you shared. I hope you are now happily practicing again with your dear teacher - Grandmaster Antonio Ilustrisimo. Along with your old training buddies Master Christopher Ricketts and Punong Guro Edgar Sulite who also departed way too soon. Love & Respect,Dino Flores … [Read more...]

Guro Dave Gould of Lameco Eskrima pays tribute to Grandmaster Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrismo.

Master Tony Diego Ilustrisimo

Guro Dave Gould of Lameco Eskrima pays tribute to Grandmaster Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrismo. I just wanted to pass on some sad news, that being the passing of Grand Master Tony Diego of Kalis Ilustrisimo fame. He passed due to a long illness yesterday on August 25, 2014 (Philippine Time). GM Tony Diego and Master Yuli Romo were the first students of GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo who formally began their training with the old battle tested Grand Master in 1977. years later along came PG Edgar G. Sulite, Master Christopher N. Ricketts and Master Rey Galang who were recognized as the 5 Pillars of Kalis Ilustrisimo and were credited with spending the most time training directly under the astute tutelage of GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo as well as them being credited with better organizing the Kalis Ilustrisimo system and creating its curriculum based on the movements and reactions of their teacher, "Tatang" Ilustrisimo regarding that discipline. For us in the Lameco Eskrima System Master Tony Diego was a great influence and he was the one who really brought PG Edgar G. Sulite to Kalis Ilustrisimo and to GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo, basically resulting from a sparring match between PG Edgar G. Sulite and Master Tony Diego, this was a defining moment in the evolution of the Lameco Eskrima System as we know it today, simply because up until this sparring session Lameco Eskrima was comprised of only 4 major influences, those being; De Campo 1-2-3 Orehenal, Kali Pekiti-Tirsia, Modernos Largos and the Sulite Rapelon Style along with the 6 minor influences of the system. Kalis Ilustrisimo would prove to be the missing piece of the system and this was discovered during that very crucial sparring session between PG Edgar G.Sulite and Master Tony Diego so many years ago. The result of that sparring match saw PG Edgar G. Sulite becoming a student of Kalis Ilustrisimo under GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo and over the years adding countless techniques, concepts and principles from Kalis Ilustrisimo to the Lameco Eskrima curriculum to strike a fine balance to the system, especially regarding the blade and dagger portion of the curriculum. Master Tony Diego became fast friends with PG Edgar G. Sulite and remained a very close friend for the rest of Edgar`s life and was partially responsible for the International Recognition of Kalis Ilustrisimo, Bakbakan International and Lameco Eskrima International along with Master Yuli Romo, Master Christopher Ricketts, PG Edgar G. Sulite and Master Rey Galang. After GM Antonio "Tatang" Ilustrisimo Passed away in 1997 Master Tony Diego being the heir apparent of the system was elected by the other senior members of kalis Ilustrisimo to take control of the system. It is a shame that he has been taken from us but he was taken contributing much back to the Filipino Warrior Arts Community from which much was given him over his life time. Rest in Peace Master Tony Diego and long live your legacy! … [Read more...]

Respecting the Grand Masters of the Warrior Arts in the Philippines by Jay Ignacio

Respecting the Grand Masters of the Warrior Arts in the Philippines by Jay Ignacio   Those who have seen The Bladed Hand would have understood that a lot of the Grand Masters in the Philippines are not well-off. They live in very tough conditions, some are employed for a paltry sum, and there are others who have no source of income other than when they have students to teach.Please be understanding when you approach them and do not ask for discounted rates, or take advantage of them by giving them empty promises of compensation or trips abroad.FMA may give some folks abroad a decent income, or even "street cred", but here in the Philippines, these Masters do not own gyms or schools or training facilities. They teach in public parks, or give private lessons at the students' homes.Pay them on time whatever rate you agreed on per session, and have the decency to acknowledge them for what they taught you. Pay, or at the very least, offer to pay them for their cab, or bus, or jeepney ride to meet up with you. Feed them as well, especially if ask to meet at a cafe or restaurant.Be mindful of the fact that photo ops with the Masters sometimes have consequences not favorable to them. Note that when you bug them to give you a certificate (when they normally don't because they have no registered business for their FMA system) for just a few days or hours of training, you are taking something away from them. There's just too much of this going around. A lot of them complain, but there is no avenue for them to adress any of their concerns. Sometimes they give in because they have no choice. It's a matter of understanding, and of respecting their intellectual property, among other things.   http://youtu.be/2LK2SNOWqdI … [Read more...]

Lameco Eskrima S.O.G. in Mexico. October 3, 4, 5 – 2014.

Lameco Eskrima 2014

Lameco Eskrima S.O.G. in Mexico. October 3, 4, 5 - 2014.   … [Read more...]

Photo Archive: Lameco Practitioners & Friends at the Dog Brothers Gathering in 1997

lameco SOG at dog bros

Photo Archive: Lameco Practitioners & Friends at the Dog Brothers Gathering in 1997 Photo courtesy of Arnold Noche. This photo was taken in 1997.  It was at the Dog Brothers Gathering in Hermosa Beach, California. Arnold was in town from NYC. Some of the people in the photo: Arnold Noche, Dino Flores, Ron Balicki, Diana Inosanto, Sebastian, Al, Perla,  JP, Crafty Dog, Hans Tan, Nick Papadakis, Sung Han, Felix and Dogzilla.   … [Read more...]

FMA Informative – Issue 138 – featuring Fanged Blade with Guro Ariel Flores Mosses and Lance Parvin.

Ariel Mosses Lameco Ilustrisimo

  FMA Informative - Issue 138 - Fanged Blade What is the Fanged Blade Program? -Technique Examples --Fanged Blade --Manaois System --Lameco Footwork Within Filipino Martial Arts A Tactical Professionals’ View Fanged Blade in Action - A Students’ Perspective The Cultural Arts Training Foundation The FMA Informative in talking with Lance Parvin found out that the Fanged Blade was created by Ariel Mosses and Lance Parvin to address worst-case scenarios. The program incorporates several arts and systems, mainly comprised of Filipino martial arts including: Lameco S.O.G, Kali Ilustrisimo, and Manaois Eskrima, Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis. Based on violent, destructive, and killing strikes, Filipino ground fighting (Buno), and “uninterrupted biting and eye gouging” (Kagatin at Mangamot ng Mata) techniques are emphasized. Fanged Blade comes under the main organization, “The Cultural Arts Training Foundation” which uses movement arts to empower those dealing with traumatic injury, PTSD, and bullying. The programs are developed by qualified professionals with dynamic backgrounds in movement including: kinesiology, gymnastics, martial arts, dance, and yoga. Lance Parvin, Founder and Executive Director, created the organization after his own traumatic injury from a near fatal car accident left him with spine damage. Visit www.fmainformative.info and download a copy. Link - www.fmainformative.info/Informative_Issues/2014/FMA_Informative-Issue138.pdf … [Read more...]

Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 21st, 2014

Ariel Dino Lameco Ilustrisimo Arnis Kali Eskrima FMA

Ten Tigers Martial Arts Las Vegas presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 21st, 2014 … [Read more...]

Guro Dino from Kapisanang Mandirigma reflects on teaching Eskrima at the Non-Profit organizations in Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles.

eskrima kali arnis fma 1

Guro Dino from Kapisanang Mandirigma reflects on teaching Eskrima at the Non-Profit organizations in Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles. When our teacher Punong Guro Edgar Sulite passed away, the group wanted to honor his work but in the least commercial way possible. We weren't sure how we could do it...and looking back I am not sure why we wanted to do it that way. One day after one of our countless demos around the city, Aki from PWC approached me to do a history workshop at Glendale City College. Afterwards she asked if I would like to use the art to help at risk to kids to gangs violence and drug use. My first reaction was "are you sure?" I was thinking we are kind of a rough bunch and we are wielding sticks, knives and swords and were more like a gang ourselves. I didn't think it was exactly appropriate at the time. I was reminded that the Rampart district (where the movie "Training Day" was set) had the highest murder rate in the city at the time and was kind of rough itself with numerous hyper violent gangs such as MS13 and 18th St. claiming the area as their turf. Thus I half heartedly accepted. Anyway, to cut a long story short - our recruiter was right. We had a surprisingly high success rate with the youth. Just a few minor glitches like gunshot wounds, knife fights, comas and molotov cocktails on roofs...but thats another story.From what I can gather, most of the rougher kids changed their ways....after maybe a little backyard method persuasion techniques. Two things were very effective. 1.Military style drilling, rules and lots of push ups for the whole class if someone was out of line - Guro Bud was an expert at this method. 2. Lots and lots of sparring. Be it Eskrima, Grappling, Kickboxing etc. If they were very bad they would have to spar everyone in class ending with me. It was truly a transformative and effective method...but probably illegal in several states...lol. Some parents told us their kids grades had gone up. Another parent told us that a school teacher said to her that her son was "The most moral student in the school" (since joining the program)...still makes me laugh. We had an amazing experience doing volunteer work with those great Non-Profit Community organization like SIPA, PWC and FilAm ARTS. The at risk youth positive diversion program from gangs and drugs we taught from 1997 to 2004 was a big learning experience for us all. I am proud that when government funding was low or disappeared, we didn't let it stop us. Instead myself, Guro Arnold A. Noche and Guro Bud Balani Jr. offered adult classes at the centers at an affordable rate and used the proceeds to assist in funding the youth programs. One of the adult students even got Asics to sponsor us for a semester and we got some cases of their wrestling shoes. It was a grand adventure that took us far and wide. What more could you ask for, help a few kids out, teach a few adults some culture and still train in the art you love. All that was missing was a small paycheck for the Eskrima staff...lol. It's funny to think that all those non-martial artist participants who went through the program where forced to learn our Eskrima lineage and history. They were exposed to Lameco and the teacher in our lineage such as GM Ilustrisimo and his 5 Pillars (GM Tony Diego, GM Yuli Romo, GM Rey Galang, GM Christopher Ricketts and PG Edgar Sulite), GM Caballero and various other arts over the years. Our first guest instructor at the program was none other than the legendary Grandmaster Doc Lengson - which was an incredible honor for me. Not only was GM Dr. Guillermo B. “Doc” Lengson one of Master Ricketts teachers. He was also the one who advised GM Presas to add "Modern" to Arnis. GM Lenson also advised PG Sulite to use the title" Punong Guro". Punong Guro was the first to use this term in the Martial Arts, all others since were somehow inspired by his usage. GM Lengson was the first to feature FMA on Philippine TV. One of the TV shows had a 14 year old Master Ricketts representing Sagasa Kickboxing fighting a seasoned professional boxer. With another legend GM Roland Dantes as a judge. Other guest instructors at our program included GM Taboada, GM Gaabucayan, GM Manaois, GM Olavides, Guro Ariel Mosses, Guro Hans Tan and half of Lameco SOG. What a journey. Maybe this is why the kids responded.     Some items of recognition for our volunteer work back in the days of seemingly limitless energy. … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses to teach Kali, Arnis & Eskrima at Ten Tigers Martial Arts, Las Vegas. August 4th, 2014.

Escrima Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Kali Arnis Eskrima

Guro Ariel Flores to teach Mosses Kali, Arnis & Eskrima at Ten Tigers Martial Arts, Las Vegas   … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii, Saturday, September 13th & 14th, 2014

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Kali Arnis Eskrima

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii, Saturday, September 13th & 14th, 2014 Announcing the upcoming seminar in Honolulu, Hawaii September 13 & 14, 2014. Please check out our exciting new website at www.combatfma.com designed by humaninterestvideoproductions@gmail.com   \ … [Read more...]

Seminar: Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 20th, 2014

Kali Arnis Eskrima Lameco Ilustrisimo

    Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, September 20th, 2014       Guro Dino and Guro Ariel have been training partners since the 1980′s. They first began teaching seminars together in the 1990′s in Wahington State, Oregon, Nevada and California. About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Masters Bruce and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Masters Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts are now officially the head of the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts “Ilustrisimo” organization which strives to preserve the purity of the art. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego.Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino also cites the importance of his training partners in Lameco SOG and Kapisanang Mandirigma in his growth. After the passing of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, certain members of the Lameco Backyard group reformed also became know as Kapisanang Mandirigma. The group regularly continued  training, sparring, experimenting and seeking the deeper roots of their chosen arts. This group includes Guros Joel Adriatico, Hospecio “Bud” Balani Jr., Mar Elepaño, Choy Flores, Arnold Noche, Gary Quan, Hans Anton Tan and Pantaleon “Mang Leo” Revilles, Jr. (RIP). With frequent visits by Guro Lowell Pueblos, Guro Bong Hebia and honorary member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses.   … [Read more...]

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Launches New Website @ http://combatfma.com

combat fma

Guro Ariel Flores Mosses:   About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada. Guro Ariel will be one of the instructors at Jeff Speakman’s 5.0 Fighter Event Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. June 27, 28, 29 – 2012.   To contact Guro Ariel go to: http://combatfma.com/index.html   … [Read more...]

Illustration: Various Philippine Blades

blades

    Illustration: Various Philippine Blades   … [Read more...]

Documentary: World War II: Manila Clean-Up (1945)

manila

http://youtu.be/NtR4UTFQOGM   A month after the 1st Cavalry Division arrived in the Philippines, the battle for Manila’s liberation finally met its conclusion. The wrath of war resulted to the deaths of 100,000 Filipino civilians and the destruction of stunning landmarks that once made Manila the Pearl of the Orient.   In 1995, a monument called the “Memorare-Manila 1945” was placed at Plazuela de Sta. Isabel in Intramuros to remember this dark chapter in country’s history. The inscription, which was penned by National Artist Nick Joaquin, says that “This memorial is dedicated to all those innocent victims of war, many of whom went nameless and unknown to a common grave, or never even knew a grave at all, their bodies having been consumed by fire or crushed to dust beneath the rubble of ruins.”   From: http://www.filipiknow.net/rare-historical-videos-philippines/   … [Read more...]

Documentary: The End of Manila 1945, The Forgotten Atrocity (Warning: Graphic Content)

End of Manila

http://youtu.be/RzmE8H5wiC8   Battle of Manila (1945) The month-long  Battle of Manila in 1945 was one of the bloodiest moments of WWII, killing at least 100, 000 Filipino civilians who were either bombed or bayoneted–some were even burned alive.   It all started when the American forces led by Field Marshal Douglas MacArthur arrived in Manila in January 1945. Their initial goals were to liberate Allied civilians interned at UST as well as seize the Malacañan Palace, which they were able to achieve. Threatened by the advancing American forces, the group under General Tomoyuki Yamashita withdrew to Baguio City. All hell broke loose when Rear Admiral Sanji Iwabuchi refused to surrender and chose to defend the city until death. Historical buildings and bridges were destroyed, Bayview Hotel served as a rape center, and entire row of houses were burned together with their occupants. Thousands of innocent Filipino civilians were killed using the most atrocious of methods–they were massacred with the help of machine guns, katanas, and bayonets. In his book “American Caesar,”  author William Manchester wrote that the “devastation of Manila was one of the great tragedies of World War II. Seventy percent of the utilities, 72 percent of the factories, 80 percent of the southern residential district, and 100 percent of the business district were razed… Hospitals were set afire after their patients had been strapped to their beds. The corpses of males were mutilated, females of all ages were raped before they were slain, andbabies’ eyeballs gouged out and smeared on walls like jelly.”   From: http://www.filipiknow.net/rare-historical-videos-philippines/   … [Read more...]

The Bolomen of the Revolution by Perry Gil S. Mallari , FIGHT Times Editor

An illustration by J. Alexander Mackay published in the book Bamboo Tales by Ira L. Reeves (1900) IMAGE FROM PROJECT GUTENBERG

The Bolomen of the Revolution by Perry Gil S. Mallari , FIGHT Times Editor Arma Blanca is the name of the clandestine regiment of Filipino bolomen active during the revolution against the Spaniards and the Americans. Arma Blanca is a Spanish singular term for a bladed weapon like a sword or a knife. A fairly recent mention of Arma Blanca was made in Orlino Ochosa’s book Bandoleros: The Outlawed Guerillas of the Philippine-American War of 1903 to 1907 (New Day Publications, 1995), and it reads, “Manila’s Arma Blanca that phantom army of bolomen whom General Luna had so much depended upon in his bold attack of Manila at the start of the war with the Americans.” An earlier reference to Arma Blanca can be found in The Philippines Past and Present, by Dean C. Worcester released in 1914. Worcester, who had served as Secretary of the Interior of the Philippine Islands from 1901 to 1913 and was a member of the Philippine Commission from 1900 to 1913, wrote, “The regiment of Armas Blancas had already been raised in Tondo and Binondo. It was in existence there in December, 1898, and may have been originally organized to act against Spain.” The bolo being both a farm implement and a weapon was carried with impunity by Filipinos even in the presence of Spanish and American soldiers. Its blade is often designed heavily weighted towards the tip for ease of chopping hence when used in combat, it can easily severe a limb with a single stroke. The Philippine bolo boasts of a sturdy construction and minor dents on its blade could easily be fixed by a little hammering and filing. In the absence of guns, the Philippine revolutionary forces greatly depended upon the bolo in inflicting casualty on the enemy. A part of Worcester’s book reads, “There is no reason for believing that this is a complete statement of sandatahan [Filipino armed groups] organized in Manila by the end of January, and yet this statement gives a force of at least 6,330 men. General Otis said that this force had been reported to him as being 10,000 men. It is probably true that only a small number of them had rifles; but armed with long knives and daggers they could have inflicted much damage in a sudden night attack in the narrow and badly lighted streets of Manila.” Filipino bolomen even received precise instructions on how to use the blade in conducting raids to snatch the guns of their enemies. A part of Emilio Aguinaldo’s order to the sandatahan was included in Worcester’s book, and it reads, “At the moment of the attack the sandatahan should not attempt to secure rifles from their dead enemies, but shall pursue, slashing right and left with bolos until the Americans surrender, and after there remains no enemy who can injure them, they may take the rifles in one hand and the ammunition in the other.” Continue reading story at: http://www.manilatimes.net/the-bolomen-of-the-revolution/104227/ … [Read more...]

Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, May 31st, 2014

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Kapisanang Mandirigma Las Vegas Presents presents Guro Dino Flores and Guro Ariel Flores Mosses Seminar in Ilustrisimo & Lameco Eskrima. Las Vegas, Nevada, Saturday, May 31st, 2014     Guro Dino and Guro Ariel have been training partners since the 1980′s. They first began teaching seminars together in the 1990′s in Wahington State, Oregon, Nevada and California. About Guro Ariel: Guro Ariel F. Mosses has over 30 years of Filipino Martial Arts experience. He has trained under Filipino Hall of Fame Grand Master Conrad A. Manaois, the late Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite, and Grand Master Christopher Ricketts of Kali Ilustrisimo. Guro Mosses is the Vice President and Chief Instructor for Manaois Systems International. He holds a 7th degree in Kali Jukune Do. Guro Ariel is a member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. He has experience as a professional bodyguard and is a former police officer. Guro Ariel is currently teaching at LV Tactical Training in Las Vegas, Nevada.   About Guro Dino: Guro Dino trained for many years with Grandmaster Conrad A. Manaois in Ninoy Cinco Teros Arnis and Master Henry Bio in Sikaran Arnis in the 1980′s along with his cousins Ariel Flores Mosses and Choy Flores. In the early 1990′s he was accepted as an initial member of Punong Guro Edgar Sulites’ newly forming Backyard Group AKA the Sulite Oriehenal Group At the recommendation of Punong Guro Sulite, Guro Dino first visited Master Christopher Ricketts in the Philippines in 1995 and was introduced to his perspective on the Warrior Arts.  Since the passing of Punong Guro Sulite,  he has continuously train in Kali Ilustrisimo Under Master Christopher Ricketts, who gave Guro Dino permission to teach his method before his passing. Guro Dino was the Lameco representative for Master Ricketts and a member of Bakbakan Philippines sponsored by Master Ricketts. Guro Dino continues his training in Master Ricketts method of training with his two sons, the young Masters Bruce and Guro Brandon Ricketts. Masters Bruce Ricketts and Guro Brandon Ricketts are now officially the head of the late Grandmaster Christopher Ricketts “Ilustrisimo” organization which strives to preserve the purity of the art. Guro Dino additionally had good fortune to experience training in Kali Ilustrisimo with Dodong Sta. Iglesia, Grandmaster Rey Galang, Grandmaster Yuli Romo and Grandmaster Tony Diego. He also trained in Kali Ilustrisimo with one of his training partners and fellow Lameco Backyard member Guro Hans Tan, who was certified to teach Kali Ilustrsimo under Master Tony Diego.Additionally Guro Dino trained privately for several years in California and the Philippines with Professor Ireneo L. Olavides in Eskrima De Campo JDC-IO. Guro Dino also cites the importance of his training partners in Lameco SOG and Kapisanang Mandirigma in his growth. After the passing of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite, certain members of the Lameco Backyard group reformed also became know as Kapisanang Mandirigma. The group regularly continued  training, sparring, experimenting and seeking the deeper roots of their chosen arts. This group includes Guros Joel Adriatico, Hospecio “Bud” Balani Jr., Mar Elepaño, Choy Flores, Arnold Noche, Gary Quan, Hans Anton Tan and Pantaleon “Mang Leo” Revilles, Jr. (RIP). With frequent visits by Guro Lowell Pueblos, Guro Bong Hebia and honorary member Guro Ariel Flores Mosses.   … [Read more...]

Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room.

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Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room. http://youtu.be/11s-EeaYD6A Filipino Martial Arts with guest instructor Ariel Mosses at Green Valley Range in the Fight Room. This GVR Tacticals class is included in the Club Membership and open to the public. The S.A.F.E. Program (Survive an Attack by Fighting Effectively) is based on Filipino Martial Arts. Utilizing everyday objects like a pen, keys, a rolled up magazine, stick and a knife, Ariel Mosses instructs on basic self-defense techniques. These techniques can be utilized and adapted for different age groups and physical ability. Every month GV Range offers a Skill Building Class called "GVR Tacticals" with guest instructors who specialize in specific self - defense arts. Be sure to like and share our video and stop on by to get some Trigger Time on at Green Valley Range! Stay Safe! Guro Ariel F. Mosses is also an advisor for Mandirigma.org and a founding member of Kapisanang Mandirigma. More information on him at: http://combatfma.com, http://backyardeskrima.com/?cat=43 and http://backyardeskrima.com/?p=858         … [Read more...]

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS by Perry Gil S. Mallari FIGHT Times Editor

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS

Evidence of pre-colonial FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS May 25, 2014 12:30 am by Perry Gil S. Mallari FIGHT Times Editor While there is scant mention of the specific names of the martial arts that pre-colonial Filipinos practiced, I believe that various prototypes of Filipino martial arts (FMA) were already in existence long before the arrival of Spain. To me, three things serve as indicators of the existence of indigenous FMA: organized method of warfare, metallurgical technology and sophisticated blade culture. All three aforementioned were chronicled by the Spaniards when they arrived in the Philippines.    Organized method of warfareAsdang is the prehispanic Filipino term for hand-to-hand combat as mentioned by William Henry Scott in his excellent book Barangay: Sixteenth-Century Philippine Culture and Society (1994), “Asdang was hand-to-hand combat. Bulu was a duel. Hulaw was a man known to be on the lookout for an enemy,” he wrote. While it may be true that sheer number is the prime factor why the native army of Lapulapu defeated the forces of Magellan in Mactan, I am firm in my stand that the pre-colonial Filipinos were already schooled in their own methods of warfare. Scott in his book wrote that the Visayan general term for warfare was gubat. He distinguished combat engagements into two—gahat (by land) and mangayaw (by sea). Salakay is the word used for attacking.” On land attacks, he comments, “The preferred tactic on land was ambush—habon, saghid, hoom or pool—either by lying in wait or by such strategies as exposing a few agile warriors to enemy view to lure them into a trap. Sayang was to pass by hidden enemies unawares.”  Scott even referred to an individual tactic used while being pursued by the enemy as well as how the concept of death could affect a warrior’s psyche, “Pinaorihiyan was for a fleeing warrior to turn and spear his pursuer; naga kamatayan was to fight to the death; and mangin matay was a desperate man determined to die on the field of battle.” Terminologies pertaining to military affairs also abound as the following lines from Scott’s book indicate, “Special roles connected with the conduct of war included away, enemy; bantay, sentinel; bila, allies; kagon, mediator; and laway, spy.”   Continue reading article here: http://www.manilatimes.net/evidence-of-pre-colonial-filipino-martial-arts-2/99117/     … [Read more...]

The PBS Film: Crucible of Empire – The Spanish American War

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  The PBS Film: Crucible of Empire - The Spanish American War   One hundred years ago, United States celebrated victory in the Spanish-American War. Popular songs and headlines popularized Commodore Dewey's victories at sea and Theodore Roosevelt's ride up Kettle Hill. Although the Spanish-American War sparked unprecedented levels of patriotism and confidence, the defeat of the Spanish also raised new questions about the nation's role as a world power. CRUCIBLE OF EMPIRE: THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, narrated by award-winning actor Edward James Olmos, examines the colorful characters and historic events surrounding this 100-year-old war and its relevance to the twentieth century. When a declining Spain, beset by rebellion abroad, fell to American expansionism, the United States inherited her colonies and suddenly emerged as a world power. The experience and questions that the Spanish-American War raised about foreign intervention echo throughout the 20th century—as recent events in Kosovo show. Even in its own time, the war with Spain was understood as a turning point in American history. As the twentieth century ends, it is instructive to note the complexities and significance of this very brief war that began this century. In the words of noted historian Walter LaFeber, "The 1898 war literally as well as chronologically ushered in the United States as a major shaper, soon the major shaper, of twentieth-century world politics and commerce." In the process, it also unified a nation still embittered by Civil War divisions; debuted the media in its role as catalyst of U.S. intervention; built up the navy and inspired a re-evaluation of the army; and vastly broadened the powers of the president in wartime and foreign affairs. Clearly, the Spanish-American War was more than the war that ended the nineteenth century; it was also the war that launched the American century. Using original footage and period photographs, newspaper headlines, more than a dozen popular songs from the 1890s, and interviews with some of America's most prominent historians, CRUCIBLE OF EMPIRE tells how issues of race, economy, technology, yellow journalism, and public opinion propelled America into this war. Four 1990s Senators bring to life the 1899 Senate debate on imperialism: Patrick Leahy (VT), Frank Lautenberg (NJ), Paul Simon (IL), and Alan Simpson (WY). The film also features Larry Linville (Major Frank "Ferret Face" Burns of "M*A*S*H") as the voice of Rough Rider Theodore Roosevelt, Laurence Luckinbill as President William McKinley, and Lou Diamond Phillips as Philippine revolutionary Emilio Aguinaldo. Continue reading at: http://www.pbs.org/crucible/film.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g8NpQsmxj4 http://youtu.be/8g8NpQsmxj4 … [Read more...]